1. ADVRIDER Print Magazine!
    We're doing two more print magazines year. July & November. 144 pages of high quality adventure riding stories, photography and interviews!

    Click here to purchase both for $35.
    Dismiss Notice

Ducati Multistrada V4

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Yossarian™, Feb 9, 2021.

  1. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,242
    Location:
    the 'Ha
    (there's been a V4 on the horizon thread going, but that was to talk about what the bike may or may not be. now that it's here, this is a thread to discuss ownership and what the bike is)

    Hoping to see some V4 / V4S owners posting up with feedback from their bike and what their experience thus far has been.
    #1
  2. wpbarlow

    wpbarlow Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2003
    Oddometer:
    18,752
    Location:
    Central NJ
    #2
    Blakduk and thirsty 1 like this.
  3. RV8Pilot

    RV8Pilot Blue,Green,Blue,Gree.....

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    249
    Got mine last week Walter and it's everything that I''ve read. Fantastic machine and I can't wait for the break-in period to be over. I just wish there were a few of NW NJ's curvy roads around down here!
    #3
  4. danketchpel

    danketchpel Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,350
    Location:
    Camarillo, CA
    I did a short test ride on the V4S last weekend, wish it had been a bit longer of course and the bike was still on break-mapping.

    For me being a Ducati owner and having ridden several earlier Multis it was a strange experience primarily because the engine doesn't feel anything like previous Ducati twins as you might expect. I can't say it's bad or great, and I didn't have enough chance to really explore the full range of the engine. I also didn't have much time to explore different ride modes so I was in Touring the whole time for what that's worth. I think before I spent that much money I'd really want a much more substantial test ride to see how I really felt about that engine. These days it's a bit hard to separate throttle response mapping vs actual engine response. It was rather soft early in the throttle turn, more so than I'm used to, but reacted faster with larger input so I suspect it's a very responsive engine and the mapping is key to getting what you'd like, again more time needed to really know, maybe another mode would be "just right".

    It definitely has plenty of power as you'd expect, but I didn't get to explore the full depth for sure and you really can't until the initial service as been done and the ECU set for full operation range. It was hard to hear the sound as the stock pipe is Honda quiet, very hard to hear the exhaust note while riding which was a bummer as I really wanted to know now it might sound a bit uncorked. It is different than say a Honda VFR800 V4 or an Aprilia V4, closer to the Aprilia than the Honda I'd say.

    It was generally fairly smooth but not as smooth as I'd hoped for on the freeway and it felt a bit short geared turning around 5,500 rpm at an indicated 70 mph. It didn't feel "busy", but I was just kinda surprised I hit 6th as soon as I did. I really would have liked to see how the engine felt over a wider freeway speed range, it was pretty brief.

    The clutch was nice, that is not always the case with Ducatis and was appreciated. The shifting feel at the lever was a bit odd, sorta springy/spongy feeling especially on down travel, up travel seemed shorter/quicker feeling. I didn't miss any shifts but it wasn't the most positive / reassuring feel. The brakes feel like state of the art Brembos, about what you'd expect.

    The suspension felt amazing, plush and controlled at the same time. I thought the ergos were good for me (5'9" 30" inseam) with a nice reach to the bars, not too long. It had the standard seat in the standard position and seat to pegs distance was good and about average for an ADV bike height as far as reach to the ground, maybe "just barely" balls of my feet but no more both sides.

    I didn't notice any funky wind buffeting but it was a short ride and no head winds. The forward view is kinda "large" looking with a wide tank near the top, but fairly narrow feeling around the front of the seat / knee area. The engine cases don't stick out much which is nice. The flat screen dash is nice, fairly simple layout and easy to read. I didn't get a chance to work with the menu system much, but it appears to be easier to navigate than in the past.

    I do very much like the extended valve service intervals, it's about time Ducati took note of the cost of ownership of their bikes. That is probably one of my primary attractions to the bike.

    Would I buy this bike over others, particularly the BMW GS? Not sure, I like shaft drive a lot along with the feels of twins. I'd have to try to ride both back to back, maybe more than once. I've owned BMW in the past (28 yrs) and currently have 2 Ducatis. My current big ADV bike is a Moto Guzzi Stelvio and my other bikes are in my sig for reference. I've also ridden the KTM 1190 in both Std and R models.
    #4
    Jmjenia, dsrydr, rick danger and 2 others like this.
  5. CB350ER

    CB350ER Pavement Pounder

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    22
    I have a '18 Ducati 1260S and test rode the V4S last week. It was a brief test however I immediately knew during this test that I preferred my 1260S and won't be upgrading. Styling wise, I found the V4S not as attractive. While riding, I preferred the engine vibrations of the 1260S over a V4 which is surprising since I love 4 cylinder bikes. For some reason, I was expecting the V4 engine to be smoother than it is. I also preferred the single rear swingarm from an aesthetic standpoint. Power-wise, I did not notice any difference however I didn't push it to the limits.

    I found the controls having more steps on the V4S. For example, turning on heat grips... old bike, all I do is press heat button and I'm set. With the V4S, I need to press heat button to turn it on, then use the left joystick to toggle between the heat options. The extra steps for that is unnecessary. It's like you're using the joystick more often to access everything compared to the 1260S where it's only up/down/enter to go through the menu.

    I do love the radar cruise control. That was a big plus to me. That's the one thing I would absolutely love on my 1260S. Also mentioned above, I really like the service intervals.
    #5
    rick danger likes this.
  6. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,242
    Location:
    the 'Ha
    Today was the day. Panniers still to arrive. 0304211616_HDR.jpg
    #6
  7. parkcrf

    parkcrf Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    117
    Congrats! I've always liked the matte grey, my last 2 multis were mate grey.
    #7
    Yossarian™ likes this.
  8. dsrydr

    dsrydr Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    297
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    Very nice!!
    #8
    Yossarian™ likes this.
  9. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,943
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Looks great in that colour! I look forward to you telling us all about it. :D
    #9
  10. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    35,924
    Location:
    Land of Endless Summer.
    NOICE

    I get to Demo one of these bad-boys at the Japanese launch next weekend....that DOC membership is finally paying off.
    #10
    rick danger likes this.
  11. rick danger

    rick danger The further adventures of

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2005
    Oddometer:
    12,269
    Location:
    Oneonta, NY
    Will be good to hear your 1260 comparo.
    #11
  12. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    35,924
    Location:
    Land of Endless Summer.
    I don't have a 1260, I have a 1200 single spark, circa 2012 vintage.
    #12
    rick danger likes this.
  13. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,242
    Location:
    the 'Ha
    My personal notes on the V4S, coming from a 1200 Enduro (same wheel combo).

    The fit of the V4S is better for me; with seat in lower position I can flat-foot the bike, while on the Enduro the most I ever got down was the balls of the feet. Weight distribution on the V4S feels lower also, and more manageable. I have the spoked wheel version, intended to perform duties similar to what my Enduro provided, which is 90/10 riding. Making the seat height changes to both seats is a cinch.

    So far, I have kept the bars in the Road position, and so standing operation is a bit of a stretch, but I don't have to bend over at the waist to reach the grips. If I end up rotating the bars to Off Road position, I think standing will be easier. For reference, I am 6'0", with a 32" inseam and 34" sleeve length. Reach to the bars in Road position is natural and I don't have to lean forward at all; in fact, I have a bit of bend in my elbows. That's with me scooched back on the rider seat so that my derriere is touching the passenger seat. There's a bit of room to come forward on the seat as it is pretty flat and doesn't lock you into one position.

    The engine is fantastic; it never feels like it's making a fuss, and hitting 6K revs during break-in is all too easy. It'll be nice once I've got that behind me and can open it up. It feels faster than my 1200 Enduro, but it's hard to tell if that's because I have to shift early during the run-in period. The quickshifter is also fantastic; it's like butter and goes through the gears without any fuss or fanfare. The only small lurch is when on throttle and making the 1-2 shift as it's a big ratio change. I'll add that the gearbox is very smooth and easy to find each gear and neutral; also the false neutral between 5 and 6 isn't there as it was on all my other Ducatis.

    Grip and seat heat are both very good; in Low power mode both get plenty warm on a 50 degree day, so I'd say that very cold or wet riding is possible with the max output.

    Wind protection is far and away better than my Enduro. Visor-up operation at highway speed is possible as there's no buffeting. I have the standard screen -- the 6-position one-hand mechanism is a wonder -- and may consider a touring (taller) screen but am going to give it some time before I decide on that.

    The mirrors are steady, stable, and provide clear-as-can-be views, something that seems small but makes a big difference to me.

    The joystick control was a bit of a pain at first, but quickly I got into the rhythm of using it and now it's no issue at all. I still find myself trying to use it for turn signalling, but that's fading also. Give me a week's ownership and I think that the controls will feel pretty natural, just like every other bike I've owned or ridden a long distance.

    Popping the V4S onto the center stand is far easier than the Enduro was, and I used the CS on the Enduro quite a bit. Just a lighter bike and lighter rear end in particular, make the difference here.

    I'm not excited about the fuel consumption, but knew that it was non-optimal before buying. I stop for bladder relief often enough that adding fuel won't be an imposition. I guess the 350-mile range of the Enduro kind of spoiled me in that regard. I think that 38-40 MPG on the freeway is quite attainable.

    The Ducati Connect app needs work. I fought with it for a while, but my Android Auto and Tasker routines kept interfering. I'm not ditching everything I've already customized for my other vehicles just to make the Ducati happy, so I've set up an older phone to use for Ducati Connect with all of the other stuff disabled, so that will (going forward) allow me to use the Sygic navigation without anything trying to clobber or override it in the background. Of course, that phone will be in airplane mode with maps downloaded, so phone/entertainment use via bike controls is ruled out. I don't really mind that at all, as I link my main phone to a Sena 50S and use it for phone/entertainment and it works well. In my opinion, though, the bike/phone integration thing has a long way to go. As a bonus, the older phone is smaller and fits in the tank pocket easily.

    I will have the standard side panniers (on their way) for now, plus look to SW-Motech to develop an ALU-Rack for this bike so that I can use, when necessary, all of the top boxes and rack extenders that I already own. I'm having a hard time thinking about what other accessories to add as the bike comes with just about everything you would want.

    Overall, I'm pleased with the bike. I see that Ducati may have a 17" front and SSSA on a version for 2022, and that'll probably make a lot of people happy.
    #13
    jimmex, Requiem84, dsrydr and 3 others like this.
  14. bjweber

    bjweber n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1
    I picked up a 2021 V4S in red two weeks ago and I have about 1100 miles on it now. I have previously owned a 2011 MTS, a 2013 MTS, and a 2018 MTS that I traded in on the V4S.

    There are things I see as improvements:
    • The riding position, for me, is more comfortable on the V4S than on my past Multistrada's. You sit more in the bike than on top of it. However for some people that may not be what they are looking for.
    • Wind protection is better on the V4S, for me, than it is on the 1260S. I am 6 foot 2 inches tall with a 32 inch inseam. I get a lot less buffeting and wind noise on the V4S with the stock screen at the top height than I did in my past Multi's. I am going to try a 3rd party windscreen when the aftermarket starts releasing them.
    • The new dash is for the most part easy to read and looks great. Being able to easily adjust the tilt of the dash is nice. However Ducati Connect has quite a few issues that need sorting.
    • The mirrors on the V4S are more stable than on any of my past Multi's. They have more adjustability too. It will be nice when the blind spot monitoring is active as I think that will be a nice safety feature.
    • The new panniers are a big improvement over the 1260 panniers. With the 1260 panniers I always felt like part of the plastic connector was going to break when I was taking the panniers on/off the bike and you had to fiddle with them to get them on correctly.With the V4S you just flip up the little red levers and the panniers easily slide onto the bike. When off the bike the V4S panniers can be stood up, while the 1260 panniers always fell over.
    • On my 1260S I put a throttle spacer in because the throttle felt like it had a lot of slop, even thought it has ride by wire throttle. So far, after ~1100 miles, I do not feel I need a throttle spacer in the V4S.
    • The “hill hold” works great. From what I recall on the MTS 1260 it only had the “hill assist” and after ten seconds it stopped holding, on the MTS V4S it keeps the hold for a long time. I believe until you release the clutch or apply throttle.
    • On my past three Multistrada's I always had issues with my left foot hitting the center stand while riding, so I would cut it down. That is not an issue for me on the V4S and I do not feel I need to make any adjustments to the center stand.
    • The venting of heat away from the rider does seem to work. We had a day here where it got up into the low 70’s. On my 1260 and 1200 at that temp I would feel a bit of heat coming off the bike at speed. With the MTS I did not feel nearly as warm. It will be interesting to see how well this works during the 90F+ days we get here in the summer.
    • I find the stock saddle to be comfortable and I had no issues sitting on it for a couple of 300 mile days. Unless I start having comfort issues on 400+ mile days, I do not intend to replace the stock saddle.
    • I did not expect the heated seat to make that much of a difference to me, but it is nice to have on days when I leave home in the morning and it is in the high 30's or low 40's. The seat does take a few minutes to warm up though.
    • It is very easy to adjust the seat height between the two different positions. You just move it between the two different slots on the base of the tank. On the MTS 1260 you had to screw on the adapters which took a bit of time.
    • The brakes are very good and seem to be an improvement over the MTS 1260. They feel like they have more stopping power and the rear does work well for me.
    • The quick shifter is improved over the MTS 1260S. Shifts and engagement are much smoother, especially down shifts.

    There are a few things I am on the fence about or have issues with:
    • Vibration of the foot pegs has been an issue for me. I am not yet sure if this is me being overly sensitive to the vibration of the V4S or if there is an issue with my bike. I have been riding a string of Multistrada's for the past decade with the V-twin, so it is possible I am just not used to the vibration of a V4. From 4,000-6,000 RPM's, which is freeway range for me, the pegs vibrate at a high rate and after about 20 minutes of riding it is enough to put my feet to sleep. I am wearing Daytona Roadstar GTX boots, so it is not like I am wearing flip flops. I have also never had my feet fall asleep due to vibrations of a bike before and I have had quite a few bikes over the years. I am working to sort this out with Ducati NA Customer Support and they have me testing a demo MTS V4S today, while they do a through check of my bike, to determine is the issue is me or my bike.
    • Ducati Connect is a bit slow to get going and has crashed on me a few times. It takes a good 2-3 minutes to get Ducati Connect up and running before you leave on a ride. When you are in Ducati Connect you cannot adjust things like the heated seat, heated grips, suspension, etc. and must exit out of Ducati Connect. This is not a huge deal but it does mean a lot more button presses to do basic things. Once connected to Ducati Connect I have found that I cannot start music playlists from within Ducati Connect and must start them with the default media player on the dash or only one song out of the playlist will play and this will stop. On long day rides I like to have a bit of music going and had I not found the work around it would have been a bummer to have to hit the control stick after every song. According to Ducati Customer Support this issue will be sorted in an update to Ducati Connect that is releasing this month. I also had Ducati Connect get to the point where it would not work at all and the only way to sort out the issue was to remove and reinstall the app.
    • You are stuck with Sygic Navigation if you want to have navigation displayed on the dash. While this looks cool in the marketing material and Youtube videos for the bike, I have found Sygic to have a lot of issues. In my area, Northern California, Sygic tells you to "Keep Left" at every freeway exit as opposed to just telling you when you are a few miles away from your intended exit. It is very annoying to have it constantly saying "Keep Left" as you near every freeway exit. Sygic is also bad at selecting the fastest route available. It always selects a route that takes longer than what either Google Maps or Apple Maps recommends. Ducati Connect is based off of Bosch My Spin and Bosch My Spin supports Apple Maps, so hopefully Ducati will wise up and allow Apple Maps to work within Ducati Connect. In the interim I am probably going to mount my phone to the handle bars and use Google Maps for navigation.
    • Fuel economy is not great. On the freeway I am getting 30-34 MPG. Of course freeway speeds here in California tend to be in the 75-80+ MPH range. On a recent ride towards Lake Tahoe on Highway 50, where speeds are lower (55-65 MPH), I was able to average 39 MPG over a 109 mile trip. I have yet to get 200 miles out of a tank and am seeing more like 150-180. I am going to try for a 200 mile ride on one tank today and see if I can make it that far if I stay below 75 MPH.

    B2150B8B-3497-4B15-ACA3-B119816DCF82.JPG

    Attached Files:

    #14
    jimmex, GeoAggie, staudio and 8 others like this.
  15. goodhorsey

    goodhorsey Naai jou ma Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,181
    Location:
    Brooklyn!
    thanks for this. I'm going to keep my eye out for people mentioning the vibration issue - I haven't noticed that before in reviews.
    #15
  16. FFC

    FFC Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    London
    #16
  17. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,822
    Location:
    CA
    Came in here to ask about this. Saw this - https://www.asphaltandrubber.com/recall/ducati-multistrada-v4-engine-replacement-recall/

    "For the North American market, this means that 60 models (44 in the USA, 13 in Mexico, and 3 in Canada) will be affected by this recall, and will see their engine’s completely replaced by Ducati North America" - that's not bad at all. Have any owners on here been contacted about this yet?

    "For their trouble, affected North American owners will be compensated by Ducati in three ways: they will get 1) two years of free official annual maintenance, 2) a free radar software upgrade ($850 + labor), and 3) a $1,500 voucher good for Ducati apparel or accessories." Plus a new engine - nice customer service!
    #17
    Tenerrod likes this.
  18. atwoodtja

    atwoodtja Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2004
    Oddometer:
    833
    Location:
    New England, US
    FWIW, this is a better outcome than Ducati and the lawyer-scum gave us when the Multistrada gas tanks were failing. At least this time around you get an actual fix rather than something that is just going to fail again with no further recourse allowed.
    #18
  19. DucSyd

    DucSyd Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2016
    Oddometer:
    99
    Location:
    Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Hi Guys, just clicked over 1000ks today, so ready for the first service.
    I am coming from a Ducati 1200 Enduro. I used that mainly for off road long rides all through the country regions of eastern Australia. I brought a KTM 790 to do more off road focused rides and wanted the Multi V4 as a long haul road tourer, that can do unsealed country roads also. I also have a Panigale V4 (amongst other Ducati twins), so I am a real Ducati tragic.
    I jumped on buying the Multi V4 as soon as it was announced as I love the V4 in my panigale, what a great engine. I wanted that in a tourer.
    So my first 1000ks on the Multi V4 has been everything I was hoping it would be.
    Coming from the Multi Enduro it is obviously smaller. And me being only 168cm (5’6”) it is great I can put both feet down on the low seat setting. It feels lighter too and better on the road. The fairing is far better and all the wings and vents work perfectly. But it’s the engine that is the star. As I hoped it would be. I felt with the 1200 multi enduro that the engine really didn’t belong in the bike as it was still basically a superbike engine neutered by electronics to make it all work. The Granturisomo V4 has been designed as a stand alone engine for this type of bike. It so different to the desmocedici stradale engine in my Panigale it hard to even compare.
    The Multi V4 has a much lower rev range, is very tourquey at the low and mid range, beautifully smooth and yet powerful. It’s perfect. I am sure Ducati will use this in many new models yet to come. It is the first Ducati I have owned where the gearing feels low. But I guess that is because it is all designed to be ridden at normal legal speeds and doesn’t need to cheat it’s way through noise and emissions tests. It takes a bit of getting used to and after 1000ks I feel I am now understanding it all much better.
    I have the radar fitted and it is a revelation, sure to become standard on bikes from here on. I have cars with adaptive cruise control, lane assist, etc so to have it on a bike is great for the long freeway sections. The rear radar with warnings in the mirrors are great, I want all the aids I can have when droning down a freeway with idiot car drivers.
    On freeway sections it’s so smooth, comfortable and effortless it is a step change up.
    I brought mine with the travel pack, which has the heated grips, seat and panniers, and all are a step ahead of the Multi enduro. I also got the cast wheels as I don’t need spokes I have those on my KTM, I want this to be more road focused.
    I read all sorts of complaints about the electronics but I don’t have any such complaints. I did lock myself in the garage with the bike hooked up to a battery charger while I just went through all the options, and modified all the modes to my my preference and to get to understand how the toggle works. It didn’t take long. It really is very impressive and with all the maps, engine options and electronic suspension settings and the electronic suspension you can have multiple bikes at the flick of a button. It has its own mode button, so no need to go through a menu. I change modes frequently depending what riding mood I am in or what roads I am about to ride. No point getting a bike with all this if you don’t learn it, set your own preferences and then use it.
    As for Ducati connect, no issues from me, seems to work perfect. I have a Sena headset which is paired so I can listen to music, radio or use the phone simply. Just if your stopping for a short time, just turn the engine off not the whole bike (there is a seperate button) so it all stays connected. If on a long stop and you turn the whole bike off it needs to reconnect. Just means you have to accept it on your phone. Just do it while your putting your gear on, so it doesn’t take any more time.
    Having the phone pocket with the charger on the tank is brilliant, I really like all this.
    The satellite navigation with Sygic seems great for what I do, and it’s cool having the dash turn into a map. I can’t fault any of it. I do have this on my car, so maybe I’m used to it.
    I don’t mean to sound like a one eyed fan, but this is exactly what I hoped Ducati would build and they did, so I am happy.
    Cheers all. 6567B1FC-DBE6-4E34-983F-9178A06FB9C5.jpeg
    #19
    Blakduk, jimmex, rick danger and 2 others like this.
  20. goodhorsey

    goodhorsey Naai jou ma Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,181
    Location:
    Brooklyn!
    how often do you ride the bicycle? do you like it as much as a bicycle as you like the v4 duc?
    #20