Electric Motorcycle & Scooter News/Updates

Discussion in 'Electric Motorcycles' started by voltsxamps, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    Look up "Elec-Trak E15." Built by GE in Rochester(?), NY in the early 70s. It was part of a broad line from E8 to E20, where the number refers to the horsepower of a roughly-equivalently-perfoming ICE tractor. The E15 is the largest frame. They had a lot of available attachments including mower decks (front- and mid-mount), snow blade, snow blower, tiller, front-end loader, weight boxes, extra battery boxes. There were also a lot of hand tools that would plug into a special power outlet, including a hand drill, chain saw, welder, AC inverter, weed whacker and probably a few I've forgotten.

    GE sold the line to Workhorse, who sold it to Avco under the New Idea label. Mine is an Avco EGT-150, essentially identical to the E15. I sent you looking for the GE E15 because there's more info on it, but there were very few changes throughout.

    Mine has a mid-mount deck and a snow blade, and I modified a Black & Decker weed whacker to plug directly into the power outlet. These were made with all the sophisticated technology you would expect in the Apollo era. (Not a single solid state component, all contactors, relays, micro-switches, big cables and batteries.) Failures happen, but anyone with basic hand tools and a volt meter can fix it. You can still get parts. So 40 years later, it tenaciously refuses to die.

    Fun fact: Apparently at some tractor pulls they run a class for garden tractors. You'd think that would be just for a laugh after everyone in the crowd has already killed a six-pack, but I'm told that some of these guys get Very Serious about their highly-modified garden tractors. But few have heard about the Elec-Track (even less about the later Workhorse and Avco versions). I've heard that a few ET owners have walked off with first place driving bone-stock ETs. Not surprising when you consider they have a total weight of 800-900 lbs, 400ish of which is in lead-acid batteries, most of which are directly over the rear wheels, and they of course have low end torque no ICE tractor can even dream of.

    Some people keep theirs pristine and collect all the attachments and tools. Mine's a tool for getting things done, with all the scrapes, dents, repairs, patches and built-up crud you'd expect on a 40-year old tool. Chances are very good it will still be running long after I'm dead.

    To bring all this back on-topic, electric power makes it much easier to build vehicles that last virtually forever. There is simply no reason for your transportation to need replacing as often as it does, except to keep putting your money in someone else's pocket. We keep doing that because companies don't want to give us that option, for the sole reason that it limits their profits. That's a big spit in the face to anyone who believes capitalism gives us better choices.

    Big truck tractors have lives in the millions of miles, because buyers demand it, because cost per mile is everything to them. Consumers are more easily fooled, so they are. EVs can help turn that around.

    I'm going to attempt to make my EV the last one of its kind in use. Because the only reason it shouldn't last forever is that people falsely believe that's the way things must be.
    timblanch and MJSfoto1956 like this.
  2. smdub

    smdub Adventurer

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  3. Traxx

    Traxx Long timer Supporter

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    A842AC87-C4A5-45E7-8689-1E4B158A3C61.jpeg

    Well, I was hoping. As you can see my needs are a little different than most. I have since gone to a slightly larger truck since I was stressing this one to much.
    I could use a electric lawn tractor, as long as it can mow 5 acres min on 1 charge.
    I was digging what you had to say up until the last paragraph. But I will leave it at that.
  4. Bolzen

    Bolzen Been here awhile

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    That's because ICE is now at 99% of its potential, whereas EV at 1. And yet they already manage to sell some of that percent :-)
    MJSfoto1956 likes this.
  5. Cataract2

    Cataract2 Where to?

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    Have my eye on that.
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  6. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    I've seen conversions of ICE tractors on a scale like your truck-stresser, but used for smaller specialty farms. An ET can mow a 2 acre lawn. It's small, and only carries about 4kWh in lead-acid batteries. You'd need to pull a battery trailer to mow 5. Or, you could convert to lithium and carry 4 or 5 times more energy on the tractor. Traction would be less because it'd be lighter, but traction isn't needed too much for mowing. And you can add weight boxes for tilling, snow removal and such.
    Traxx likes this.
  7. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    How about a guy with no prior cycle ownership experience buys a clapped-out Honda S90, some e-bike components and modifies the Honda in his studio apartment with a Dremel as his only power tool? For less than $1000. And wins a bike build off.
    https://www.bikeexif.com/electric-moped-honda-s90
  8. Jay_In_Milpitas

    Jay_In_Milpitas Zero to sixty in February

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    I like what he did, and how he did it.
    But am I the only one pondering " Now I ride the bike to the gym and back every single day."?
  9. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    ^ Someone else commented that it seemed an oxymoron to ride a bike to the gym instead of pedaling. I also thought that the current state of e-bikes would get you a much more competent type 2 e-bike for the same $ as his conversion, and the wear replacement parts would be much more easily sourced. But I still applaud the effort and can see a manufacturer working on conversion kits for the (true) moped world - lots of them still around.
  10. T.S.Zarathustra

    T.S.Zarathustra Been here awhile

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    Many are mentioning Solid State Lithium Batteries as the next big thing. Now there are news of Aluminium (Aluminum in the colonies) Batteries being possibly even better. New cathode material has opened up big possibilities for Aluminium Batteries. Aluminium is the most abundant metal element in the Earth's crust, with large mining and manufacturing capabilities, plus recycling plants, already in place.
    Traxx likes this.
  11. njpaddler

    njpaddler Been here awhile

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  12. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Nobel Prize in Chemistry win for lithium-ion batteries is a win for green energy

    Michelle Lewis - Oct. 9th 2019 9:54

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    John B Goodenough of the University of Texas at Austin, M. Stanley Whittingham of SUNY Binghamton University, and Akira Yoshino of Meijo University have won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm today for the development of lithium-ion batteries.


    The Nobel Prize’s website explains the reason for the honor awarded to the three scientists, with the headline, “They created a rechargeable world”:

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019 rewards the development of the lithium-ion battery. This lightweight, rechargeable and powerful battery is now used in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric vehicles. It can also store significant amounts of energy from solar and wind power, making possible a fossil fuel-free society.

    Lithium-ion batteries are used globally to power the portable electronics that we use to communicate, work, study, listen to music, and search for knowledge. Lithium-ion batteries have also enabled the development of long-range electric cars and the storage of energy from renewable sources, such as solar and wind power.

    Whittingham started work in the 1970s on developing methods that could lead to fossil-fuel-free energy technologies. Explains the Guardian, “His device, the first functional lithium battery, used lithium metal in the anode and lithium ions tucked into titanium disulphide for the cathode.” But when it was repeatedly recharged, it ran the risk of exploding. “To improve safety, Whittingham combined metallic lithium with aluminum in the anode.”

    Goodenough replaced the titanium disulphide in the cathode with cobalt oxide, which doubled its voltage.

    In 1985, Yoshino used Goodenough’s cathode to create the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery, with the anode in his battery composed of lithium ions and electrons housed within a carbon material called petroleum coke. This made the battery much safer. An image of Yoshino’s battery is below:

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    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry explanation continues:

    The result was a lightweight, hardwearing battery that could be charged hundreds of times before its performance deteriorated. The advantage of lithium-ion batteries is that they are not based upon chemical reactions that break down the electrodes, but upon lithium ions flowing back and forth between the anode and cathode.

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized our lives since they first entered the market in 1991. They have laid the foundation of a wireless, fossil fuel-free society, and are of the greatest benefit to humankind.


    Professor Sara Snogerup-Linse, a member of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry, said:

    The [electric car] batteries no longer weigh two tonnes [metric tons], but 300 kg. The ability to store energy from renewable sources, the sun, the wind, opens up for sustainable energy consumption.

    You can watch the entire Nobel Prize in Chemistry announcement here:



    :super Recognition well deserved.
    Cat0020 likes this.
  13. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    New Dutch electric moped gets dual batteries and up to 100 miles of range

    Micah Toll - Oct. 9th 2019 2:28 pm ET


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    Brekr, a Dutch startup, has just unveiled its first electric vehicle: The Brekr Model B.

    The electric moped — or scooter — or noped (seriously, what is this thing?!) packs some serious battery capacity into its small frame.

    Brekr Model B e-moped unveiled
    The bike’s designers created a 1.9 kWh battery pack for the Brekr Model B, and then left room for up to two of the big battery packs.

    That means the little electric moped can get between 50-80 km (31-50 miles) of range on a single battery, or twice as much when wielding dual batteries.

    Those batteries are built from 18650 battery cells and weigh in at 10 kg (22 pounds) each. They can be charged in five hours and come with a two-year warranty.

    The batteries are slung low in the battery box mounted largely, though not entirely, underneath the main aluminum frame members. The seat lifts up to allow for the batteries to be removed for charging indoors.

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    While you would be excused for missing it at first glance, the frame actually appears to have a veryshort rear swingarm. Its suspension consists of dual coilover shocks running parallel to the main frame member.

    Combined with the inverted front suspension fork, that gives the Brekr Model B full suspension credentials.

    The electric moped will also come with GPS functionality and smart phone connectivity, allowing for features such as anti-theft GPS tracking as well as vehicle diagnostics and remote data.

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    The whole bike weighs only 62 kg (137 pounds) with a single battery, making it one of the lighter electric mopeds out there.

    Brekr hasn’t shared any info regarding the power rating of that rear hub motor, but don’t expect it to be too high. The Brekr Model B is being offered in two different low speed variants: 25 km/h (15.5 mph) and 45 km/h (25 mph). It doesn’t take too much power to reach those speeds.

    And while many Americans may scoff at such low speeds, Europeans will be all too familiar with the low speed requirement for the L1e scooter category that allows riders to operate vehicles like these with only a standard driver’s license.

    The Brekr Model B is designed and assembled in the Netherlands, but it isn’t entirely produced there. While some major parts like the battery are built locally, other parts such as the frame are manufactured in Taiwan.

    For those that are ready to pre-order their own, you can do so for just €9 (US $10). That will get you a voucher to start configuring your Brekr Model B this December. But you’ll still be on the hook for the full price of €3,890 and won’t be seeing your new electric moped until spring 2020 at the earliest. The Brekr Model B will be limited to sales in the Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany at first, but will expand to other countries, according to EMN.
    MJSfoto1956 likes this.
  14. alekkas

    alekkas Long timer

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    I love this story. The build is cool - of course. The method is heartening. And then I see his pic, it's just another very young adult (kid) with a different outlook, tenacity, and some artistry. I hope he - or others like him - find a way. Surely, the future solutions to past problems are going to come from "kids" like him....
  15. maddjack

    maddjack UFO Pilot Supporter

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    Ruters reported that HD dealers are balking at even having an electric bike in the showroom , complaining that since the primary riding season is over and its slow ,its nothing but money sitting there. Also I have to think what rich hipster ( the target of the bike ) would want to stroll thru rows of dinosaur conventional machines to see the " hip " new e machine.
  16. alekkas

    alekkas Long timer

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    Park em in the front window then.
  17. Cataract2

    Cataract2 Where to?

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    The dealerships will be the death of them.
  18. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Yamaha announces new electric motorcycles, scooters and more in huge EV push
    Micah Toll

    - Oct. 10th 2019 9:20 am ET


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    Yamaha is headed to the Tokyo Motor Show 2019 later this month and is set to show off a wide range of new electric vehicles. From electric motorcycles and scooters to e-bikes and even a few oddities, Yamaha is going to have quite the EV spread on display. And instead of making everyone wait on the edge of their seats for a few more weeks, Yamaha has unveiled some of its new goods early.



    Yamaha E01 electric scooter
    The Yamaha E01 is a 125cc class electric scooter with fast charging capabilities.

    As a somewhat larger scooter than most entry-level electric scooters, the E01 is designed to prioritize comfort and utility while traveling at faster speeds and over longer distances.

    According to a statement:

    “Combining Yamaha’s scooter and EV technologies, [the E01] brings practicality for everyday use as well as a quality ride exceeding that of conventional scooters. In addition to excellent comfort, it features a design that expressively highlights a new generation of sporty styling.”

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    Yamaha E02 electric city scooter
    The Yamaha E02 is a 50cc class scooter, meaning it will likely hit slower speeds of around 45-50 km/h (28-31 mph). That would put it in a similar class as Gogoro’s new Viva electric scooter, another e-scooter designed specifically for commuting around city centers and other densely populated areas where high speed is less important compared to agility and convenience. In fact, Yamaha is actually working with Gogoro to build electric scooters based around Gogoro’s swappable batteries.

    The E02 will feature a lightweight design and a removable battery – two key features that are critical for urban commuter e-scooters.

    [​IMG]



    Yamaha YPJ-YZ electric mountain bike
    This full-suspension electric mountain bike features a split downtube to hide the battery inside the frame. Its long-travel suspension suggests the bike is designed for more intense trails including jumps, while its steeper rake angle implies that it might even earn some downhill credibility as well.

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    According to Yamaha:

    “This e-bike was designed with the looks of a race machine riding out on the track. Its mass-centralized chassis is suggestive of the engineering approach with our YZ Series of competition motocross models (locating chassis weight near the center for increased handling performance). The YPJ-YZ provides stable cornering performance and light handling even on rough terrain and the simple, lightweight frame was designed to show its relationship with YZ Series models.”

    I’ve previously tested a Yamaha electric gravel bike on off-road trails and found the motor to be super smooth yet torquey and powerful. So if the YPJ-YZ is anything like the Yamaha Wabash that I tried, and I’m guessing it’s going to be even better, then this will definitely be another e-bike to keep on your off-road wish list.



    Yamaha TY-E electric trials bike
    Trials riding is the sport of using a bicycle or motorcycle to get over, around or through large obstacles such as boulders, logs, and tables, all without touching one’s feet to the ground. The TY-E is Yamaha’s take on an electric trials bike, a sport that EVs are particularly well suited for. Without needing to clutch and shift, riders can focus more on their balance and maneuvers. And with two handlebar-mounted brakes (as opposed to a rear foot brake found on gas bikes), riders have better braking control as well.

    Unlike some of the other models here that are brand new, the TY-E has actually gotten a bit of real-world testing in already. Professional rider Kenichi Kuroyama finished 2nd place in the FIM Trial-E cup in both 2018 and 2019 while riding a TY-E.

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  19. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Zero FX electric motorcycle gets redesign from old school clay model technique
    Micah Toll

    - Oct. 13th 2019 6:48 am


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    While many people might think that all automotive body development takes place in CAD or computer aided design these days, a big chunk of it still gets the old school clay modeling treatment to sculpt out designs that computers just can’t emote as well as the human hand. And that’s exactly how Nick Graveley of Claymoto developed new bodywork for the Zero FX electric motorcycle, turning it into a classic 80’s-style flat track racing motorcycle known as the Quiet Riot.




    Nick has been working in clay modeling for 15 years and founded Claymoto to work exclusively with motorcycle designs.

    He first got involved with Zero Motorcycles during the design of the original Zero SR/F electric streetfighter bodywork way back in 2017. That’s when he got the idea to update Zero’s classic FX supermoto with some new styling – based on some old styling. And thus, the seed for the Quiet Riot electric flat track racer was born.

    Flat track racing, while still in existence now, was in its heyday in the 1970’s and 80’s, and Nick thought that the Zero FX would make a great platform for such a bike. Its high torque, regenerative braking and lightweight design should make it perfect for the sport. It just needed to look the part.

    So Nick set to work to give the Zero FX the full clay model treatment and turn it into the Quiet Riot.

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    It took about 80 hours of work, during which Nick used a mirror to create a centerline, which allowed him to model just half of the bike’s new body work. As he described it in his own words in a statement to Electrek:

    “I took inspiration from the flat trackers of the 70s and early 80s, when flattrack was last a big thing. The large side and front numberboards being a staple feature of these bikes. Keeping the bike as smooth as possible around the knee area was also important so as not to catch the rider’s leathers when riding. I’ve always been an advocate of shrink wrapping the bodywork around the engineering package as much as possible, and this has been achieved here as much as possible.”

    Once he had the design hand finished to the right shape, he then scanned the Quiet Riot bodywork into a computer and finished in with industry software to create a mold for the carbon fiber body panels.

    [​IMG]

    In addition to the body work, the Zero FX required a few other changes to get it ready for true flat track racing. The belt drive system was swapped out for a chain kit and a custom setup was created for the rear lights, license plate holder and rear mud guard. The three can be removed quickly and as one unit ahead of a race.

    Other changes included new front head lights, shortening the suspension, moving the rear brake to the left handlebar (a unique feature that only electric motorcycles can offer), adding an aluminum bashplate and relocating the speedometer to retain the classic numberboard look up front.



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    According to Nick, the bike gives around 60 km (37 mi) of racing when thrashing it full-tilt, or around 130 km (80 mi) of riding when going a bit easier on it.

    Now Nick has a kit all setup that will allow riders to bolt-on the setup to their own Zero FX and achieve a very rare electric flat track racing motorcycle. Just get in touch with Claymoto to learn more about turning your FX into a Quiet Riot.

    As much as I love the Zero FX platform, I spend most of my time on the road and thus I think I’ll stick with the Zero FXS, which I reviewed earlier this year. But if I ever head to the dirt and want to try my hand at flat track racing, now I can at least do it in style.



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  20. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Horwin debuts two new electric motorcycles, one with a 5-speed gearbox

    Micah Toll - Oct. 14th 2019 8:31 am ET


    Horwin has a couple of new electric motorcycles that it will be debuting at the 2019 EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show, though it’s already showing off the goods now. The upcoming CR6 and CR6 PRO are intended to serve as middleweight electric motorcycles designed for commuters.

    While the Austrian-based electric motorcycle distributor has mostly sold imported models until now, the new bikes are being pitched as European-centric models designed for the local market.

    Horwin’s new CR6 and CR6 Pro are a pair of electric motorcycles that offer something of a modern take on the classic cafe racer styling.

    Horwin CR6 and CR6 Pro electric motorcycles
    The bikes are actually quite similar, except that the CR6 Pro includes a 5-speed manual gearbox that seems to match that nostalgic cafe racer feel.

    Despite both bikes fitting into the 125 cc class of motorbikes, the CR6 will have a slower top speed of just 95 km/h (59 mph). The CR6 Pro will be a bit sportier with a top speed of up to 105 km/h (65 mph).

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    While those speeds might make short highway jaunts achievable, the moderate speed levels mean that the Horwin CR6 and CR6 Pro will be best suited for combined urban/suburban commuting.

    The CR6’s acceleration of 0-60 km/h (37 mph) in 6 seconds (or 5 seconds for the CR6 Pro) should be plenty for urban riding, even if it won’t be the most thrilling performance anyone has ever seen on an electric motorcycle. But perhaps flying through the gears will make up for the mid-tier acceleration and help add back a bit of excitement.

    A peak power of 7.2 kW (CR6) and 11 kW (CR6 Pro) from the chain-driving mid-mounted electric motor should still be sufficient for the small bikes, and the lower top speed helps eke out more range from the non-removable 4 kWh Panasonic battery pack.

    [​IMG]

    While Horwin hasn’t stated a range for the bikes when traveling at higher speeds, the CR6 is rated for 150 km (93 mi) of range at city speeds of around 45 km/h (28 mph). The CR6 Pro gets a tad lower range estimate of 135 km (84 mi) at that speed.

    Other features include a combined hydraulic braking system with a 240 mm front rotor and 180 mm rear rotor. LED lighting comes standard and the instrument cluster seems to be a hybrid analog/digital design.

    While Horwin’s site says the bikes are already available for purchase at prices of €5,890 and €6,990 for the CR6 and CR6 Pro (including EU VAT), the bike’s won’t officially debut until the EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show in about 3 weeks.


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