Ducati 950 and MotoGuzzi v85tt manufacturer support

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by No-Fret, Aug 7, 2019.

  1. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Hello,

    I am looking at going to a different bike next year. I've seen great reviews of the Ducati 950 and MotoGuzzi v85tt but curious about reliability and manufacturer support from these companies.

    There is a Ducati dealership 20 minutes from my house so that is a plus. The nearest Guzzi shop is 2 hours away.

    Also not sure about annual costs on mandatory factory maintenance etc.

    Thanks for any insight you can provide.
    #1
  2. StormShearon

    StormShearon Been here awhile

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    I have owned two Moto Guzzis - a 2007 Norge and a 2015 Stelvio - I traded the Stelvio in on a 2017 Multistrada 950. On the Moto Guzzi, if you are reasonably handy around the garage, you should be able to take care of all normal maintenance yourself. The valve jobs are easy peasy and so are oil changes - both engine and transmission\rear end. The big issue with Moto Guzzi is the small number of dealers and Guzzi's very lackluster support. On the Norge, there were issues with the fairing plastics, which were never addressed by the factory (some bad design decisions on a number of the mounting tabs - plastic way too thin and easily broken by the bikes side to side vibration). They are good bikes, but you do need to be able to handle repairs on your own - fortunatley there is a lot of online assistance as the Moto Guzzi community is pretty helpful. They are generally reliable.

    For the Multi, I have not had any issues other than one recall for a coolant hose that was not designed well - it was not reinforced correctly at the 'Y' in the hose. Promptly taken care of by my dealer. On the Ducati, you can do your own maintenance if you are handy - though there is more to it than with the Guzzi. Also, you have to go to the dealer with the 950 to reset the service warning and check for any issues\software updates as you cannot do those yourself. Bike has been very reliable and I have no intention of trading it in.

    I think both are good bikes.
    #2
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  3. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Thanks, that answers a whole lot of questions for me. I do all the basic maintence on my current bikes.

    I need to test ride both bikes but I have sat on both and find them to be very comfortable. I'm leaning toward the MG for the easy access to the valves and shaft drive but love the better suspension and sportiness of the Ducati.

    Can I ask how much the Ducati reset and services run?
    #3
  4. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer

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    I used to do everything on my 1200 MTS except the valve check, belt and spark plug replacement at the 18,000 mile intervals. The dealer would charge me about $1000 for that, parts included. I was doing the oil and filter at 6,000 miles instead of the manual stated interval of 9,000 miles, so when the wrench would pop up, my dealer would clear it for free.
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  5. s-flow

    s-flow Adventurer

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    I have good experience with Piaggio the few time I had problems with my V9 Bobber, it’s probably a huge difference on the dealers though, a relative small brand with few dealers (Guzzi that is).
    I test rode the Ducati 950 before I decided to go MG V85. A thing with the Duc was it has some really strong vibrations in the seat at highway speeds (a rpm band that sat very bad in speeds, recall about 115-125 KM/H or something), else that Ducati was very nice and smooth.. so It was the vibes that killed the deal for me there, just to test out before buying.

    The Guzzi vibes too, but nicely everywhere :). ( when properly broken in )

    Greetings, Daniel
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  6. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Thanks for the info that helps.
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  7. StormShearon

    StormShearon Been here awhile

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    I think I paid less than $50.00 US when I took it in last year to get the service icon reset and to check if there were any software updates. I had done the 12 month service (bascially an oil change) myself.
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  8. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Thank you all for the information. I will be looking at some test rides soon.
    #8
  9. StormShearon

    StormShearon Been here awhile

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    Good luck!
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  10. danketchpel

    danketchpel Long timer

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    I have 2 Ducatis (Sport Classic & Desert Sled) and a Guzzi Stelvio. Dealer support for both of them was good a few years ago, now both dealers close to me are gone and options for both are about 1 hr away in different directions.

    I do my own service work and for the basics like oil changes they are the same, actually the Ducs are easier as only 1 oil needs changing, the Guzzi has 3 (engine, trans, rear drive). Plugs are easy on both. After that the Guzzi gets much easier. I hate adjusting Desmo valves and removing all the stuff to get to them on the Sled. Ducs need the cam belts replaced every 15k miles or 5 yrs and the belts aren't cheap. They aren't too hard to change.

    Ducati discourages people from doing their own service work. It's very hard to get a service manual, Ducati won't sell you one. And dealers charge stupid hourly rates. Indy Ducati service shops are a better bet.

    Most of the service work on Guzzis is pretty easy and software/manuals are easier to come by.

    Both have been pretty reliable.

    I think the most important is how you like riding each particular bike, then weigh the other factors.

    I will admit it took me a year to decide to buy the Desert Sled as I was hoping Triumph was going to come out with a better Scrambler. I really wanted a high performance 900 based 6 spd, didn't happen. Part of the wait was me deciding if I wanted to deal with Desmo valves again. Triumph's valve adjust is much easier.
    #10
  11. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Thanks for the great info. I would not be doing belts on my own so that's a bummer on the Ducs. On the Guz I can see myself changing all the oils and doing the valves as they are easy to get to and if I have the documentation.

    How much was the belt change on the Duc? I am not impressed by the local Duc dealer unfortunately.

    Thank you
    #11
  12. Gmc28

    Gmc28 Gmower

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    Belt changes on ducs are not difficult, though the first time you’d want to do some reading and get familiar first.
    Belts from california cycle works (I think that’s their name) I seem to recall will cost u about $70 each, though someone will chime in with better/fresher data on that. I’ve done all my own belts for years on ducs, but the one time I had my dealer do it I was surprised that it wasn’t that costly for the labor. But they’ll charge the price for the oem belts, which are more expensive.
    Love my goose, but also love my multi.... no way I’m giving up either, so don’t know which way I’d lean in your shoes. Whichever is more fun to ride. We always make these decisions so practical, which is smart to some extent, but fact is we usually don’t NEED these bikes, we WANT them, so pick the one that gives the biggest smile, and know that either way you’ll leave something on the table u wish u had.
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  13. danketchpel

    danketchpel Long timer

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    Ya, the CA Cycleworks belts are roughly 1/2 the price of the OEM Gates belts. I tried them in my Sport Classic but eventually went back to the Gates belts. The Cycleworks belts work OK but are a little noisier as they have a different harmonic quality. The Gates belts run quieter which is the primary reason I went back to them.

    They aren't that hard to change, though some people will go on endlessly about the tensioning of them. I haven't done belts on a 4V Duc motor, only the air cooled 2V.

    There are some videos on Youtube about changing and adjusting the belts.
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  14. huub

    huub Been here awhile

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    the choice also depends also on the amount of riding you expect to do,
    doing lots of miles on a ducati is going to be expensive, you have chains , sprockets and desmo setups to consider.
    parts prices are different too on both manufacturers.

    i own both guzzi's and ducati's, the guzzi's get all the year round riding, the ducati's are for nice weather posing.
    Working on the desmo heads is not particularly hard , but a absolute pain in the ....
    so budget in the dealer fee to have them done.

    this is obviously not a issue if you do 5000 miles/year. but something you might consider.
    #14