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El largo camino a Florida

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by ScotsFire, Mar 12, 2021.

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  1. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    April 1, 2021: Not April Fools (likely just a fool generally)

    237 miles
    Map 0401.jpg

    I dig Campeche. One day I think I'd like to spend more time there. But for now we got up relatively early (by @NotaYinzer standards) and had a nice breakfast before loading up and hitting the road.
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    Loving the full face helmet/sunglasses tan.

    We weren't in a rush, so avoided the cuota highways which also got us closer to the Gulf shore.
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    Notice the hills in the distance. This was by no means a flat, boring ride.

    Stopped a few times just to look around.
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    Get a little sand on the boots.
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    Lot more pics of me with a partner traveler.

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    This is the real economic driver through this area.
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    Oil industry.

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    The shoreline towns all had great views. Having a pillion with a camera has some advantages.
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    Did I mention we weren't in a rush?
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    Stopped for refreshments at the Bahia Tortuga. Lot better amenities than at the town of Bahia Tortuga in Baja California.

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    Water is a lot different color too.

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    No complaints on my part.
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    Was feeling the "No bad days" vibe. But it might have been the sweat.

    We turned inland shortly afterwards.
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    Still some water crossings as we went further south.
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    The mountains around Palenque drew closer as we rode.
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    Lot more agriculture and mixed land use too.

    Ended the day similar to how we started, with a good meal.
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    With VEGGIES no less!

    It ended up being another hot one, but more tolerable as there was quite a bit of cloud cover. We did manage to beat the rain to Palenque, and we actually had to move tables at our 2nd floor veranda seat at the restaurant as the skies opened up during supper. Impressive if rather unseasonable rain storm (first of several for us as it turned out).
  2. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    Oh yeah, a funny thing happened on the way to Palenque.

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  3. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    Nice @ScotsFire! Been wondering what you two have been getting into since your post from the 6th; the pics from your ride along the coast are fantastic man. And I had a good laugh about the comparison between Bahia Tortuga on the mainland and that on Baja - definitely a few more amenities in your pic...lol.

    Nice little teaser on whatever happened on the way to Palenque. You guys end up lost or something :lol2 :lol2. Or maybe something to do with liquid sunshine?

    Totally unrelated, don't remember what your return plans are for getting back to ID, but if you need a place to stay on the way back, I'm not too far off I5. Imagine you'll be on the east side of the Cascades, but it's an option should you need it.

    Look forward to what comes next! Keep the knobby side down and the pics and story coming :D :D
    simbaboy and ScotsFire like this.
  4. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    April 1 through 17, 2021: The disclosure

    Yeah, not so much. @liv2day you're aware of some of my previous rides. Getting lost is more of an opportunity than anything. No, these difficulties are solely of my own making.

    North of Palenque, at the intersections of MX186 and MX199 is a very modern checkpoint. It does have the normal abundance of heavily armed personnel, but also personnel from the Aduana and Banjercito offices (Customs). They also have a computerized scanner that looks at your license plate and will sound an alarm is something is amiss. I know this as it sounded as I rode through.

    The reason it was set off was that I had in fact NOT acquired my TVIP (Temporary Vehicle Importation Permit) upon entering Mexico. I had tried to get one just south of Nogales, but was denied one due to some documentation issues. Ultimately, though amazingly quickly, I decided that rather than return to the USA and fix these issues, I would take the risk of getting into an accident being randomly checked. One factor, not a good one, was that I already felt pressed for time to get to Cancun for that flight to Florida and figured it would cost me a few days, and potentially returning home to the Northwest, to get things fixed.

    The person that "caught" me of course did not speak English, but fortunately had a co-worker that did. They did a lot of fast Spanish speaking that was way beyond my abilities, threatened to confiscate the bike then and there (certainly legal to do so), almost just sent me back into Tabasco so I could not continue to Palenque, and finally gave me one option. I would proceed to El Ceibo at the Guatamala border and obtain the correct documentation, though I was allowed to proceed to Palenque to stay for the night. Vicki and I agreed that the agent was leaning towards confiscation, but the co-worker talked her down.

    Leaving @NotaYinzer in Palenque and riding to El Ceibo the next morning, I didn't have a whole lot of hope I'd actually get the TVIP but would try again. Correct! The Banjercito is extremely professional and competent, and therefore did not issue me one. I asked if I could store the bike in order to fix the issues, and they were very specific: I would take the moto to Tenosique for storage, but no further.

    Slight backtrack: Tenosique is around 35 miles northwest of the border, and while it's not exactly a "destination" town, it's a damn sight nicer than El Ceibo. El Ceibo is one of the only communities that I instantly had a ton of bad vibes from riding through. Then I was accosted by some young man as I waited for the border crossing to open. I think he was mostly showing off for his buddies, but I was glad the border guards were within sight. I think the Banjercito folks were well aware that if I tried to store the bike in El Ceibo, there wouldn't be anything when I got back to issue a permit for.

    SOOO, I found a automotive electrician (through the motorcycle parts store) that agreed to store the bike in his shop. Victor and his friend Benito were absolutely the typical kind of Mexican that I've experienced. Friendly and will go out of their way to help out.

    Took a mini-bus back to Palenque to reunite with Vicki and come up with a plan. The biggest stress I was feeling was that I had ruined her precious and rare vacation time. But she is a trooper and we adjusted to the new reality, and carried on. We continued with as much of our plans as possible, going to Tuxtla Gutierrez and Oaxaca. I won't be putting up much from this time as we were NOT riding, and this is a ride report. Though I'll throw up a bit from Canyon de Sumidero and a mezcal tour we took as those were things we were going to do anyway. Mostly we just slowed down and enjoyed wherever we were at.

    After she flew back home from Oaxaca, I went to Villahermosa. I chose there as it was a short bus ride to Tenosique, and a large enough city that shipping the documents I needed would be easier. It was also a city we spent one night in previously and it was interesting enough to spend some time there.

    Anyway, upon receiving the necessary documents in a longer than anticipated time (see below), I went to Tenosique, retrieved my bike, rode back down to El Ceibo and got my TVIP. A happy ending I probably didn't deserve.

    Therefore (not necessarily in order of importance):
    • I am an idiot. I have bragged about using risk/benefit analysis in the past, but royally botched it this time.
    • I am an idiot. All of this mess could easily have been avoided if I'd taken care of business before leaving.
    • I am extremely fortunate. The Mexican Government could have a new (to them) motorcycle to issue to some police agency somewhere. They gave me a chance to fix things. I am very thankful.
    • I am incredibly lucky. The woman that has somehow decided (even despite this recent evidence) that I was worth hanging out with was not angry nor judgmental (yes there was some disappointment for a short while). She said that travel was all about growth and learning lessons. She did note that "I didn't think this was a lesson YOU would need to learn..." But that was the end of it. We still had an awesome time because of her great attitude.
    I'll be in Villahermosa for a couple more days as I have some video conferencing/training I need to participate in and the internet seems reasonably reliable here. In that time I'll try to get caught up with the non-moto time, and the last couple days of riding. You didn't think that I'd get my bike back and not spend quality time with it did you?

    Otherwise, please feel free to comment below. Thanks for all your support, and stick around if you want more poor decision making.
    HiJincs, Animo, roadcapDen and 8 others like this.
  5. akaDigger

    akaDigger Amateur Adventurer

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    Karma? Serendipity? Shit house luck?

    Carry on!
  6. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    April 5, 2021: Canyon de Sumidero

    This was one of the few things @NotaYinzer had firmly on her target list. It was the main reason we went to Tuxtla Gutierrez in the first place. We booked a tour through our hotel. It started with a bus ride north to Osumacinta. Come to find out that most of the tours start in Tuxtla Gutierrez and run the canyon northward, then return. I'm not sure how I feel about taking a bus one way, but it all worked out. We met a couple of French guys traveling with an Austrian girl on the bus. Kind of cool talking with them about their observations of Mexico, COVID, and lots of other things.

    It was a beautiful sunny day.
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    So of course I focused on the fire in the hills across the reservoir. It looks cloudy is many of these pics, but the sun was strong all day.

    The canyon is filled with a reservoir behind a hydroelectric dam. This statue commemorates the workers that built it.
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    There were floating concessions out by the dam.
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    These are mostly for the boats coming from TG, but we stopped too.

    I bet they have a nice view.
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    Maybe we can look into working remotely from there, Vicki?

    Entering the canyon.
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    European heads and feet at no extra charge.

    Lots of neat geology.
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    Up close and personal
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    Tour boats going the other way.
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    There was also a shrine built into one of the cliff faces.
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    It's impressive.

    As interesting is the wildlife.
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    Avian action photography still a skill I'm working on...
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    Look close.
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    Closer
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    There were a few of these Great Egrets
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    But most importantly...
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    NOOO! Those aren't monkeys! Those are vultures.

    THOSE are monkeys.
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    AAAAAAND, CHECK! Another of Vicki's list items completed. Seeing monkeys in the wild.

    And it shows.
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    After the couple hour boat ride, we were informed that we had to wait for the bus to come pick us up. An hour and a half in a market style shopping area.
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    We did see some more (not-so) wildlife there. Mostly we drank beer with the French and Austrians. And wandered around.
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    It did seem suspicious that they person telling us we had to wait for the bus, was the guy that drove it to Osumacinta, and did NOT get on the boat with us.

    Overall though, the trip through the canyon was worth the effort (and even the bus ride). The good company (and I'm not talking about Europeans) made it better.
    Animo, simbaboy, Oldmanx and 5 others like this.
  7. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    Surely the last. Undeservedly so.

    Carrying on.
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  8. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Noticed the plastic trash near the cocdrillo , a pity it is. This is all garbage coming downriver from as far as Guatemala .All of I t eventually winds up at the screens of the dam.
    A couple of years back it got so bad that they shut down the tours for a spell and sent a team of skimmer boats into the lake and they wound up sieving out truckloads of flotsam plastic .

    With a taxi north out of TG you could have visited the overviews of the canyon too . A0ECE4EC-F256-4382-9247-0B54B489E59B.jpeg 7FACE168-4646-44AF-B707-1E83F49585FF.jpeg
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    Lots of scenic country and roads run out at Osumacinta
    Where about are you riding now ?
    HiJincs, Animo, chilejack and 2 others like this.
  9. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    Yeah, that chunk of blue plastic really sticks out in that pic. There was quite a bit of trash in the water throughout the canyon.

    I’m still in Villahermosa for a couple days getting some video conferencing/training taken care of. Expect to be on the road to start north on Wednesday. A guy I rode with yesterday suggested a road that goes most of the way up Citlaltepeltl, which is kinda on the way to Puebla which I'd like to see. So that may be where I start to meander towards. No pressing timeline, so expect to take up to three weeks to get back to the border. I've got a short list of things I want to see, but can hit those I miss this time on a future ride, including some in the Tuxtla Gutierrez region.

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    Spring is coming at home. Daffodils I planted in remembrance of my mom. (Pic from @NotaYinzer )
  10. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    April 8, 2021: Drink up Johnny!

    We were picked up in the morning by René, the owner of Las Bugambilias Tours, for a Mezcal tour out of Oaxaca down to the town of Santiago Matatlan, home to quite a few artisanal mezcal distilleries. Right up front: hiring a tour is the way to do this. A good tour guide has built relationships with the distillers, getting you great access. As well, having a designated driver for this is necessary.

    Our first stop was an agave field.
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    This is espadin, the most commonly used agave for mezcal. It's also the most commonly cultivated.

    One of the "wild" agave, which I didn't note the name of.
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    Still pretty young, these are encouraged to grow where possible, but mostly are harvested from the hillsides and open desert.

    View towards a distillery, which we did not visit.
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    Very much a sensible shoes kind of day.
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    The pretty cactus without the distraction of gringos.
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    Entering town where the three distilleries we visited were.
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    "Mezcal Capital of the World"

    I'm going to go through the distillation process, though these pictures are from three different distilleries. First the agave is harvested.
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    The core is what is brought to the distillery. These are espadin which take around eight years to mature. Other agave are larger or smaller, but most take longer to be ready to harvest, sometimes 15 to 25 years.

    These are quartered and then baked in pit ovens. This one empty.
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    Oven being prepared to cook.
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    The pulp from later in the process is used to protect the agave from direct flame impingement.

    This one settling after the burn period.
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    It takes a few days to correctly cook the agave.

    After it is baked, it is allowed to cool for a couple of days.
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    At these small distilleries, all this work is done by hand.

    The only thing sort of automated is the crushing.
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    This horse hung a left while I was taking these pictures and walked right up to me looking for pets or a snack. The juice and mash is collected...

    ...and placed into wooden vats to ferment.
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    No yeast is added. It starts naturally with environmental inputs. The pulp rises to the top and is removed while the liquid continues to bubble away.

    The fermented liquid is then distilled at least twice.
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    The distilled hooch is then either bottled, or stored while a government agency tests it. Mezcal is tested if it's going to be exported or distributed away from the distillery. I was surprised how little mezcal is barrel aged. But after tasting a bunch of non-aged mezcal, I couldn't complain about it. It comes out much smoother than whiskey which needs the time in a barrel to learn to behave itself.

    It's then bottled.
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    This was at the largest of the three we visited. It had quite a large bottling and distribution warehouse.
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    The smallest was pretty much out of their garage.
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    Then the best parts.
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    René serving up tastes and giving us some information on the variants. The distillery owner's daughter watching. I think normally, that 13 year old is the one slinging the booze.

    At our second stop.
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    All those glasses were ours. Thus the need for a driver. We did also drink at the third stop, but I was way past caring about pictures of bottles and glasses at that point.

    Beautiful day to sip mezcal.
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    René also took us to a local restaurant for lunch (between stops two and three). Great meals. As I mentioned earlier, the biggest thing that made the tour so enjoyable was being able to take advantage of the relationships that René has built over the years. That Vicki and I were the only participants made it even better. I very much encourage you to hire a guide if you want to check out the distilleries. Well worth it.
  11. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    Damn @ScotsFire - that's one hell of a memorable adventure within the overall adventure. Really glad everything was sorted and you still have the Beemer as part of your corral! And life lessons - they can be painful. It's great to hear this one just involved "lost" time and temporary (if painful) disappointment.

    Hell man, that'll be something you don't forget for a long time. And I'll bet all future travel will have the necessary paperwork, whether it's MX or some other country...lol.

    Like the title you used on this update :lol2 :lol2 :lol2

    Going to catch up on what you've been up to since getting your bike back :D :D
    simbaboy and ScotsFire like this.
  12. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    I completely enjoy riding pics, scenery pics, food pics, beach pics, monkey pics, and most everything in between. But this @ScotsFire - so DAMN cool. What a crazy neat process to go from the agave plant to mezcal; especially cooking in those pits.

    I'm really curious - did any of the distillery folks talk about how they get different varieties? Is it based on the region where the agave is grown (ala highlands Scotch vs Islay) or how do they get to the different types? The wooden casks they're aged in?

    Having a whisky problem myself (not really, but kinda); I had a hard laugh about your comment on aging to make it behave itself. So true.

    Excellent update man, even sans 2-wheeled transport.
    simbaboy likes this.
  13. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    From the little education I’ve recently received and the tad bit of tasting guided by Rene, the varietals are chiefly based upon the different agave, which I’m told is also the primary difference between mezcal and tequila (other than the region it was made in). Some recipes call for triple distillation, but most are the minimum two.
    Aging barrels may be either virgin charred oak (like bourbon uses) or “used” barrels from other liquor aging. Among the few bottles we purchased on the tour was one barrel aged.

    The various wild agave grows in differing biospheres around the central Mexico region. It sounds like harvesters are sent out to locate it. Since it takes so long to mature, years and years, only being ready to cook when it starts to have it’s one in a lifetime bloom, and then needs to sit a few weeks after having the bloom stalk cut off, I’m sure locations have been long determined prior to harvest.

    Growing up in Kentucky Bourbon Country, it was neat to see the commonalities and differences with whiskey.
  14. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Re : interesting tour of the drug lab

    BDD6ED61-382B-4E74-95BF-B444211BDAD9.jpeg
    And there is the problem for the wild agave which is now becoming a threatened species , because of the growing export demand . On wild acreage patches of brush are cleared for evermore agave cultivation disrupting rare environments to be ruined and abandoned after a few crops . Not unlike the proliferation of plastic flotsam , an outcome of commerce .
    ScotsFire likes this.
  15. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    Rene actually discussed this. Another issue with some species of wild agave is the flowers are used for displays on some religious celebrations, leading to further over harvesting.
    simbaboy likes this.
  16. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    April 2 through 16: The guilt free version

    Some observations and overview of the moto free period. Firstly, we took the bus system to travel to Villahermosa, Tuxtla Gutierrez, and Oaxaca. We did about half and half Sprinter van style and full tour buses. The smaller ones were just fine, though the first one from Tenosique to Palenque had been run a lot harder than the rest. Pretty bumpy ride in the back. Most of the full size ones were built by Volvo, and the smaller ones mostly various brands I didn't recognize, though one was a Nissan. These aren't recycled vehicles from the US (for the most part anyway) and were clean. We didn't have any issues, but I've seen busses here and there broke down with all the passengers out along the side of the road waiting for another bus on occasion, so maintenance might not be the best.
    Using the bus system gave us more confidence in traveling around as there's a pretty good back-up system in place to get around in case of a moto breakdown or injury. There were usually multiple options on time of departures, though the longer ride from Tuxtla Gutierrez to Oaxaca (ten hours overnight) was more limited. The drivers seemed competent, though certainly products of their environment. Vehicles do things differently here, and busses are not an exception. There were a couple of passing situations that made me cringe a little.

    We did look into renting a car. Prices seem very reasonable on-line at some vendors, but when you show up the requirements for insurance exponentially increase, and also you're supposed to make a deposit of around ten percent of the vehicle price. It would have been nearly $2000 USD to get on the road, admittedly for ten or twelve days. Bus system looked even better after that.

    There wasn't a city we didn't enjoy. Vicki was a little challenged in Palenque the day I went to El Ceibo as she'd been relying on my barely passable Spanish to get by. But she said it gave her a lot more confidence that she'd get by on her own if needed. Also provided some additional incentive to work on Spanish at home. She's traveled a lot before and I learned as much from her as otherwise.

    It's political season with the upcoming elections in Mexico.
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    We saw several marches as we traveled, and speakers on corners among other "live" political advertising.

    Tuxtla Gutierrez
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    We stayed near the centro, and there was no lack of urban environment.

    Some murals in TG.
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    We also got another box checked.
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    "Wild" parrots. Yes, parakeets are parrots, and these Green Parakeets are way bigger than the parakeets kept as pets. They act and sound similar though.

    Oaxaca
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    Lots of great colonial architecture.

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    I couldn't really get too great of detail, but this is a great city to visit. Nice vibe.
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    Lots to do, and a decent night life considering the pandemic.
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    Even some live music!
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    There were a couple of afternoon/evening storms, which made some cool cloud formations.
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    And some wet times.
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    Lots of lightning with this storm.
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    We both really liked Oaxaca, and want to spend more time there. But that said, there hasn't been any towns or cities we didn't like. I probably wouldn't go back to Cancun, but mostly because the things I enjoyed there are better available at the other places.

    The biggest disappointments were that many of the "smaller" attractions, such as most museums or specialty parks (the TG arboretum) are closed due to COVID. The rational seems odd as there were plenty of gathering places still operating, such as centros and larger non-essential item stores. But as @NotaYinzer likes to say, "No one starves in Mexico." Always somewhere open to eat, if it might be a street vendor.

    There was quite a variety of COVID responses too. In Villahermosa, you can't order alcohol at a restaurant unless you're getting food. And all fully indoor eating establishments have to be closed by 7pm. Everything was open till way past when we would be up in Oaxaca, and no restrictions on booze. Nearly everywhere was checking temperatures and globbing sanitizer on hands upon entry, with lots of shoe baths too. Masks are nearly universally worn.

    As much as we had planned a different experience, we weren't too disappointed in how things ended up.
    HiJincs, roadcapDen, simbaboy and 7 others like this.
  17. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

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    April 17, 2021: Back in the saddle again

    192 miles
    Map 0417.jpg

    After the aforementioned drama taken care of in El Ceibo, I found myself on a really sexy motorcycle with a full tank of fuel and nowhere specifically to be. What a wonderful feeling!

    A little north of El Ceibo.
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    Northeast: flat grassland and jungle.

    Soutwest: BOOM! Hills!
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    Opposite sides of the road in one spot.

    After a happy phone call to Vicki, and a quick look at Google Maps (always good for unintended adventures) I decided to avoid the main highways as much as possible on my way back to Villahermosa.

    Crossing the Usamacina River.
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    One thing that caught my eye was the Pomoná Archeological Zone.
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    DENIED! Another COVID closure.

    (Video 16 seconds)


    Taking the southern route to Palenque.
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    It amazes me that the cattle are so skinny around here. The grazing is lush, but must not be very nutritious.

    Stopped, hydrated, and fueled in the city of Palenque, before heading up to the big zona arqueologica. It was closed, and the gatekeeper didn't want to let me through. I didn't want to visit pyramids (mostly), I was trying to get to a side road to continue west. It took a few minutes of showing him my route on the phone for him to let me through. ("No, Villahermosa is THAT way!") I tried not to read too much into his reluctance to let me go.

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    Promising!
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    Though with some minor infrastructure needs.
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    Lots of ranch lands, especially where it was flatter.
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    This was really helping take the edge off, even with it being around a hundred degrees.
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    Not a bad little spread.
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    AND it kept getting hillier.
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    I had to take it pretty easy as the rear tire is pretty much done, and there were lots of local motorcycles and horse riders on the roads.
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    I didn't mind.

    The Rio Xanil
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    A little further down stream, near Salto de Agua (Water Jump?)
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    One last look at the hills before the flat line to Villahermosa.
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    I was pooped and wrung out from the heat by the time I got back to my hotel after several hours of riding. But still had a shit eating grin on my face knowing my bike was outside the room.
    HiJincs, roadcapDen, simbaboy and 6 others like this.
  18. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town... Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,626
    Location:
    Here and there... but more there than here
    April 18, 2021: Group therapy

    206 miles
    Map 0418.jpg

    Earlier in the week, I had made a remark on FB about how much CCR I've been hearing in Mexico, wondering if it was actually popular here or if it got put on when a gringo came in. Jesus Leon saw that, and the checked in location of Villahermosa, and reached out offering help if I needed anything. Did I mention he owns the KTM/Ducati/Polaris dealership in Villahermosa (and Merida for that matter)? I stopped in one afternoon to chat and look for a tire (which he had a Metzler Karoo 3 in stock in my size). During the conversation, he mentioned that a bunch of the local riders usually went for a ride on Sundays. And there I was with a motorcycle and not much to do. Hmmmm.

    The ride was supposed to start at 8. I was there a few minutes aforehand finding no one there. After a little bit, Armando showed up on his 2019 F750GS. He got a call shortly after that the main group had already left and he should catch up. OK then, lets go.

    After running back and forth across town pretty quickly (glad I'm not the only one that forgets things...) we got out into the banana plantations headed south.
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    I had neglected to tell Armando about my propensity for stopping for photos, so had to settle for some screen grabs off some video for the outbound leg.

    Run whatcha brung, I suppose.
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    When mamma needs some propane for cooking, you go get some propane.

    Pulling screenshots got old pretty quick, so I just buckled down and made the damn video.
    (Video 4:30 - with music)


    We hit the restaurant where the group had already arrived for an early lunch.
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    That's Armando kneeling in the front. He was definitely one of the jokers of the group.

    I told everyone to not wait for me as I'd be stopping for photos quite a bit.
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    So I did.

    Really stunning views and incredible riding.
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    I did bail off the pavement for a short while trying to get some different shots.
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    Plus some fun, if slow and bumpy riding.

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    An interesting, if sturdy bridge.
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    And a happy scooter back at the hotel.
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    It was some of the best roads on the trip as far as pavement goes. Making me look for more squiggly lines on the map heading north.

    If you are in need of some moto work, Super Cycle Sports has a full shop with Ducati and KTM certified mechanics. They'll work on BMW's as necessary. It was nice finding a tire in stock somewhere. The Motoz Tractionator GPS I had on didn't last quite as long as the previous two. Got an early oil change while it was there. Shop rates seem reasonable. Jesus is a friendly guy. His family also runs a dealership in Houston too.
  19. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,839
    Location:
    Sherwood, Oregon
    Frickin' awesome @ScotsFire! How sweet to hook up with some locals and head out for a rip, have lunch with 'em, and then get to take your time getting back so you can stop for photos and enjoy the scenery at your pace.

    Thoroughly enjoyed the video man; likely the camera perspective, but holy f*ck it looks like you nearly clipped him as he stopped for that semi. At least you stopped to help him pick up his bike after you likely caused him to fall...LOL. I keed.

    What a great day to be on two wheels, enjoying the Mexican countryside. Envious. And new knobs on the rear so you can keep finding those hidden gems off the beaten track.

    Look forward to what comes next, keep the knobby side down man.
    simbaboy and ScotsFire like this.
  20. Animo

    Animo Been n00b awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    12,250
    Location:
    Playa del Carmen
    I can’t believe I missed this gem! Great ride report.

    :lurk
    ScotsFire likes this.