1. Adventure Rider Print Magazine!
    We're doing a print magazine this November - 128 pages of high quality adventure riding stories, photography and interviews!

    Click here to purchase a copy for $9. Limited copies still available.
    Dismiss Notice

Enduristan Monsoon 3 VS MoskoMoto Backcountry

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by letsgetlost, Jul 2, 2018.

  1. letsgetlost

    letsgetlost Unnamed Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    South East Asia
    I’m planning a 4 months trip and I wanted to have a suitable soft pannier for my KTM 690 Enduro R. After plenty of research, I decided on the backcountry. I brought it for a short regional trip, and I have been using it for a few months locally, these are my comments.

    MoskoMoto Backcountry

    Installation (5/5)
    Installation was easy and straightforward. Everything clipped on well and I still had some spare pucks left that attaches to the wedge. A hex key set is required. I also installed these bags on a 990 and the longer pucks made everything easy to install. I Realise it’s probably not necessary to install all 4 pucks, 3 will probably suffice if you wanted to save a little weight.

    Build Quality (5/5)
    With multiple layers of tough (but heavy) fabric and an additional beavertail at the sides, the BC was extremely tough and even with plenty of drops, it still looked brand new. The wedge seemed very solid as well and each puck had 4 long bolts, for a total of 16 bolts mounting the wedge to the frame.

    Usability (3/5)
    Maybe I’m too used to hard panniers, but going in and out of the panniers, un-clipping/clipping the side buckles and the locking strap (from steelcore) became a dreaded exercise especially when I forgot to put something back in the bag. If I didn’t have the steelcore cable, maybe it’ll be better.

    Expandability (5/5)
    The MOLLE webbing is brilliant, I wonder why all the manufacturers don’t do such a simple thing. Everything attaches easily though I feel they could have found a lighter solution to the pegs attaching the pouches to the backcountry. Yes, it’s tough, but I’m sure there’s something easier and lighter. Still, top marks for such a simple thing.

    Lockability (4/5)
    As a deterrent, the steelcore straps seem to serve its unintended purpose, however I really hate using it. If I take the BC off the frame, the steelcore straps need to be unhooked, rerouted etc.. it’s all very fiddly, I do hope a locking buckle gets installed soon in the BC. The BC also comes with a lockable catch that attaches to the rack. Very clever.

    Transportability/Weight (1/5)
    First up, it’s very easy to remove the bags from the bike. With a single handed twist of the catch, the bags are ready to be taken off (although the catch sometimes fall and re-latches the pull again). The bags are heavy, and with the content it does becomes very obvious. The non-ergonomic and thin carrying handle is also offset, which makes carrying the bag to be really difficult, causing the frame back to hit your shin every other step of the way. Combine it with your own duffel bag and other items, it becomes a real pain in the neck every time I stop at the hotel. After the first night, I left the bags on the bike itself and covered the bike.

    How can it be improved ? I think the whole point of the BC is its toughness, and reducing the weight of the fabric may compromise the toughness of the bag, so let’s not go there.. If I could choose, the wedge holder on the back of the bike will be redesigned to leave more of it on the bike, thus reducing the bag’s weight. The rear lining need not be that tough as well, so unnecessary fabric weight is removed, leaving most of the toughness on the sides and back of the bag. Lastly, i’ll redesign the carrying handle so that even if the bag was heavy, the ergonomics and position of the carrying handle will help greatly.

    Backcountry Conclusion
    Bottom line is, if you’re on a big bike, going off-road, camping and the bag can remain on the bike, this is a must-have. There’s plenty of areas for tie downs and it sits perfectly on the frame. If you’re doing a 50/50 dirt/urban touring with hotel visits lining the trip, hauling the BC from hotel to bike is going to be a problem, especially if you have other luggages with you. I think this is perfect for a big ADV bike going for off-road camping where you’ll always be by your bike.


    Enduristan Monsoon 3

    Installation (3/5)
    I have to say, I was rather perturbed with the installation of the Monsoon 3s. First up, the stiffener panel which was supposed to be installed at the base didn’t sit 100% properly in the bag from end to end. Not a big deal, but for an OCD person like me, I got a bit irked. Perhaps I was wrong, I’ll investigate again, however both bags seemed to have the same issue. Again not a big deal. It was easy to velcro the top straps, but when it came time to install the bottom two rokstraps, I got slightly annoyed again. The top part of the monsoons is strapped to each other with velcro, and the bottom part has 2 buckles that clip to the bottom of the frame. The end of the monsoons go through the rear rack to give it some lateral support. I had no problems with the top and sides, but because my frame was short, the sides of the monsoons went past downwards the frame so there wasn’t much vertical tension from the bottom. Easy enough right ?

    Just pull the top part of the monsoons together more, but after I did that, I realised it distorted the top parts of the bag and it stretched over the top part of my frame, causing the bag to lean over the top part of the frame and reducing the useable storage space. I thought the rokstraps idea inside was great, but it didn’t seem to fit my tiny frames properly, I’m sure it’ll fit bigger bikes well. I added some stuff in the bags and my monsoons looked a little distorted. I will have to do some kind of modification.

    I think it’ll help greatly if there were additional slots above the end slots so bikes with smaller frames can still have some strong lower tension. I’ll probably have to cut the slots myself but I don’t want to do it now in case I want to sell the monsoons. I strongly believe a better tensioner can be designed for the back using the rokstrap ideas.

    Another think that I hated were the excessive straps all flapping around.. yes there were elastic straps to keep these orphans but I wonder when it’ll come loose. Again, cutting it will make it perfect but I’ll only do it on the eve of my trip when I’m very sure I’m using these bags.

    Another thing I noticed was the stiffener panels installed at the bottom causes the bag to be permanently wide. It means if the bag is empty, you can’t easily flatten it unless you go into the bag, fold up the stiffener.

    Build Quality (5/5)
    The build quality is excellent, everything seem to be seamed properly, the overall look of the bag is great. The fabric is noticeably much thinner than the BCs, which explains the lower weight. I’m not sure how it’ll hold up for continuous around the world expedition where the bike will fall continuously on the bags, and the fact that enduristan provides a repair kit must explain that holes should be expected. However, I think on-road touring should be fine, time will tell. The buckles seem to be much smaller than the mosko ones, but I think it will hold up. The female buckle is attached directly to the bag, I’m not sure yet if this will cause problems, but because it’s attached, the angle in which the male meets the female must be parallel to the surface the female it sits on, potentially this might not be the best considering it becomes a little less flexible, but it definitely looks much neater.

    Usability (3/5)
    Because there’s no beaver tail or any other side pockets, the monsoons large wells were easy to fill and access. Even though the monsoons have 3 straps + the lockstep similarly to the backcountry, I found the lighter material easier to roll/unroll and access. Again, How I wish for some zipper and flaps. There’s no beavertail, so usability level becomes slightly worse than the BC. Another thing to note is the BC roll top seem to allow for more rolls vs the monsoon which kind of stops at 3 rolls+. I think it’s because of the size of the horizontal strips which means you have to either roll thick or thin. On my 690 E/R, I sit on the front straps, which makes me slide around. The velcro also sometimes stretch due to the weight of the contents.. I do wonder how long it can last if you don’t put something else to secure it to each other. Another annoying thing is the enduristans deforms easily. If your bag isn’t full, it’ll look absolutely strange. Another strange thing that I encountered was the cleaning of the bag. I went through some mud and it had plenty of mud stains. It took 5 washes with different cleaning solvents to remove the mud stains. Because it’s so textured, a lot of the stains couldn’t come off easily. Just a note.

    Expandability (2/5)
    The lack of any small pockets, beaver tail was absolutely annoying. I had to unbuckle the 3 clasps + my locking strap when I wanted to throw some litter away. There’s little hope of adding any additional fuel pouches or any form of pouch on the front, sides and back due to the lack of molle straps.. To be fair, there are some nylon loop straps on the top part of the bags and I know enduristan sells the bottle holster which attaches to the top loops. However, I think accessing the bag with the holster intact will prove to be a little troublesome, I’m curious why Enduristan doesn’t add any attachments on the sides of the bag. Maybe they don’t want to cover the reflective panels. I can add some molle straps, but that’ll take a lot of sewing and I don’t wish to make any holes just right now.

    Lockability (1/5)
    By itself, the monsoons don’t provide any form of lock ability. I ported the steelcore over and disappointingly there’s only loops at the top I can fit the steelcore straps through, the bottom is just hanging free.

    Transportability/Weight (5/5)
    Because the fabric weight is so much less, the bag itself becomes way much lighter. I like that Enduristan made a ergonomic grip which makes carrying the bag so much easier. This to me is the main reason why I got this bag.


    Final Conclusion

    The main reason why I bought the Enduristans to try was because I felt the Backcountry was a little too heavy. However after I encountered the Enduristans’ lack of pockets, the constantly deforming bags, the slipping bag, the intrusive velcro straps, I decided the additional weight of the BC was worth it after all.

    If budget is an issue, the enduristans are ok for its price, albeit the lack of expandability does make it slightly annoying.
    If budget isn’t an issue, the Backcountries are the bomb.


    My Wishlist for the BC Improvements

    1. Locking for the BC bag buckles. If the top buckle can be integrated with the locking clasp (to the rack), one single lock can do the job of locking the bag and securing the bag to the rack.
    2. A little lighter material where it’s not needed (roll top, rear) to reduce the weight a little bit.
    3. A more ergonomic handle at the top for easier carrying, and a more centralised position so carrying won’t be awkward. A handle perhaps on the side of the bag instead of top ? Who says carrying the bag must be upright.
    4. A rethink of the quick release glass nylon mounting to bring down the weight, I feel it can be improved with a little brainstorming, with a product engineer.
    5. The Beavertail could perhaps do with a stretchable strap so i don’t need to release the side straps to fit things in.. I can just pull it hard, which also helps with securing the gear automatically.
    6. A simple zippered pocket at the top flap (after you roll down) to just throw valuables in (eg. tissue, coins etc). I know there’s one in the inside beaver tail, but it’s not very accessible if the straps are already secured tightly. This will reduce the need for a tank bag.

    Backcountry.jpg Enduristan.jpg

    Enduristan-Dirty.jpg
    #1
  2. Applecrate

    Applecrate Smell It First

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2013
    Oddometer:
    474
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I like to hear the good and bad and you did a nice honest job of it. I haven’t seen many direct complaints about the backcountry bags and I appreciate your candor.

    I wonder how either brand would stack up against the Kriega Overlander series. I think they are lighter and simpler to use.
    #2
  3. letsgetlost

    letsgetlost Unnamed Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    South East Asia
    Thank you Criaklr & Applecrate, I realised there wasn't many detailed reviews on the Monsoons but I did read (repeatedly) the review from Chris Scott [https://adventure-motorcycling.com/2012/04/11/enduristan-monsoon-review/]

    I regret not taking more photographs during my offroad trip on the monsoons so one can see the lopsidedness of the bags.

    I do hope someone will do a non-sponsored review on the Lonerider Motobag and Kriegas soon. Both are pricey to me (since I've already invested in 2 pannier sets), but maybe they might be worth the money.
    #3
  4. K1W1

    K1W1 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,660
    Location:
    Dandenong Ranges, Australia
    Love my Endurustan Monsoons. I want them because they do not have excessive straps, pockets, flaps or mounting brackets. All the things the OP does not like so I guess that proves once again that what works for one does not work for another. They are wide I will give you that but they are dead easy to install hold heaps are bombproof in construction. Mine have never moved or caused me any issues and have never let even a drop of water in despite being in torrential rain for a week at one stage. I wash mine with a pressure washer and no soap once or twice a year whether they need it or not. :D

    I also have some Giant Loop MotoTrek panniers that are smaller than the Monsoons and that mount directly to the paniier frames rather than being throw over. I use them on day or overnight trips. Compared to the Monsoons that are a real PITA to install and get tight and use an if the OP thinks there are excessive length straps on the Enduristan products he really should look at the GL panniers. The rear mounting straps are so long they almost it the ground and have to be literally wound around the pannier frame and tied off to keep them out of the way.
    #4
    Manray and Enduristan USA like this.
  5. letsgetlost

    letsgetlost Unnamed Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    South East Asia
    Hi Kiwi

    I do agree with you that the enduristan may work for some people and bikes more than others. I do like the simplicity on the monsoons that was why I decided to put some money down. Another point was I like the cavernous mouth in which to stuff my things in, it seemed much easier than the backcountries.

    Another point I would like to add is the tank bag and duffel from Enduristans (Sandstorm 4x and Tornado) and MoskoMoto (Nomad Tank bag & Scout 60) which I also have, these are all similar in nature to their side pannier brethren. The Nomad tank bag was feature packed with tons of pocket, but I found it to impede my movement while standing, and I found the plentiful features to be a little cumbersome to use, not to mention it was heavy on its own. I decided on the Enduristan Sandstorm 4x which was simple and bombproof. Similarly the Tornado duffel was light and function-able vs the scout which I used for a long time. I think a good summary of Enduristan is its simplicity vs Moskomoto which is feature packed (at a slight weight gain).
    #5
  6. advlust

    advlust Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2014
    Oddometer:
    490
    I am looking at getting the Monsoon 3 for my 690 Enduro R. Has anyone tried to leave the main connecting straps under the seat for their 690?, these actually go over the seat.

    In the below video at 1:40, you will see the guy has set up the straps under the seat. Not the same bike though.

    And is it possible to mount these without the pannier racks on the 690?

    #6
  7. Bkadv2

    Bkadv2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Oddometer:
    181
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    i just did 40k km on the monsoon 3, fell many times/lowside etc and they still brilliant

    many bad roads, but the monsoon hung on tight(with addition of steelcore helping it stay on my rack frame better)

    Loop steelcores around pannier rack frame and then around the monsoon 3...no hanging

    I put a piece of cardboard box(cut out) so they monsoon 3 dont become sloppy.

    extremely waterproof, dont need inner liners

    only con: a tad wide. but no problem for me, as i lane split easily with it in ulanbatar for example...if u been there in rush hour you would know :D

    thnx
    #7
    Enduristan USA and SuzyMoto like this.
  8. W.S.

    W.S. Just a guy

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2016
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    Willamette National Forest
    Just got the Monsoon 3 bags recently to mount to my XR650l. One thing I did right away is replace the velcro over-the-seat straps with some 2" nylon webbing and ladder locks. Much thinner to sit on.

    I'm not using racks, just a heat shield on the exhaust. Took some experimenting for the lower straps as I have removed the passenger pegs. So far these seem like the simple solution I have been looking for though I haven't been able to test them on a trip yet. I am not using the plastic stiffeners, so they can cinch down when empty.

    Attached Files:

    #8
  9. SuzyMoto

    SuzyMoto Flying up to Sky

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    Emerald city
    Hi, I checked your IG, and the Monsoon bags on your CRF Rally look really good! I've been debating to get either the monsoon bags or GL MotoTrek panniers. I have MoskoMoto BC 35L and the Reckless 80, but I don't like them much. Spent too much money on them and ended up disliking them.

    Would you mind sharing how you put a piece of cardboard box? Pics maybe?
    #9
    Bkadv2 likes this.
  10. Bkadv2

    Bkadv2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Oddometer:
    181
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    ill get the pics tmr for you



    mototrek panniers, look small(not bad though) to me and 6 lbs total weight, not bad. hooking them up worries me.

    mosko moto BC 35L IS heavyyyy at 9 lbs per side...so 18 lbs and still need a rack..or mounting location

    reckless 80 looks okay but its 11.3 lbs...yes its RACK less but i like to have rack for many reasons..(my rack is probably 4 -5 lbs)

    monsoon 3 is light weight, i dont have exact weight. probably 6 lbs

    another one is magadan panniers from adventure spec, they weigh about 10 lbs for the pair but if you replace liner, you can get them down to around 6-7 lbs.

    new kriega os 32 weighs in at around 12 lbs for the pair...lmao



    One crucial thing for any soft luggage i guess, is get them tight and dont let them be loose.

    anyway, I will transition to magadan panniers, for the narrowness benefit. Not yet but whenever I have the funds to do so but I will take my time as my current monsoon are working fine

    first pic, 20~25 lbs of meat per pannier and unbuckled straps

    i have cardboard box on the SIDE outside portion in the inside lol :(( ill get pics tmr for you haha


    crfrallyloadedluggage2.jpg


    camping_usa.jpg
    #10
    SuzyMoto likes this.
  11. NilesHenry

    NilesHenry Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Oddometer:
    78
    Location:
    Maryland
    Read and appreciate the review of the Mosko 35 which I am considering. I am allso interested in how the Mosko stacks up against the Kriega OS.
    #11
  12. SuzyMoto

    SuzyMoto Flying up to Sky

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    Emerald city

    Thanks! I'm looking forward to the cardboard box pics :)

    For Kriega OS-36, which is 18L each is about 3lb each bag. I think you were referring to biggest OS-32, right? That is very big! lol
    I'm curious about Magadan panniers. Will research on them :clap

    Mosko bags are indeed durable and rigid construction. I got hit by a car at 75mph on freeway, and the BC35 held up and kept my camping gears very clean. The bike was totaled though. But, they were pretty heavy for single cylinder bikes, defeats the bike's purpose for light traveling. Reckless 80 is OK, but I always find the tubing figure troublesome to pack and unpack.
    #12
    Bkadv2 likes this.
  13. SuzyMoto

    SuzyMoto Flying up to Sky

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    Emerald city
    Here are some pictures of my bike with MoskoMoto Reckeless 80 and BC35.

    IMG_0260.jpg

    IMG_0356.jpg

    IMG_0059.jpg

    IMG_0160.jpg
    #13
    Oeths, davidji, Bkadv2 and 1 other person like this.
  14. Bkadv2

    Bkadv2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Oddometer:
    181
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    yeh the os 32 seem to be very heavy. os 36 look nice. I have the waterproof kriega book bag. Held up very well and still looks new and these new OS system seem to be using the same inner as the book bag. nice.


    wow that BC35 must be really strong very nice!. I dont like many rackless systems because...straps here and straps there! too many. but the OS 36 look nice.

    monsoon 3.jpg

    monsoon.jpg

    locks very neatly when bag is closed with the cardboard box, outside is flat and not drooping with my luggage trying to poke out..especially with the bike leaning on side stand
    #14
    Enduristan USA and SuzyMoto like this.
  15. SuzyMoto

    SuzyMoto Flying up to Sky

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    Emerald city
    Nice and simply! I like the cardboard :clap Thanks so much for posting photos!
    #15
    Bkadv2 likes this.
  16. PaulBarton

    PaulBarton Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    2,504
    Location:
    Seattle
    I know I'm way late to this party but happened to stumble upon this thread...

    I have the the Monsoons and really like them. The key feature for me was fully waterproof. I have several Enduristan products - the Sandstorm tankbag was my first experience with the company and I was impressed with the build quality and customer service -- after a year or so the adhesive on the velcro for the map pocket failed. I sent them the body of the bag and they sent me a brand new one. No issues since.

    Monsoons - I find them very easy to install on my 1150GS. I run the straps under the pillion seat/cargo basket so they are relatively safe from an opportunistic thief but I do have to remove/reinstall the pillion seat or cargo basket whenever they go off/on. ROKstraps are easy to locate and secure. Last summer, I did 2000 miles through BC and Alberta with them. I was rackless with lowered muffler/heat shield. They remained remarkably stable.

    As the mfg claims, my gear remained dry, dustless and damage-free the whole trip - although the waterproofness wasn't tested too much on that trip as fires were the biggest issue. They have survived many deluges before and since.

    They are wide but I run 10" Jesse hard panniers in the city and they aren't any wider than those and MUCH lighter.

    They are 30L per side. The BC35's used to come 25/35 for exhaust considerations. At the time I got mine the volume was a push. The BC35 also wouldn't work with my Jesse rack so I would have had to buy/figure out a rack for mounting. I have been enamored with the Mosko Moto stuff (especially since they are relatively local to me) but just as K1W1 said, I really like the simplicity of the Enduristan product. The Beaver Tail is a cool feature but I've come to realize that I prefer the loose jacket or other stuff that I would store under that tail to be on top and lashed down versus lashed to the outside. That's just my preference. The BC Duffle would suit this need.

    I'm not sure why the OP was knocking the expandability of the Monsoons. There are plenty of lashing points to add to the volume. I have Tornado 2S's (25L) that strap to the top of both my Monsoons and Jesses and ride quite well -- once again -- Fully Waterproof unlike the exterior pockets/add-ons to the BC35s. TBH, this is way too much volume but it can be done. I also have XS Base Packs (Small) that can mount to the top of the panniers. They add about 6.5L to each side. The Base Pack has the elasticized cinch strap for wet/loose items to be fastened to the outside and it's got a mesh-like exterior pocket for similar items. Plenty of molle lashing points around the perimeter. And....wait for it....wait for it...Fully Waterproof (except for the exterior pocket of course but the mesh itself is waterproof so won't absorb water).

    It is my belief that there aren't lashing straps on the front and rear of the pannier because the closure straps/buckles are located there. I wouldn't be eager to stitch any added molle lashing points as that would likely affect the waterproofing. However, there are ways to utilize the straps and lashing points to add the desired bottle holster or pocket -- especially with the added Base Pack. I have size 13 boots so I can't really put anything to the front of the pannier anyway. Ultimately, it comes down to how you organize the gear. With the Base Packs on the Monsoons, I don't put anything in the pannier that I need access to during the day. All of that stuff goes in the Base Pack and/or tank bag. Which I think is the same intent the OP has with the BC35 - put the quick need stuff in beaver tail or exterior pockets (not waterproof;-) and leave the overnight stuff in the main pannier compartment. Sounds like similar ways to solve the same need.

    I don't intend to bash the Mosko Moto stuff as I think they make great, well thought out gear. I lust for their stuff but every time I'm in the market and do the analysis of cost and function, I rationalize that I'm just not OCD enough for the MM products. I'm drawn to the functional simplicity. Plus I fall on the cheap side of the equation....even with the added packs I'm into the Enduristan solution for considerably less than the BC35 + some unknown rack solution.

    Ultimately, there's not one right answer for everyone. Both solutions reviewed here are excellent quality and top level solutions in this product category. The Mototrek ones look interesting but I'm not eager to change out panniers on an 18 year old bike ;-0 -- oh, and I'm on the cheap side of the equation...
    #16
    Serbig and flamingm0e like this.
  17. Erreske

    Erreske n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4
    Location:
    Belgium
    @PaulBarton : you have any pictures with the Monsoons strapped to your GS ? I'm considering them too for my 1150GSA ....
    #17
  18. slink

    slink Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Oddometer:
    253
    Location:
    Estes Park, CO
    Great information comparing the Enduristan Monsoon and MM Backcountry panniers. Can anyone compare the Bumot Xtremadas to these?
    #18
  19. PaulBarton

    PaulBarton Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    2,504
    Location:
    Seattle
    Timely question...as FlamingOne inspired me to create a backing plate to allow them to mount to my Jesse Odyssey I rack so I had quick release. So I've just this week "completed" the effort. I now have backing plates on them with aluminum mounting brackets for my Jesse racks. However, here are a couple of pics from a trip last summer before this past weeks mods. I was more focusing on the signage in the pics but you can see the Monsoons mounted normally with a Tornado bag across the top. I have the Monsoon's strapped across the pillion seat area with the seat removed. I have a Hepco Becker cargo basket that installs in place of the seat. The straps route under that so they don't interfere with use of the basket (or pillion seat when it's installed). The Tornado bag is strapped to the basket so independent of the Monsoons.
    IMG_0628.JPG IMG_0646.JPG

    I didn't modify the bags for the backing plates so I can return them to factory condition. I'll try to get pics of them on the bike for you later.
    #19
    flamingm0e likes this.
  20. flamingm0e

    flamingm0e Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2017
    Oddometer:
    1,806
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Here are the quick release brackets I made for my Monsoon bags. IMG_20170502_071800.jpeg IMG_20170502_071840.jpeg IMG_20170430_180556.jpeg
    #20
    rbsride365 likes this.