Dual sporting around the South West. What to pack?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Colorad0, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    I have a Husky 701 that I will be taking on the back of the motor home and touring around the SW. AZ, TX, NM, UT, NV, CA. I'm just looking to do day trips on the MC (mostly off-road), but I will be solo, and want to be prepared in case I have to spend a night out in the cold, or break down with the AZ sun beating down on me.

    I have an inreach and a wife at the other end (provided she has cell reception). She has a Jeep and knows how to drive it (has done Fins and Things in Moab).

    Obviously the weather can vary greatly depending on the time of year, so I want have everything I need to cover both hot and cold rides and swap out gear accordingly. I won't be riding if the overnight temp are much below freezing and I won't be riding if the daytime highs are much above 90.

    Lets break this down into five categories. Keep in mind I'm trying to keep my kit as small and light as reasonable. It has to pack down into a total of less than 60 liters. 30L on the bike and 30L on my back (excluding the rotopak full of water).

    (1) Tools
    (2) Navigation
    (3) Cold weather overnight survival
    (4) Hot weather/desert survival
    (5) First Aid

    I feel I have a pretty good idea on (2) as I've been riding solo (mostly enduro) in the rocky mountains for 8 years.

    For tools (on the bike) I'll be bringing.
    12v air compressor
    Tire plugs/repair kit (I run tubliss on the 701).
    Tow strap
    Lots of big zip ties
    Bailing wire
    Duct tape
    Flashlight
    Headlamp
    Maybe a small tool kit with some basic interchangeable sockets
    Fuel filter x 3
    Schrader valves and tool

    Navigation
    Garmin GPS with powered cradle
    Paper maps of the area along with a compass
    iphone with powered usb port
    Inreach

    Cold weather survival gear (one or two nights)
    Matches/lighter/fire steel/fire starters
    Silky 210mm folding saw
    Mora robust knife
    Super light weight/small down sleeping bag
    Sleeping pad
    Gore-tex bivy

    First Aid
    Blood clotting pack
    Bandages x4
    Gauze pad x4
    Aluminum splint x2
    Tourniquet
    Super glue
    Latex gloves
    Water purification tablets
    Electrolyte tablets
    Sunscreen
    Chap stick


    Hot weather
    Wide brimmed hat
    1 gallon Rotopax filled with ice & cold water
    3 liter camelbak
    Some sort of shade/shelter (not sure what)
    Clothes to change into if I break down (not sure what)


    I haven't covered food here, but obviously I will be bringing enough of that to last me a day or two. Same with riding gear. I will wear gear for the temps I will be riding in and bring a gore-tex jacket and gloves etc in case of rain.

    Aside, from the the tools and first aid, I'll be tailoring my pack to the conditions/climate. I'm not expecting to pack everything listed on every ride lol.

    I didn't mention fuel, but my 701 has an auxiliary tank (Rade Garage) for a total of 4.7 gallons.

    I appreciate any comments, suggestions, incite and personal experiences.
    #1
    Suncoaster likes this.
  2. radmann10

    radmann10 Derf Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,023
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Snake bite kit...just kidding. The Inreach is the best item on your list. Keep it on your body, not on the bike and enjoy AZ.

    The extra fuel will come in handy, I always like to go wandering off and often forget the time and distance, so extra fuel and water will really help. I'm not sure where you are going to be riding, but there are tons of great routes in AZ.
    #2
    Armyguy likes this.
  3. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,281
    Location:
    Corrales, New Mexico
    +1 on the InReach. Maybe get her on as well. Then she won't need cell coverage.

    I would add JB Quick Weld to your tool kit. Great for patching a crack in a case. The rest of your kit sounds like what I carry on every dirt ride. Like in Boy Scouts, Be Prepared!

    Also a cheap Cycle Gear cooling vest in a small dry bag with a quart of water added, can make a 100F afternoon feel nice an cool when moving.
    #3
    Colorad0 likes this.
  4. Bucho

    Bucho DAMNrider

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,954
    Location:
    Maryland
    QuickSteel is another one. I fixed a hole in the bottom of my crankcase over a decade ago. Still leak free!
    #4
  5. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    17,307
    Location:
    Delaware Ohio
    tooth brush... you can brush your teeth or clean parts... :lol3 Sorry, just my first thoughts.
    #5
    Colorad0 likes this.
  6. tominboise

    tominboise Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,746
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    I would add one of the small water filters - the kind used by backpackers to purify water from streams, etc. Or purification tablets. Also, at least two different ways to start a fire.

    Edit: now I see purification tabs on your first aid list.
    #6
  7. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @motopossum

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Oddometer:
    12,667
    Location:
    FLAT Lander
    #7
  8. ShaftEd

    ShaftEd Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2001
    Oddometer:
    3,858
    Location:
    San Diego, CA USA
    MicroStart - Mini lithium battery jumper
    #8
    Colorad0 likes this.
  9. jay547

    jay547 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,077
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    A whistle and signal mirror for when you fall on your Inreach and break it. :D
    #9
  10. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    Thanks for the suggestions guys!

    I will add the jump starter battery and quick weld to the list. As noted I have a few ways to start a fire and some water tablets.

    That cooling vest looks interesting. I always wear a Leatt Pressure Suit and soak it in water when riding warmer weather down in the CO desert. But I probably should re-think my body armor, because my outfit it geared towards colder temps. Even in the summer I'm riding in 50-75 deg temp up here in the mountains.

    I got caught out on a dual sport ride a few weeks back (lower elevation) where the temps got into the mid 90's and I think I got a touch of heat stroke.

    Anyone have a suggestion for clothing if I get stranded in the heat of the day? Do light weight synthetic materials work best? Wool maybe? Long sleeve shirt and pants? I have a tarp I could bring along for some shade.
    #10
  11. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    I was hoping that InReach would offer a family plan, but no dice. They want $25 per month per device. We a have an ACR ResQlink PLB as well that the wife keep in the jeep in case she gets into trouble.
    #11
  12. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    Ha! I've been carrying my InReach for 5 years in my backpack and I've crashed a bunch at 20+ mph, even rolled onto my back once right after tearing my MCL (grade III tear). Not a problem, but backpack carry is a compromise.

    However, I got all geared up the other day and went to turn on my InReach and the freaking thing would not turn on. Garmin ended up exchanging it for a refurbished one for $130. Not bad, but I'm just happy it failed when I was getting ready for a ride, not lying in a ditch somewhere with major injuries.
    #12
  13. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,281
    Location:
    Corrales, New Mexico
    Another thing to think about is rescue insurance. We had an out of state rider break a tib/fib, compound fracture on a simple tip over! He got an ambulance ride of about 70 miles then a med jet ride back to his home state/town. It would have been around $100K without the insurance. I believe his insurance took care of all of it.
    #13
  14. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    405
    Location:
    Lafayette, LA
    Do you have links/info on where to get rescue insurance, coverage, costs? I can Google it, but thought you might have a first hand recommendation. Tks.
    #14
  15. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,281
    Location:
    Corrales, New Mexico
    Sorry, no I don't have any information. I think it was available through a link of the DeLorme site before Garmin bought them.
    #15
  16. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    Thanks, that's a good point. While I haven't researched S&R insurance, I have read a some anecdotal posts about it. Coverage seems to be pretty hit and miss, depending upon which hospitals calls in the chopper etc.
    #16
  17. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    #17
  18. millican

    millican Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    Oddometer:
    463
    Location:
    Ocean Springs, MS
    CB or similar (some walkie talkies overlap). Lots of places there don't have cell reception, but plenty of people have CBs. I still have mine from when I lived there.
    #18
    Colorad0 likes this.
  19. Traxx

    Traxx Long timer

    Joined:
    May 14, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,101
    Location:
    Ft Worth Texas
    Light weight long sleeve for cooling and preventing sunburn, mil surplus poncho for rain, shelter, water collection, add a woooobie for warmth. More gauze and a ace elastic type bandage. If you have access to a vacuum sealer you can use that to compress your soft stuff and water seal things that really need to stay dry. It is usually a heavier duty plastic than zip lock bags.
    More water and refill every chance you get.
    #19
    molochnik and Colorad0 like this.
  20. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    781
    We have a couple of Baofeng radios that we set up on a walkie talkie channel. They mostly get used when backing up the motorhome or when the wife uses our jeep as a pilot car in tight areas.

    But yeah, I should add that to the list of things to pack on my ride when going into more remote places. With the 12 or 15 inch antenna they can cover a lot of distance.
    #20