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ebook cookbook?

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by MontanaPaul, Feb 22, 2020.

  1. MontanaPaul

    MontanaPaul Adventurer

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    I like the idea of eating something not made by pouring boiling water over mostly chemicals in a plastic bag - those days are in the rear view mirror for me (I know the adjusta-fork guys are even more pure). Plus, what else are you going to in the hours left after making camp ? (but before the single malt)

    I'm seeking practical, on the road recipes (stable, easy to find and carry ingredients), so not a general cookbook. I've bought Dirty Dining by Lisa Thomas -very helpful and great experience/perspective, but in the end (after the equipment bit up front) its only 10 or so recipes.

    The ideal would be a pdf ebook focused on road trip camping/cooking that could live on your phone or tablet.
    Anyone have any nominations?
    #1
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  2. Urbandrag

    Urbandrag KLiM Beotch!

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    Nice topic. Now watching!
    There are many ebooks about camping cooking.
    I also found boy scouts ebooks are also usefull in this subject.
    #2
  3. Gedrog

    Gedrog 1000 mile stare a 1000 stories to tell

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  4. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    :lol3

    Have you read any of the recipes? Most include fresh meat and an array of finely chopped spices. Those don't strike me as ADV-style meals.

    I know I'm no cook, but is there anyone on a motorcycle cooking those recipes? Too many ingredients and too many ingredients which require refrigeration.

    I'm always on the lookout for good things to cook on a trip, that's why I clicked on this thread. And I was pretty excited to see the series of recipes from Kylie, but after reading through a handful of the recipes, I found them to be entirely unfeasible for a multi-day/week/month motorcycle trip.

    Jamie
    #4
  5. MontanaPaul

    MontanaPaul Adventurer

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    Jamie - exactly my point, thanks

    a) Needs to be in e-book form (not a URL); we're hopefully out of internet range in the AMZ

    b) I don't want to have to stop and buy fresh things every day, and may not even be able to.
    If you can carry sufficient fuel, and filter water along the way, it can be 2-3 days before hitting a real town again (eg GCBAR)

    c) I choose not to do freeze dried - it's expensive, often not tasty, and full of non food. Besides, what's the rush? YMMV

    I've started collecting a list of ingredients which can be carried many days without a cooler. Some are surprising:
    cured meats: salami, prosciutto, chorizo, bacon, jerky/ biltong
    canned meats: spam, tuna, sardines (although I'm not really a fan of cans due to mess, weight and waste)
    veggies: potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squashes, corn, onion, beans, garlic. Mushrooms can go 2-3 days
    flat breads: chapatis, tortillas
    starch: rice, pastas, Chinese-style noodles (ie Ramen)
    hard cheeses: Parmesan, Romano, Asiago​

    no refrigeration required, but hard to pack: tree fruits (apples, pears, plums, oranges), tomatoes

    misc good stuff: hot peppers, nuts, butter (yes! clarified; aka ghee), eggs (yes! if they've never been refrigerated)
    dried herbs/seasonings: I use a weekly pill holder to keep 7 main seasonings (salt, pepper, cinnamon, curry, basil, etc. ) sufficient for a single trip
    misc sauces etc: peanut butter, honey, ketchup, mustard, Worcestershire, BBQ , soy, hot , creamer (for coffee). many of these can be acquired in perfect storage form at fast food places.

    packets of seasonings are helpful: gravy, soup, taco, rice. super lightweight too.

    Looking at the lists above, it's clear you can eat tasty, nourishing and inexpensive meals using non-perishable items only.

    My breakfasts are almost like home - pancakes with butter and maple syrup, or eggs and cured bacon, always French press coffee. If you're up by 6:30, you can still be on the road by 8
    Lunches are generally snack-types: nuts, breads, orange; as there's no time or inclination to do more.
    Dinners are where I have time to prepare, time to enjoy, and time to clean up. It makes the single malt or brandy that much more enjoyable.

    Maybe there's no cookbook that focuses solely on non-perishable ingredients in pdf form. I was hoping one of the inmates knew of one or more, and save me the trouble.
    After more Googling, I did find a lot of prepper-type recipes, but they often focused on canned foods. Not bike friendly...
    Failing that, it's not a tremendous task to collect recipes in a word doc and save to pdf, and then save on a phone or tablet. And that task can be on-going.
    #5
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  6. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    You might check out cookbooks for backpacking
    #6
  7. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I’d be interested in any personal recommendations.

    In the past I’ve bought a couple backpacking/camping cookbooks, only to find them to be mostly about preparing food at home to carry into the field, or using dehydrated foods, or cooking over an open fire. Or they’re aimed at car campers with multiple-burner stoves, coolers, and bunches of fresh meats and vegetables.

    I’ve been trying to find a good source of simple, non-gourmet, motorcycle-friendly, camp recipes that I can make on a stove, with just a couple/few non-perishable ingredients.

    Pasta. Rice. Tortillas. Noodles.

    I’m really trying to expand my travel diet beyond canned soup and ramen.

    Jamie
    #7
  8. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    It's been a while since I saw the book Gorp, glop, and glue stew, but my memory says it had some 1-burner recipes. It was published just after the '70s backpacking boom. I've just requested it on ILL, so I can tell you more next week.

    For an electronic book, I'd think that the index or ingredient search would be very important.
    #8
  9. MontanaPaul

    MontanaPaul Adventurer

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    Hey Grinnin - that book sounds promising, I look forward to you following up after you get it.
    re search function - for my purposes, I would scan through the document to plan meals and make a pre-trip shopping list.
    Then while traveling would follow the recipes.

    It would be rare for me to get ingredients first, then plan meals around what I have. However, I"m planning on the GCBAR this year, and that may be what happens!
    I am not familiar with the more advanced features (eg search) of pdfs or e-book formats (eg EPUB, MOBI). I should check into that before I decide what format to save it in
    #9
  10. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    I'll look on my bookcase when I get home
    #10
  11. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    #11
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  12. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    When you're out more than a week, it's hard to buy all the foods near home. Over a month and it's much, much harder.

    So my puzzle has often been: "I'm in this tiny store that has a small selection of foods I never eat. How can I put together some meals for between here and the next store that will be appetizing enough that I want to eat them and more-or-less nutritious?"

    So in a store with dismal selection, a guide to camp cooking might help select the ingredients that would make a few decent meals.

    I don't usually have a huge problem since I cook daily and don't use cookbooks. I have many cookbooks and get them out of the library often. They provide ideas to fold into the general mix of my cooking, not usually recipes to follow since I have to make several substitutions in most recipes.

    That's also what I'll be looking for from Gorp, glop, and glue stew, more ideas to fold into my usual cooking mix.
    #12
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  13. SEK_Nick

    SEK_Nick Been here awhile

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    I was just thinking of this today, and here is a thread!

    I am thinking along the lines of being able to buy food daily or so out on BDR trips. I purchased a soft side cooler that i think should keep cold for a day or so.

    My primary head scratcher on this subject is cooking within the constraints of a 5 to 6" skillet and pot with just the backpacking stove, not necessarily the ingredients or food availability.
    #13
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  14. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    There is already a thread on this, on the first page here no less.

    Leave anything that will read an ebook at home fer crisskes.

    In terms of nutrition very little is needed. A bag of granola and another of gorp are good for a month. Make the gorp with cashews, not peanuts. Most often food is used for psychological reasons---comfort and entertainment. Carry chocolate for comfort and a very good malt for entertainment (or some rotgut if you just want to get shitfaced for cheap). Carry a paperback for entertainment. if the sounds in your head bother you and you need to keep them drowned out, get help.

    The adjustafork crowd isn't more 'pure', just more full of themselves. If they knew trail cookery they would leave the silly things home.
    #14
  15. SEK_Nick

    SEK_Nick Been here awhile

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    But the voices tell me funny stories.
    #15
  16. MontanaPaul

    MontanaPaul Adventurer

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    "In terms of nutrition very little is needed." not much to say to that...
    For those who know there's more to life than washing down peanuts with booze, stay tuned.
    #16
  17. juno

    juno Long timer

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    I have a thought. Start picking any recipes now and practice then so you know them when it’s time to travel. In other words, learn to cook.
    I am not a great cook but I can make something delicious out of anything I can find. I keep it simple so it’s not a big stretch to cook what I want on the road.
    #17
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  18. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    Who said anything about washing peanuts down with booze? If you cannot read a cookbook will do you no good

    If you cannot cook a cookbook will also do you no good. A book a cook does not make. The basics are mastery of the elemental ingredients of a number of cuisines...and the more third world oriented the better (they do not depend on refrigeration). If you can handle minute rice, cous-cous, bisquick, lentils and cornmeal (polenta grind) you are set. The rest is side dishes and toppings. The recipes for all the pastas (except bulk cous-cous) are on the sides of the box. Minute rice, pasta and dried potatoes are featured in the backpacking cookbooks because they are light, compact and hard to screw up. But if you want to eat well know what al dente means.

    I also went through 3 pages of Kylies recipies. Far more babbling blogger than cook. Can't carry butter? Ever hear of ghee? Thinks cous-cous is a grain? Fail, it's a durum wheat pasta, And for a puplished author someone ought to tell the kid that the contraction of "you are" is "you're". No shortage of them.

    I'm on the mailing list for Whole Spice in napa valley. So I get to hear about the specials and they tuck in recipes. While Kylie seems to know about "morrocan spice" Whole Spice has dozens of them, all ground and blended up fresh.

    I eat a lot of curries at home. I can no longer eat carbohydrate so I use Shiritake pasta but that stuff won't go on the road (or I haven't figured out how. Takes lot of water to rinse, wants to be cool). I use Curry paste at home, mostly Pateks but that comes in 1 lb glass jrs. So a half a jar is plenty for one but it is a day one or two deal without ice. I like plenty of nuts and dried fruit in my curry so cashews and currants. These are the backbone of gorp, just pack the M&Ms separately.

    But here is one of my favorite back-in-the day recipes:

    PASTA MIZITHRA AL LA PLAKA

    Some pasta. Spaghetti is fast but whatever one is packing.

    Coarsely grated Mizithra cheese. Prepare at home and put in bag. I use a microplane. A lot is needed, it is the sauce, not a topping.

    olive oil.

    Good drinking sherry. I prefer a sweet sherry like Harveys Bristol Cream.

    Brown the cheese in some olive oil. It will not melt. set aside. make the spaghetti, drain but do not rinse. Toss with a bit of olive oil. Mix in cheese and drizzle with sherry. Done. Drink the remainder of the sherry for desert with fresh or dried apricots..
    #18
  19. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    As an alternative to an e-book with a bunch of recipes you will probably never use. Why not just choose any of the multitude of recipe apps available for the OS of your choice, many of which are free. Then, just compile your own "e-book". Most of the apps are simple copy and paste for recipes and even pictures of what the final product should look like. Browse the web for specific types of recipes, see a recipe you think you might like, copy it into the app. This way you only have the recipes you are actually interested in/use, you can easily edit the recipes to suit your taste, you can try them and if you don't expect to ever use it again, delete it. No clutter and streamlined specifically for you
    #19
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  20. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    I agree. But it is important to use the pots and stove that will be used on the road. The tinny road pots will not cook like a good heavy kitchen pot. The stove will have hot spots that the kitchen range does not. So some things will work better than others. Simple boil it and eat it recipes are the most resilient. If there are multiple items to be cooked it can be good to do them sequentially eating each as it is finished. Done correctly there is no pot to clean.
    #20