EMT's and emergency release cheek pads

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by ElRod, Jun 7, 2019.

  1. ElRod

    ElRod Drifter

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    Wasn't sure how widely known these were in our community so I stopped by our local fire station to just make them aware if they weren't already. Seems I was met with more hostility than interest....."Don't worry we will get it off of you". Trying to explain further I could see this was going nowhere.

    Makes me wonder if this is even mentioned in their training ???

    helmet.jpg
    #1
  2. scootertrog

    scootertrog Jedi Fart Master

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    I highly doubt it, I certainly wouldn't purchase a helmet based solely wether or not it had this feature. A couple years ago when I had my accident, the EMT's were motorcycle riders and we chatted a little about gear. Though these folks were aware of things like this, they told me the average EMT will pull out the knife or scissors and chop up your stuff without thinking about how to remove it.
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  3. FieldSanitation

    FieldSanitation Adventurer

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    they love their toys... seriously. I killed my first deer when I was living in Texas and came to in the middle of the highway staring at the sky. I was able to flip/roll myself off to the side of the road, but I couldn't stand or even sit up. The EMT's wanted to cut off my leather jacket, and I declined, and showed them I could take it off (I did) and then they said they were going to cut my helmet off my head. I was like "NOPE" in my head... and so I said "no, don't worry, I can get that off too!" and I proceeded to remove the helmet under the watchful eyes of the EMTs... but while those fkrs were waiting and carefully watching that I didn't hurt myself or show signs of pain, they had prepared this damn neckbrace thing, so as soon as I got the helmet off my and and before I could do the PRELL SHAMPOO hair shake, they slapped that on my neck and laid me down on a backboard. I cussed them out for not warning me about that... and we bantered back and forth and they ended up telling me that they really like practicing with the jaws of life and the supersaw they carry around with them...

    or you got a buncha cocky mf'rs in that station who are so awesome they don't need you telling them how to do their job.... ;)
    #3
  4. ElRod

    ElRod Drifter

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    Yeah, I get it. I don't care they cut the chin strap off. But if by pulling these removable cheek pads off allow gently removing the helmet without further possible spinal injury instead of yanking or sawing it off I'm all for them.
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  5. Heloflights

    Heloflights Been here awhile

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    I am a EMT in VA...in EMT school we were taught to remove motorcycle helmets at the scene so we can check then stabilize c-spine (via cervical collar and backboard). Due to the variety of helmets on the market there is no attempt made in school to educate students on the removable pads etc. that some helmets may have.
    #5
  6. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    Fortunately protocols have changed over the years. The need for full blown C-spine precautions has been greatly reduced. So most likely any EMT who is up on protocol is unlikely to hack up expensive gear.

    I worked fire full time for 30 and ski patrol for 20, still do. I can say the times we actually cut expensive riding or skiing gear off were extremely rare. Not to say some cowboy medic isn't itching to try out his brand new trauma shears. Now removing some everyday clothing in a true medical emergency is a different story.
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  7. Smoke Eater 3

    Smoke Eater 3 Long timer Supporter

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    Belligerant asshole...check. Probably a head injury. They were doing their job. Don't be an idiot and crash then complain about getting proper help.
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  8. Smoke Eater 3

    Smoke Eater 3 Long timer Supporter

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    It's great to donate expired or scuffed helmet to your local EMS so we can practice the removal.
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  9. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    Following today's protocol and common sense I wouldn't have gone full blown C-spine. Head injury in itself does not warrant it. Plenty of evidence and studies out there to support extremely limited use of collars and LBB.
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  10. FieldSanitation

    FieldSanitation Adventurer

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    I think I am misunderstanding you... or you took offense that I dissed your profession by categorizing a younger bulletproof generation who didn't want to hear from a motorcyclist.

    I am not a BELLIGERENT ASSHOLE unless provoked. a deer jumped out in front of my motorcycle and put me over the handlebars, which doesn't quite qualify me as being an idiot. and I fully enjoyed the conversation with the EMT's and sheriffs who arrived to help take care of me. AND later that spring, I happened to MEET the wonderful EMT's at a wedding I was invited to and thanked all of them for getting me to the hospital. Thanks to wearing the proper gear, they were VERY happy to hear that I'd only bruised ribs.


    Kiss my ass for not fully understanding my perspective @Smoke Eater 3
    #10
  11. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Retired FF/EMT with 22 years experience. If you crash and are in good enough shape to remove your own jacket, helmet, etc., before they arrive, then you won't need the emergency responders to do it. If you are badly enough hurt or unconscious and cannot remove these items yourself, then you should be very happy that responders are following their protocols and cutting things off you, etc. as fast as possible to get you the care you need asap. Last I knew, no one was trained to remove cheek pads....
    #11
  12. ElRod

    ElRod Drifter

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    I thought I would post this upstairs to get reasonable responses as I usually dwell downstairs and expect this kind of angst. Evidently I was wrong. I'm getting the same responses as I did at the firehouse. What can be so hard as to embrace a new technology that benefits us all? I have removed the cheek pads (takes about 10 seconds) and the helmet nearly falls off on it's own.....no need to saw it off or pull unnecessarily to remove.
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  13. elron

    elron Still Standing Supporter

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    I did give you a like because you had a legit question and issue. But I also have to say ... when it comes to Emergency situations people coming to your aid need to think fast and act fast. However, to say that EMTs s/b trained to add one more step for an only sometimes situation detracts from that. The only way it could or s/b part of the "standard" protocol is if it was a universal application ...that is to say via regulation all helmets are required too have that system, then it would be a worthwhile step to have. And of course we all know how motorcyclists love & react to being regulated.
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  14. ElRod

    ElRod Drifter

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    Let me say first I'm not bitching about how the EMT's respond. Thank you all for a job well done in a riders time of need. I just don't understand how a few minutes in training can't be devoted to addressing this technology that can save possible crucial moments in an emergency.
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  15. bmiller59

    bmiller59 Been here awhile

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    Elrod, I agree with you, which is why I related some info. There is a certain amount of bravado in the world of EMS. I was subject to it myself early on. But that was a long time ago. I'm not bashful about calling it out. Too bad the local guys ignored you, they could have learned something.
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  16. ElRod

    ElRod Drifter

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    Bmiller59. Reminds me of an old Steve Martin skit. "Hey, look at this new thing"........ audio of door SLAMMING SHUT. See ya, going back downstairs.
    #16
  17. a2ronm

    a2ronm Ti-6Al-4V

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    When I participated in a demonstration of the principal that 2 objects cannot occupy the same physical space at the same time , Ford Explorer vs. Ducati Multistrada-the Ducati and I Iost:

    20141210_210955.jpg

    I went over the Explorer picking up a couple of compound fractures before hitting the asphalt on the other side.

    An off-shift ER nurse/Good Samaritan was the actual 1st responder and she asked if my helmet had removable cheek pads (Shoei Qwest) it didn't and there wasnt an urgent need to remove it (I was laying on my side in the middle of the road) so the helmet stayed on for the EMT's. They got it off without tools after supporting my neck- I don't remember the cheek pad question being asked again.

    So the nurse knew enough to ask, but not what removable pads looked like.

    The EMT's wanted to cut off my Klim Badlands jacket, but I wouldnt let them since I could get it off (with help) after they stabilized my leg-they still got to use the trauma shears on my boot, sock and pants so they were happy.

    Since I was going to "retire" the crashed helmet anyway (per manufacturers recommendation) it wouldnt matter if they had cut it off, but they didnt seem concerned either way. I imagine that had I not been conscious or there was evidence of head or neck trauma it would have had them cut if off anyway....which would have been fine with me if that had been the situation.

    There was enough going on to keep everyone busy once the EMT"s arrived, I was just happy the professionals got everything sorted out....and got me out of the street.
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  18. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Maybe you ought to volunteer with your local fire/ems service so you can learn how they train and about what they actually do when they respond to an emergency. Then you can enlighten them with your thoughts about proper training and response techniques. :augie
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  19. lacofdfireman

    lacofdfireman Long timer Supporter

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    21 years as a professional Firefighter with one of the largest agencies in the country. 7 more years until retirement. . Been on literally hundreds of motorcycle accidents as I’ve worked some stations on extremely popular motorcycles roads. If we cut off your gear it’s because we are being cautious about further injuring you. Removing a helmet is an intricate process and sometimes gets left on unless airway is compromised. I don’t get why people complain about getting their gear cut off. We don’t do it unnecessarily.. If someone says don’t cut it we won’t. Unless they have a broken arm or so,etching inside the jacket and it’s going to cause additional injury trying to remove the clothing without cutting it off. But don’t crash and then be a jerk. We are there to help.
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  20. lacofdfireman

    lacofdfireman Long timer Supporter

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    We very rarely do full c-spine anymore. It seems to cause more issues at times. Modified is so much better.
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