Electric Motorcycle & Scooter News/Updates

Discussion in 'Electric Motorcycles' started by voltsxamps, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Depends a lot on the bike’s potentiometer curve (throttle). I aced my rider’s M1 test going a snails pace on the “lollipop”. I also won my last slow bike contest where you have to be last to cross the finish line w/o putting a foot down. I had the only electric in the race. :)

    Absolutely agree on going higher speeds, however, unfortunately for the very few EM’s that have gears, it’s hasn’t translated to much more speed.. yet. There are awesome exceptions though, like the 2 speed Zombie 222 (19.30)

    Ditch likes this.
  2. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Long timer Supporter

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    I was talking about more about the motor spending most of its life at very low RPM, all the way down to stall speed, like what a trials bike goes through. That could lead to a shortened motor life.
  3. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    Even if you stick a countershaft sprocket on the motor armature and the only reduction in the system is the chain drive, that ratio is typically 5:1 or better (or can be, if that's how you're designing the bike). So if it's moving at all, even at trials speeds, it's enough to keep the motor happy. There are also things you can do in the controller to prevent hurting anything.

    That doesn't mean an e-trials bike will work just like a gasser. On a gasser sometimes the rider will de-clutch, rev the motor and use its rotational momentum along with popping the clutch to do a quick hop. That will feel different at different speeds between a multi-speed gasser and a single speed EM. The EM designer also needs to decide on relying on big torque or big flywheel. Whether EM or gasser, big flywheel or no flywheel, is inherently better may not ever be answered, because some riders adapt to change better than others. There's a lot of deeply ingrained muscle memory in trials riders, just like for road racers, flat trackers, MXers, etc. Make the bike behave differently, even if it's clearly a win on paper, and some will deal with it, some won't. So what's 'best' is something that will evolve as the market accepts EMs.
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  4. T.S.Zarathustra

    T.S.Zarathustra Been here awhile

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    It's not principally for higher speed, although it can help reach higher speeds. It's for better efficiency, having the motor turn at better efficiency RPM, both at acceleration and cruise speed. Better efficiency translates into longer range for same size battery. Gains because of efficiency are partially offset by more complicated, expensive, and heavier gearbox. On the other hand, the weight of the extra gear can be partially offset by use of smaller electric motor in the unit. You don't need as big motor to accelerate if you can multiply the torque with gears. At cruising you're only using small part of the total motor power.
    When Tesla (and their partners) were trying to "design" their original gearbox, they didn't have the knowledge that is available now. Just because it didn't work for them then, doesn't mean it cannot work now.
    Have a look at the picture below. You can see that if properly done, the extra gear in the gearbox does not need add a lot to the total weight. I took this picture in a recent trade show visit. This is one of motors from a Chinese company, that powers large portion of electric cars made in China. Wikipedia claims that China has about half of electric cars sold in the world in 2018 so they should know a bit about what they're doing.

    20190913_102132c.jpg
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  5. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    One thing that would greatly assist us armchair theorists is motor curves for operation under a variety of conditions. Most motors have an efficiency curve that is very broad, remaining high over a very wide RPM. But for example, (IIRC) I've heard that the efficiency of PM motors (a very common type) drops a lot when they're lightly loaded. That's not a typical test condition, but it sure is something every motor sees frequently on the road. Other motor types behave differently.

    Without that kind of data, we can't even debate this stuff. We can only speculate.
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  6. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Kumpan’s 100 km/h (62 MPH) electric scooters offer up classic styling
    Micah Toll

    - Oct. 16th 2019 3:50 am


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    When you think of a European scooter, you probably imagine that classic step-through styling with a big front shield and a comfy seat for two. And while you might be hearing that distant “putt putt” of a tiny one-cylinder engine in your mind, Kumpan wants to make sure that the next wave of classic European scooters are completely silent — and completely electric.




    Kumpan electric scooters
    Kumpan is an electric scooter designer and manufacturer based in Germany.

    You might not know it just by looking at their nostalgic step-through scooters, but the company actually got its start with electric kickscooters.

    Fast forward a few years, and Kumpan is now showing off its 100 km/h (62 mph) rated Kumpan 1954 Ri S electric scooter.

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    This is the upgraded sports version of the company’s Kumpan 1954 Ri, which is a slower model designed to fit within the L1e framework, thanks to its 45 km/h (28 mph) top speed. While that speed might not be as thrilling, it’s often enough for city riders, and it has the added benefit of allowing operation with only a simple driver’s license.

    But for anyone that feels the need for speed, it’s the 1954 Ri S that will get the juices flowing. And they’ll be flowing at 100 km/h!

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    The scooter is powered by a 7 kW (9.4 hp) rear hub motor, though I took one for a test ride the last time I was in Germany, and I distinctly recall hitting peaks as high as 9 kW (12 hp) in my test ride.

    While some electric scooters have moved away from hub motors in favor of belt or chain driving mid-drive motors, locating the motor in the rear wheel frees up more room for batteries under the seat.

    In this case, the 1954 Ri S comes standard with two removable 1.5 kWh battery packs for up to 80 km (50 mi) of range. But the Kumpan 1954 Ri S actually has a third battery slot, allowing riders to add an additional battery pack. That third battery pack will bump the range up to 120 km (75 mi). Slow down a bit and you can go even further, with Kumpan rating the scooter for a max range of 186 km (115 mi) at city speeds of 45 km/h (28 mph).

    The battery packs use LG battery cells and come with a digital readout near the handle. That way riders always know exactly how much charge is in the batteries, even when they are off the scooter.

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    On the handlebars you’ll find a 7-inch touch display that offers access to all of the vehicle’s settings.

    There’s no key necessary to start the scooter, either, as everything is handled digitally. Even opening the battery hatch or rear cargo box is controlled via the touch screen.

    [​IMG]

    In keeping with the classy styling of retro-Euro scooters, Kumpan’s own scooters are available in a wide range of color combinations including paint, upholstery, and accents. That allows riders to make their scooters highly customized.

    Production occurs locally in Germany at the company’s manufacturing facility.

    The 1954 RiS isn’t what I’d call ultra-affordable though, starting at €6,999 including VAT, or around US $7,700.

    That puts it in a similar price range to the Vespa Elettrica, another famous European electric scooter. With the Vespa Elettrica limited to a top speed of just 50 km/h (31 mph), the Kumpan 1954 RiS offers twice the speed and certainly opens the door for more commuting options.
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  7. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Revolt’s 53 MPH (85 km/h) budget electric motorcycle begins making deliveries

    Micah Toll - Oct. 19th 2019 4:37 am ET


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    The Revolt RV400 electric motorcycle was unveiled earlier this summer and was subsequently slammed with huge demand. Now the popular Indian-made electric motorcycle is making its first deliveries.

    A big part of the unprecedented demand for the electric motorcycle was due to its novel sales method.

    Instead of offering the motorcycle for sale outright, Revolt developed a monthly pricing structure.

    The RV400 was offered for around US $50 per month for 37 months (or around US $1,850 over three years).

    Revolt also offered a lower spec RV300 model for around $42 per month.

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    Revolt RV400 electric motorcycle demand soars
    At a time when other Indian electric motorcycle companies are preparing to offer more premium electric motorcycles, Revolt’s pricing opened the door to many more customers. It even caused such large demand that the company had to temporarily stop taking orders last month.

    Revolt has since offered a second option for customers to buy the RV400 outright at a cost of around US $1,300.

    The Revolt RV400 electric motorcycle is designed to compete with 150cc motorcycles and carries a top speed of 85 km/h (53 mph). Its 3.25 kWh battery is rated for a range of up to 156 km (97 mi) on a single charge, though that range is when traveling at city speeds.

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    According to Rahul Sharma, Revolt’s Founder & Chief Revolutionary Officer, from the RV400’s launch event:

    “I have always been a believer in challenging the conventions, and today truly changes the game for the Indian two-wheeler industry. The RV 400 is the first step towards providing sustainable, affordable mobility to every Indian home. RV 400 challenges every convention that riders have pertaining to the EV’s – Power, Styling and Aesthetics, Range, Battery charging infrastructure, Security, Sound and Service.”

    If the Revolt bikes look familiar to you, it might be because they borrow heavily from the Super SOCO line of Chinese electric motorcycles. In fact, Revolt is reportedly working in a partnership with Super SOCO to produce the electric motorcycle in India. It wouldn’t be the first time that Super SOCO has partnered with other brands. The company teamed up with Ducati earlier this year to rework its electric scooter into a Ducati-badged scooter.

    The RV400 does show some differences when compared to the Super SOCO TC or TS models. In addition to minor body panel updates, the RV400 uses a mid-mounted motor with a belt drive, whereas the Super SOCO TC and TS models both use rear hub motors.
  8. jas67

    jas67 Long timer

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    $1,300 outright purchase, with a 3.5 KWh battery? Damn!
    What kind of battery? A 3.5 KWh Li-ion battery pack costs a good bit more than $1,300, at least here in the US.
    Granted, the economy in India is completely different, but, heck, even at $2,600 that'd be a good deal here.

    I'd love one of those with a little higher top speed, 60 MPH would be good for my commute.
  9. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Leaks on Harley-Davidson electric bicycles reveal new details

    Micah Toll - Oct. 23rd 2019 3:34 am ET

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    So far the only thing we’ve known about Harley-Davidson’s upcoming electric bicycles is that they are coming. But now we’ve received new info that sheds some light on what H-D is planning for the lightest motorbikes they’ve ever built.



    The new info comes to us by way of a Harley-Davidson dealership employee.

    Speaking to Electrek on condition of anonymity, he shared some new information provided by a high ranking member of the Harley-Davidson Dealership Advisory Council (DAC).

    According to the information provided, Harley-Davidson is planning to offer a range of e-bike speed classes. For Europe, Harley-Davidson would produce a lower power e-bike with a top speed of just 25 km/h (15.5 mph). Meanwhile, that model of e-bike in the US would receive a slightly higher 32 km/h (20 mph) top speed, classifying it as a Class 1 e-bike stateside.

    Harley-Davidson will apparently also be producing higher speed electric bicycles up to 45 km/h (28 mph) for the US market, according to the source.

    The prices of the bikes will fall in the $2,500 to $5,000 range, the source added.

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    And despite the initial press photos released by Harley-Davidson appearing to show e-bikes with just one brake lever, all of the e-bikes will have two brake levers. The confusion apparently came from the angles of the photos which made the brake levers all but disappear.

    The source also provided internal literature regarding Harley-Davidson’s design and planning process for the new electric bicycles. Interestingly though, this information contradicts the DAC regarding the speed of H-D’s electric bicycles.

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    According to an internal H-D communication intended to educate dealers and prepare them for the upcoming Harley-Davidson electric bicycles:

    Last month, we shared more information with you about H-D’s plans to enter the growing eBicycle market. Here we provide a primer on eBicycles to help you begin to prepare for the launch of these products in 2020.

    eBicycle Classes

    Various global government regulatory agencies have created a definition of an eBicycle, and the industry and those agencies have adopted very similar eBicycle rules that establish three classes of eBicycles:

    Class 1 pedal-assist eBicycles are the most popular, representing 88% of the global market. In Europe, Class 1 eBicycles are limited to 250 watts of power and the system cannot provide assistance over 25 kilometers per hour (15 mph). In the U.S. this class is limited to approximately 20 mph and can have up to 750 watts of power.

    Harley-Davidson will be pursuing Class 1 pedal-assist eBicycles only. Note that the Harley-Davidson electric bike concepts that were displayed at events in early 2019 are not eBicycles because they do not have pedals.

    That last line refers to a pair of H-D concept electric motorbikes, including a light electric dirt bike and an electric scooter. Both of which are expected to offer speeds in excess of 45 km/h (28 mph).

    [​IMG]

    Harley-Davidson’s upcoming electric scooter

    The critical part here though is the line that reads, “Harley-Davidson will be pursuing Class 1 pedal-assist eBicycles only.”

    So who is right? The DAC or the internal H-D literature? Could this be a case of crossed signals or just the early planning stages before designs are finalized ahead of the expected 2020 release? It’s hard to say, but the sudden surge of new info at least demonstrates that Harley-Davidson is not only making progress on their internal e-bike designs, but is already working to prepare its dealers for a new type of vehicle – something most dealers are likely to find foreign at first.

    And H-D isn’t just preparing on the hardware front either. The company has already trademarked the name “Rude Boy” for use with electric motorcycles, according to Motorcycle.com.

    With work on so many different fronts, the question of a Harley-Davidson e-bike is no longer “if?”, it’s now “when?”

    https://electrek.co/2019/11/05/harley-davidsons-electric-bicycles-get-their-first-public-debut/
  10. snowjob

    snowjob Thinking about bikes....

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    I applaud the choice of using the word "leaks" in the H-D headline. My kinda guy :-)
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  11. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    "Rude Boy"? Seriously?

    So HD thinks they can continue with the 'badass biker dude' image and it'll just morph seamlessly to e-scooters and light EMs? The marginalized malcontent is their target demographic? Purposely shunning the emotionally mature?

    The most successful motorcycle marketing campaign in the history of motorcycles was "You Meet the Nicest People on a Honda." It was uplifting for the entire industry, including HD. Apparently HD thinks the world doesn't have enough assholes.

    I hope someone gets videos of beer-gutted, tatted, booted, chain-walleted, bar-and-shield T-shirt-wearing Harley salesmen making pitches to potential customers for e-bikes. That has to be YouTube compilation gold right there.

    Maybe they can sell HD logo spandex shorts and jerseys in the clothing section.
  12. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    ^ Maybe they'll go direct-to-consumer and bypass their MC dealership. Ebikes will be serviced by bicycle shops anyhow.
  13. jas67

    jas67 Long timer

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  14. derblauereiter

    derblauereiter Mostly made of cheese Supporter

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    I mainly wanna know if the Harley e-bikes are Metric or SAE. Every bicycle manufacturer is metric these days, so if not sourcing components could get a little goofy.
  15. RedRocket

    RedRocket Yeah! I want Cheesy Poofs

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    Knowing Harley they’ll be half and half :lol3
  16. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Is a NIU electric motorcycle coming? These spy shots might imply so


    Micah Toll - Oct. 25th 2019 8:10 am ET

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    NIU is well known for its high tech electric scooters, which took off in China before receiving high acclaim upon their export to Europe. But recent spy shots received exclusively by Electrekshow that the electric scooter manufacturer might have its eyes on something bigger – in the form of a NIU electric motorcycle.

    Is this an upcoming NIU electric motorcycle?
    The spy shots in question show an electric motorcycle covered in camouflage. It appears to be sporting a chunky electric motor and has a pair of GoPro-style action cameras mounted to the body panels to monitor the rear of the bike.

    Full article: https://electrek.co/2019/10/25/niu-electric-motorcycle-spy-shots/
  17. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    First look at the new 2020 Energica Ego electric motorcycle

    Micah Toll - Oct. 30th 2019 1:46 pm ET


    Energica to unveil a shiny new motorcycle at the 2019 EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show next week.


    [​IMG]
    The new 2020 Energica Ego electric motorcycle


    But it won’t be the first time a sheet has been pulled off of the brand new, high-end racing motorcycle. That’s because Nico Rosberg, the 2016 Formula One world champion, beat them to it this week.

    He unveiled the new bike in a track test video, shown below.



    And it’s not like the current version of the Energica Ego needed any messing around with. The 150 mph (240 km/h) electric racing motorcycle already packs in 107 kW (145 hp) of raw electric power. But Energica didn’t become the leading European electric motorcycle manufacturer by resting on its laurels.

    The new 2020 Energica Ego is said to come with increased range and power, among other upgrades to the spec sheet.

    Not that we get to see those new figures yet, of course. Energica may have let Rosberg pull the veil off the new bike and make some hot laps, but they have to hold something back until the EICMA show next week.


    The new 2020 Energica Ego marks the first major update to the line in a few years. While Energica took to the 2018 EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show with an impressive booth to show off its vehicles, the center stage attraction last year was a concept bike built in partnership with Samsung. The Energica Bolid-E concept was designed to demonstrate new technologies that could be integrated into electric motorcycles, such as rider awareness tools and side/rearview cameras instead of mirrors.

    [​IMG]

    But the 2020 Energica Ego promises to be a more substantial update to the line (and one you can actually buy). In addition to some obvious aesthetic modifications, the biggest hardware change visible in the unveiling video seems to be the battery pack, indicating that Energica might have broken new ground on battery capacity and thus effective riding range.
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  18. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    KYMCO announces RevoNex electric maxi scooter — or is it an electric motorcycle?

    Micah Toll - Oct. 29th 2019 4:44 am ET


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    KYMCO has just announced a new electric scooter to be unveiled at the 2019 EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show. But the new KYMCO RevoNex isn’t your standard little electric scooter. It’s a maxi scooter that seems to blur the line between electric scooters and electric motorcycles.


    KYMCO RevoNex set to debut
    KYMCO took to the 2018 EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show to unveil its first electric motorcycle, the 155 mph (250 km/h) KYMCO SuperNex.

    And based on KYMCO’s announcement just hours ago, this year, the company plans to return with another powerful electric two-wheeler known as the KYMCO RevoNex.

    KYMCO only released a single teaser drawing, shown below, which features a rear quarter view of the RevoNex.

    And despite describing the RevoNex as a maxi scooter, the bike certainly gives off more of an electric motorcycle vibe to me. With its faux gas tank, near lack of a step-through design, large wheels, and sportbike-style pillion pegs, KYMCO appears to be playing fast and loose with the term “maxi scooter.”

    Maxi scooters are generally defined as a class of automatic transmissions scooters featuring larger engines and capable of higher speeds. This often means a shift toward larger wheels to safely and comfortably accommodate those speeds, as well as an increase in standover height to accommodate larger motors (or larger batteries, in the case of electric scooters, which have physically smaller electric motors). So in a way, maxi scooters are already encroaching upon motorcycle territory. But this seems more like hopping the fence to me.

    To be fair, there aren’t very many electric maxi scooters on the market yet for comparison. The best examples are currently the BMW C Evolution and the Silence S01.

    The BMW C Evolution is a high-power maxi scooter, packing a 35 kW (48 hp) motor putting out 72 Nm (53 lb-ft) of torque. It has a max speed of 129 km/h (80 mph) and includes a BMW i-series battery with 12.7 kWh of capacity. That gives the scooter a range of 159 km (99 miles). Those specs put it in a similar performance class as a Zero FXS electric motorcycle, though with a bit more range than the Zero.

    [​IMG]
    BMW C Evolution electric maxi scooter

    The Silence S01 has a smaller 11 kW peak rear hub motor and a max speed of 100 km/h (62 mph). The scooter’s novel trolley-style 5 kWh rolling batteries offer a maximum range of 115 km (71 miles), though likely at a slower average speed.

    We don’t yet have any specs on the KYMCO RevoNex, so it’s hard to say how it will compare to the few existing electric maxi scooter options on the market.

    Between the two, the Silence S01’s price of around US $7,000 is certainly more enticing than the BMW C Evolution’s price of approximately US $14,000. But KYMCO’s production capacity and Taiwanese manufacturing advantage could help the RevoNex severely undercut both of those competitors.
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  19. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    More electric mopeds take the US by storm as Texas welcomes Revel moped-share

    Micah Toll - Nov. 2nd 2019 3:50 am ET


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    Revel’s electric moped sharing program has been on a roll with expansion across the US. The latest city to get the fast little EVs is Austin, Texas, which was helped by new electric moped friendly legislation.


    What are Revel electric mopeds?
    Revel’s electric mopeds are two-seaters that can be parked anywhere in a city within the company’s operating limits.

    Riders can rent the electric mopeds for just $1 to start and $0.25 per minute of riding, or $0.10 per minute while parked, if riders want to keep a scooter waiting for them while they run into a store.

    Each of Revel’s rides comes with two DOT-certified three quarter helmets in the storage compartment (and sanitary paper hair covers, if sharing helmets freaks you out).

    The electric scooters started out with a pilot program in Brooklyn last year with Torrot scooters, but then expanded with a full fleet of 1,000 electric scooters sourced from electric scooter manufacturer NIU.

    The company then expanded further with 400 electric scooters in Washington, DC.

    [​IMG]

    Now the company is ready for its next expansion, and this time it has its sight set on Austin, Texas. Revel will deploy 1,000 electric scooters in the Lone Star State’s capital.

    The move was helped by moped-friendly legislation that was recently pushed through the state government to facilitate Revel’s arrival and help reduce hurdles for moped use in general.

    According to Texas State Representative Matt Krause:

    “Since I began serving on the Texas House Transportation Committee, it has been my focus to find solutions to ease traffic congestion and get rid of burdensome regulations that only further congestion. So when my office got the opportunity to file legislation that would make it easier for Texans to operate mopeds and cut out unnecessary regulations, I was eager to get something to the governor’s desk so we can keep Texans moving.”


    :clap Very good news indeed!
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  20. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    The Beast 2.0 e-bike is the monster truck of electric bicycles

    Micah Toll - Nov. 2nd 2019 12:18 pm ET


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    Whoever said “everything in moderation” obviously never took a ride on the new Daymak Beast 2.0 e-bike. There’s nothing moderate about this ridiculous yet awesome display of a monster electric bicycle – emphasis on the “electric” and a mere passing nod to the “bicycle”.


    Look no further than the massive frame or the giant tires and you’ll quickly realize this isn’t your run of the mill e-bike.

    Instead, Toronto-based Daymak focused on building the ultimate off-road two-wheeler that just happens to also have pedals.

    The Daymak Beast 2.0 electric bike
    Those pedals, which some like to call vestigial pedals, are fully functional yet aren’t likely to get a lot of use. They’re mounted way far back and have the tiniest of crank arms. But they work, and that classifies it as an electric bicycle for all legal intents and purposes.

    But the rest of the Daymak Beast 2.0? That seems like a full on ATV/dirt bike hybrid.

    [​IMG]

    The Daymak Beast 2.0 is rolling on giant 21″ x 7″ x 10″ tires – a size that is normally reserved for ATVs. The rear wheel houses a hub motor that is rated at 500W, but is almost certainly underrated. The legal limit for e-bikes in Canada is 500W, but this sucker looks suspiciously like the 1.5 kW motor I put on my 40 mph (64 km/h) electric bicycle. But hey, the spec sheet says “500 W” so we’ll take them at their word.

    Of course that’s even harder to do once you realize that the Daymak Beast 2.0 is also sporting a 60V battery, which is capable of much more power than the average e-bike battery. The Beast 2.0 actually comes with three different battery options: a 1.8 kWh SLA battery, 2.4 kWh Li-ion battery, or a cutting edge 1.5 kWh Lithium-titanate (LTO) battery. The last one is a high tech (and high price) battery that is capable of lasting up to 20,000 charge cycles. Compare that to the typical 800-1,000 cycles of conventional Li-ion batteries!

    Back on the hardware side, the Daymak Beast 2.0 features an inverted suspension fork up front and dual coilover shocks in the rear. For stopping power, the bike is packing front and rear hydraulic disc brakes.



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    Speed is limited on road to 20 mph (32 km/h) to meet existing e-bike regulations. But you can put the Daymak Beast 2.0 in off-road mode when you leave the asphalt and that will bump the speed up to 25 mph (45 km/h). The adjustment can be performed via a smartphone app thanks to Bluetooth connectivity built into the controller. That Bluetooth connectivity also gives riders the opportunity to fine tune the controller to their liking and adjust ride and performance parameters.

    All of this comes in a 100% street legal package that is designed to handle the asphalt or the trails equally well. The entry level SLA-powered model is priced at $2,999 and comes with a 50 km (31 mi) range. The Li-ion battery model is priced at $4,999 and has a range of 60 km (37 mi). If you want the LTO model, you’ll have to wait a bit longer. That one doesn’t even have a price yet.

    [​IMG]
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