Electric Motorcycle & Scooter News/Updates

Discussion in 'Electric Motorcycles' started by voltsxamps, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. smdub

    smdub Adventurer

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    They still could have triangulated the head tube.
    The e-bike world seems to have more than its fair share of lousy designs. Its clear that many of them don't have a clue about mechanical design. I'm guessing it just attracts the hipster / art / eco types. It leaves me little faith in the rest of the design/quality.
  2. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    It uses the same QC motor/swingarm/wheel kit as the CSC City Slicker, just with a bigger motor/controller to get more power.
    The City Slicker has a better fork (100km/h on that single crown setup above...not funny) and the price is only $ US 2500 istead of $ US 6700 for the Fonzi.
    Interesting observation: the Slicker has a top speed of ~74 km/h (46 mph) and the Base Model Fonzi ~80 km/h. Not much difference, which makes me think the Base Model uses the same or similar controller specs as the Slicker.
    Only the Performance Model Fonzi does 100 km/h but cost an additional $ US 1300.
    Jay_In_Milpitas likes this.
  3. flinders_72

    flinders_72 Long timer

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    Fonzarelli looks like it's trying to take advantage of the lack of e-bikes here (Aus). I wouldn't pay half that much and I doubt anyone familiar with motorcycles or real scooters would.
  4. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    Yeah, no CSC City Slicker's for sale over there or here in NZ.
    I've seen that ZERO pulled out of Australia too.
  5. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    Thinking out loud - have seen several kits to "electrify" bicycles, but only 1 to date (the electric Cub) to "electrify" smaller, older vehicles that originally came with an ICE. I'm thinking of all the 50cc mopeds and all the "no peds" from the early '80s. Even the Honda CT-90/110s and other horizontal engine variants. I'd think that a frame/brake/suspension/electrical/chain drive system already made for the road and strong enough to withstand the torque of a small ICE (but still much lighter than most other ICE vehicles) would be a very likely candidate for an electrification kit.
  6. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    UBCO reveals new 50 mph (80 km/h) electric trail bike with pedals

    Micah Toll - Sep. 6th 2019 12:13 am ET

    Just when you thought it couldn’t get any wilder in the electric bicycle space, this happens. UBCO has just revealed their upcoming UBCO FRX1 Freeride Trail Bike featuring motorcycle level specs, speeds of up to 50 mph (80 km/h), and functional bicycle pedals.

    New Zealand-based UBCO is likely better known for its UBCO 2×2 electric utility two-wheeler. It’s not quite a bicycle but not quite a motorcycle either. It’s kind of its own category — something of an electric farm bike. Either way, it’s nothing like the company’s latest announcement, which represents a hard left turn for UBCO. The company has just revealed its first true electric bicycle, if you can call it that. The UBCO FRX1 Freeride Trail Bike is set to be debuted at the AIMExpo on Sept 26 in Columbus, Ohio.

    UBCO FRX1 Freeride Trail Bike revealed
    The UBCO FRX1 is an electric two-wheeler with functional pedals and a pedal assist system. Technically speaking, that makes it an electric bicycle. But only technically.

    [​IMG]

    Truly, this is an electric trail bike with all the capabilities of a lightweight dirt bike. Tipping the scales at just 115 lb (52 kg), the UBCO FRX1 features a 15 kW (20 hp) peak, liquid-cooled, mid-drive electric motor. The motor can be controlled either by the twist throttle or via pedal assist. Yes, pedal assist — like a cute little European e-bike. Except that this e-bike can hit speeds of up to 50 mph (80 km/h).

    UBCO claims that it comes with a 9-speed gear box for pedaling, which should make it more pedal-able than one might initially imagine.

    [​IMG]

    The UBCO FRX1 features a 2.2 kWh Li-ion battery pack that the company rates with a maximum range of 62 miles (100 km). At 35 Wh/mi (22 Wh/km), though, that’s likely at a reduced speed of closer to 20 mph (32 km/h). The UBCO FRX1 features the ability to regain up to 10% of its expended energy via regenerative braking. And charging up the pack the old-fashioned way (i.e. from the wall) takes just 2.5 hours.

    The aluminum-frame design offers 8 inches (203 mm) of travel in the front and 7.9 inches (200 mm) of travel in the rear, both with adjustable compression and rebound. Stopping power is provided by four-piston hydraulic disc brakes in the front and dual-piston hydraulic disc brakes in the rear. There’s also user-adjustable regenerative braking.

    We haven’t heard any word yet on pricing, but don’t expect it to be priced competitively with a $500 250 W electric bike — this is an entirely different beast.

    UBCO says that while the FRX1 is the first new EV to follow the company’s UBCO 2×2 electric farm bike, it won’t be the last. The company is planning more product announcements over the next year.

    [​IMG]

    https://electrek.co/2019/09/06/ubco-frx1-electric-trail-bike-50-mph/


    I really like this - kudos to the UBCO design & engineering team.
  7. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    See what I mean about the best EMs morphing up from e-bicycles rather than converting ICE motorcycles? This 'bicycle' looks pretty darn motorcyclish. It weighs 115 lbs. Now imagine it with a motor about 50% bigger, a battery pack with twice the volume (meaning L,W&H only have to grow 26% each), double the system voltage, give it 50-60 hp and swap the pedals for pegs. And it would weigh around 200 lbs.!

    Would that not be the ultimate blade for canyon carving?
    voltsxamps and RedRocket like this.
  8. jimmy650

    jimmy650 South Canol Racing Club

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    Wow!
    The low end Zero FX 3.6 kWh is 27 hp, 247 lb for about $8500 - incentive $.
    Kinda heavy, but street and freeway legal. The full size moto components, forks, wheels, etc. weigh a lot more than bike equivalents. Removing the charger and all the lights and mirrors could drop it down closer to 220lb or so.
  9. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    Bt10 likes this.
  10. smdub

    smdub Adventurer

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    Adding that much power requires much beefier components. No way I'd ride an e-bike w/ as much power as my KTM 500EXC with the brakes/wheels/tires of my full suspension mtn bikes.
    I'd like to see the KTM Freeride E-XC in person. 238#, 25hp, $8500 is similar to the Zero FX. Not to knock Zero in the slightest but I think a KTM designed dirt bike is probably a better dirt bike than Zero's.
    flinders_72 likes this.
  11. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    Exactly! Start moving/stopping a frame/suspension/propulsion unit/passenger at typical roadway speeds and the stresses increase exponentially - as does power required. Not a full-on road bike (but similar) is the current Honda Grom. Barely goes fast enough on secondary roads to keep from being run over (but easily 50 mph), gets 134 MPG (with a 1.45 gal tank means around 190 mile range), weighs 229 lbs and costs $3600 (2020 USA MSRP). Morphing an E-cycle up from a bicycle is doable, but the time and cost of doing so is taking too much of each.
  12. ridenm

    ridenm Missing my emotional support squirrel Supporter

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    I posted this in the tread lightly forum:

    By order of the Interior Secretary, Class 1, 2, and 3 e-bikes can now be used wherever non-motorized bicycles are legal.
    The order applies to all DoI lands: BLM, BOR, FWS, and NPS.
    voltsxamps likes this.
  13. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    Your frame and components need to be beefy to handle speed and weight, but with less weight you need less beefiness (meaning weight) to support it. Less weight requires less weight in batteries to accelerate it. See how less weight feeds on itself? Power is a factor but less so, because the frame members are generally oriented such that power is easy to manage without so much beefiness. (For example, thrust loads are carried by the main swingarm tubes in compression.)

    The only additional beefiness you need to handle higher speed is for cornering and braking. Those can be managed by simply adding weight, but also (preferably) by structural layout, as in broadening the stance of existing frame members. (Example: The FRX1 shown above could get a lot more stiffness against braking loads by lengthening the steering head and making the X-beams above the battery pack vertically taller. Only a slight increase in length of the same wall thickness tubes, but much stiffer under braking. Torsion too.)

    Also keep in mind that today's production motorcycles have grown far fatter than they need to be because heavier is simpler and cheaper. Bicycles are designed - and accepted - with a far more elemental approach. I come at this from a pavement orientation, and I know there are small-bore GP bikes that a fairly strong man can easily pick up and walk away with. And those bikes are about as elemental as the FRX1. A dirt bike that has to land from a big jump of course needs more strength, but again, less for less weight.
  14. smdub

    smdub Adventurer

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    Power is very much a factor. I can't go fast enough on a little 110 to really F-up weak rims/tires or worry about noodly forks. Whole 'nother world when you put more power behind it and can go (and run into stuff) much faster. And the faster you go the higher you need to safety margin to be as the stakes are going way up.

    Street motorcycles maybe. I think you'd be hard pressed to take that much weight out of a modern top-tier competitive motox or Enduro bike. Definitely not 50#.
  15. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Watch this Sur Ron electric motorcycle win 1st place racing against gas motorcycles

    Micah Toll - Sep. 8th 2019 2:37 pm ET

    The Sur Ron electric motorcycle is one of the most exciting off-road electric motorcycles to hit the scene recently. The high performance yet low-cost electric motorcycle showed off its abilities by smoking a bunch of gas motorcycles to win 1st place in a recent race. Check out the epic video below!

    The Sur Ron electric motorcycle was introduced last year and became an instant hit. Its low price of around $3,500 combined with around 6 kW of power and 45-ish mph (72 km/h) top speed make it a popular little electric motorcycle.

    We rarely get to see it compete against gas motorcycles in formal races though, so this was a rare treat. In the race video below, Tucker Neary entered the Sur Ron in his local Hare Scramble race in Naturita, Colorado.


    As Tucker explained to Electrek:

    “The race was a Hare Scramble format and I entered into the Sportsman Class with a 2019 Sur-Ron X. The Sportsman Class is an Unclassified Class and allows racers to race any motorcycle size and displacement, which was a good fit for my untraditional entry. I had only ridden the bike once before the race so although I knew I could be competitive on it, I was not sure where it would stack up against traditional gas race bikes.”

    [​IMG]

    The Sur Ron had an immediate handicap when the race started due to the “dead engine” start requirement, which meant the Sur Ron had start with the key in the off position. The Sur Ron has around a 4 to 5-second electronic start-up delay, giving it a bit of a slower start from the completely off position. However, Tucker quickly took the lead in his motorcycle class and held onto it throughout the race.


    As Tucker explained to us:

    “Traditional motocross bikes have more suspension and power. These two things were my biggest disadvantage aboard the Sur-Ron X. The race course was rough and choppy and the bike did not soak up the rough track like a traditional gas bike, it required me to pick my lines carefully and try to be strategic when coming into difficult sections. I could keep my speed on the fast flowing sections of the track but the power limitations were noticeable when I had a steep hill to climb or needed to pass another racer quickly. The advantages of the Sur-Ron are that it is light and nimble. If I picked the right line and carried momentum, the bike would dissect the course nicely.”

    Tucker as had another advantage aboard the Sur Ron: Its stealthy silence.

    “On a traditional gas bike, you can always hear your competitors as they get close to you and you can race them accordingly. No one knew I was there! I started having to use the horn because I knew I was catching racers off guard when trying to pass them. They had no idea I had closed up on them.”

    See Tucker’s ride first hand in the video from his Electric Cycle Rider YouTube channel. Then continue reading below for Tucker’s race impressions.



    Sur Ron race video

    The grueling 3 lap race covered extremely rough terrain and took Tucker 58 minutes to complete.

    The Sur Ron’s battery is just shy of 2 kW. That’s a lot for an e-bike but rather modest for an electric motorcycle, especially one ridden through sand and dirt.

    As the race neared the end, Tucker’s Sur Ron had nearly depleted its battery. The bike’s top speed and power dropped as it began to enter “limp mode”.

    Then with just four turns left on the last lap, the battery died and Tucker had to do the walk of shame across the line. Though with the lead he built up through out the race, there wasn’t too much shame in it since he still held onto first place in his motorcycle class. Not too shabby!


    As Tucker explained in a recap of the race:

    “I placed 1st in my class and I’m pretty stoked about that! I think the bike did really well. I almost finished with the battery, but on that third lap I went into EP [economy] mode and about three or four corners from the finish it finally gave out but that’s about the best place possible to have the bike die on me. Each lap was just slightly over 5 miles so I basically got 15 miles of hard riding and my total time elapsed was 58 minutes.”

    While the Sur Ron is often quoted as having a range of around 40-50 miles (65-80 km), that is only possible when riding in Eco mode and at reduced speeds on flat, smooth terrain. Sand, dirt and hills are all known to eat up battery in electric motorcycles, making these styles of races particularly brutal for electric motorcycles. Of course that also makes the 1st place finish all the more impressive.

    https://electrek.co/2019/09/08/sur-ron-electric-motorcycle-race-beat-gas-motorcycles/

    Impressive indeed! :clap
    Baja Ho likes this.
  16. Baja Ho

    Baja Ho Momentum is your friend

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    Nice job, didn't have to clean an air filter either.
    voltsxamps likes this.
  17. derblauereiter

    derblauereiter Mostly made of cheese Supporter

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    Attached Files:

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  18. T.S.Zarathustra

    T.S.Zarathustra Been here awhile

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  19. wheresbaoskee

    wheresbaoskee Perpendicular to Everything

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    Long Way Round had a handful of support vehicles in addition to the 3 bikes. Haven't watched Long Way Down (yet) but I would imagine the same.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Way_Round

    Watch the tail end of the Top Gear Patagonia special when they are GTFOing of Ushuaia; there are at least 3 or 4 of the giant racing trucks that run the Dakar and a fleet of SUVs. IIRC they mention needing to evacuate somewhere around 35+ crew and tons of gear. Much more elaborate of a production than the "... Way 'Round." series, but there's always a support crew someplace.

    Honestly, I'm more interested in how the Rivian trucks perform than the bikes at this point. :lol3

    Should still be quite interesting to see it put together. :clap
  20. derblauereiter

    derblauereiter Mostly made of cheese Supporter

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    Truth!