Ducati Multistrada V4

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Yossarian™, Feb 9, 2021.

  1. Jetpilot5

    Jetpilot5 Been here awhile

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    It'll be interesting to hear your thoughts after the test rides. Assuming you really like Yamaha's triple, I have a guess at which engine you'll like better. I had essentially that same engine in my Niken. Of course, there's more to it than just the engine.
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  2. coloktmGS

    coloktmGS Been here awhile

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    For those who say the v4 motor is “boring” the s1000 motor is worse.
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  3. KeithU

    KeithU Been here awhile

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    Exactly. I expect I'll enjoy both engines, and they should both offer excellent suspension. I'll be paying close attention to wind management, vibration, and overall comfort. Based on what I've read so far it sounds like I'll favor the Ducati, but who knows.

    In any case it'll be a few months. We just bought a hot tub so I need to replenish my motorcycle down payment funds. I expect this will be a winter purchase.
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  4. Ocotillo Boy

    Ocotillo Boy Been here awhile Supporter

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    You won’t. I demo’d one. Nice but very cramped. Cool for daily rides but if you plan on going anywhere the V4 is superior....IMHO
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  5. KeithU

    KeithU Been here awhile

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    Maybe, I really need to ride them myself. I've heard people call the FJ-09 cramped yet I find it quite comfortable for LD riding (and I'm 6'3"). My ideas about comfort seem to be my own.
  6. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    I was not expecting to like the new V4S as much as I did, but I'm finding that it's enough Multistrada for me when I need Multistrada, and it bridged the gap on comfort / touring ergos that the GS seems to do well so IMHO they made the perfect Multistrada all-rounder GS competitor with this new bike.
    The S1000XR IMHO (I rode one in 2016) was very nice and aside from the I4 characteristics, rode a lot like the 2014 Multi I owned back then - fast, fun, sport-touring, but I was wishing for a bit more in the comfort dept (like I was with my 2014). I used to love railing on my 2014, that bike was fast as f*ck - the S1000XR was as well.
    I think the new one will be also, but it seems like it made incremental improvements on that 2016 bike, nothing major?


    Flash forward to last weekend, I was out playing on my V4S and was passed by 2 folks on sportbikes going quite well, on a series of roads i knew decently enough. I wicked it up in sport mode and while I wasn't able to 100% keep up, I didn't really get left behind (they were always in sight for the next corner). I wasn't really trying to race, just wanted to keep up and really wring my V4S out as I just got it back from 1st service 2 weeks ago.
    The front 19" wheel doesn't give up anything to the 17" and the motor and skyhook was flat out f*cking amazing. I would like better tires to up my confidence in cornering feel, and maybe still get more seat time to get used to the bike, but the V4S is fucking fast enough and fucking responsive enough for my riding, even considering my previous 2014 PP and how I used to rail it.
    I'll be curious about the new Multi 17" model with SSSA but if it's any more hardcore than that, I'll stick with my V4S. The new S1000XR seems like it's a good update to a bike that plays in that realm of where the 2014-2015 Multis did, so if the new bike is "too soft" for folks, the new S1000XR may be worth a look.
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  7. Steve_A

    Steve_A n00b

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    I got the full Sport with the Akrapovic. I found out through this link that there are two different systems and the one Ducati puts on is not what you really want--just a show piece.
    Fortunately for me, I don't like loud bikes--that just attracts unwanted attention. When I go fast, I prefer to be "under the radar". Still, the sound with the factory Akrapovic is not as loud as the valvetrain, which is disappointing.
  8. Steve_A

    Steve_A n00b

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    The first 2000 miles, i thought the seat was in the lower position. One thousand of that was an Adventure ride with buddies and got about 100 miles off-road. The bike was way too tall and top heavy and was zero fun in the slow, technical stuff (boulders and mud holes), particularly with nothing more than the crash bars for protection. Later I found the seat was not in lower position (it was difficult to put it into lower). Combine that with the ability to lower the suspension per this thread and it changes the bike's characteristics significantly.

    I ride a Husky 501 with Rekluse clutch as my normal dirt bike and found that the V4s in first gear at idle goes way too fast for technical terrain--particularly when conditioned to riding with an unstallable Rekluse. My overall impression of the gearing of the V4S is 1st is too tall and 6th is too short. It would have been better for Ducatic to take a page out of the WR450's trans ratios...
  9. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    I would not have thought to compare a V4S to a WR450 for off-road riding. :jack
  10. Steve_A

    Steve_A n00b

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    Sorry, was not comparing the two. The YZ (track bike) has very closely and evenly spaced gearing, whereas the WR (desert bike) has a low first gear and a much higher top gear. That allows plonking through technical stuff, or blasting 80+mph. In my opinion, the V4S would benefit from the same strategy.
  11. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    I don't mean to be an a** hole, but it sounds like you're exploring the edge case and I'm 100% fine with the gearing. If you're doing that kind of stuff on your Multi, spend the money you're saving up to replace plastics / radiator bits / case pieces when you dump your Multi on rocks on a nice KTM 790 adv. or Yamaha Tenere. Both of those are a lot lighter and probably more fun when the road turns to enduro trail.
    If you enjoy ice skating uphill, that's good - I know a friend who was DETERMINED to do everything the enduro guys did on his F800GS - but don't blame the bike for being what it is for its primary use case.

    Edit - I see you have a husky 501, I have a KTM 500. Have you ridden any of KTM's big bikes on the same stuff that you took your Multi? I had an 1190 R (and now a 790 adv) and I'm amazed at how KTM's big bikes "feel" similar to the enduros on dirt (just bigger / heavier) but at some point on a big bike, the bike is riding you and you're sailing over rough / whoops stuff and the bike's gonna do what it does. I would not subject a Multi to that, but that's me.
  12. Steve_A

    Steve_A n00b

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    OK, you make some good points. But your logic is a little too simple. The bike is marketed as an Adventure Bike, so that means off-road. The trip I mentioned, we had a KTM 1090, a BMW 800 and my shiny new V4S. We said "no single track, and if the dirt roads get too tough, we turnaround". Two of us were expert dirt riders. What tends to happen is you hit a section that's marginal, you soldier on, hit a few more marginal sections and get through, then someone crashes and can't make it or you decide, this is probably enough but then you have to manage a turnaround (which can be tough) and get back through the marginal sections. Once you "Adventure" off-road without detailed knowledge of the road/trail ahead, you just have to deal with it. And I'm much more comfortable blasting through stuff at speed with it than navigating technical sections with boulders, slippery mudholes, gnarly hill climbs that a rancher can take with his 4-wheel drive pickup. Speed somewhat nullifies the mass and "tippiness", but it's on full display when you hit sections where you wish you were on a proper dirt bike. Back to the original point--a lower first gear would be useful when you hit these situations. And a higher top gear would be useful for highway (and to improve the range). I'm not condemning the bike, just suggesting an improvement for upcoming years...
  13. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    I understand and agree, but my point is, the bike (and sounds like you the rider) CAN do it, but it's not the ideal use case and it will require some work. Your description of the ride is an edge case for offroad for the Multi, IMHO.
    The press bikes all were out here east of SD in Ocotillo Wells area on flat sand trails and jumps, where they can wick up the speed and kick the tail out, and the bike does pretty well - but sand = speed for riding. I think that, plus fast fire road / two track is the primary dirt use case, hence my point of the gearing is decent for what the bike is.
  14. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    When riding the V4S in a spirited fashion, the pegs will touch down before the panniers. :D
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  15. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    Thank you for this. :)
  16. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    On my 1200 the pegs, sidestand AND bash plate would all touch down before the panniers. Even the massive 73 jobs I usually ran if I had panniers on it at all.

    I regularly had guys ask how I was keeping up with them because they though they were flying I would show them the ground down portions on the sides of the bashplates from leaning that long girl down far enough to keep up the corner speed.

    Miss that bike.
  17. supernova12034

    supernova12034 n00b

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  18. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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  19. AlexFIA

    AlexFIA Adventurer Supporter

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    Has anyone purchased the SW-Motech crash bars and compared them to the Ducati version. I like the factory ones that I’ve seen at the dealer, but not the $600 price tag. I’ve been happy with SW-Motech in the past on other bikes. They were previously shown as shipping from Germany, but now unavailable.
  20. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Nope, but I am interested in learning about the SW-Motech aluminum bash plate, and would (like you) appreciate hearing from anyone who has purchased one.