Enduro Mountain Bike Racing

Discussion in 'Sports' started by mikem9, Aug 7, 2019.

  1. Askel

    Askel Perma-n00b

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    Da UP, eh.
    FAKE NEWS. That's not Iowa, I don't see a single Busch Light anywhere in the picture. :D
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  2. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    I’m actually registered for my first “enduro” style race this Saturday. It’s an enduro format in that the singltrack sections are all timed then you’re free to get to the next section by whatever means necessary. They all connect by public roads, greenways, etc... I’m pretty stoked if I can get my damn rear brake sorted on the Yeti.
    #22
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  3. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    Or a Casey's.
    #23
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  4. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    First Enduro-style event went well enough. I placed 5th and, considering the top 4 were all locals to the trails; I’d say that was a fine enough finishing place.

    Missed 3rd by 2-½ minutes overall which looks like it was from a cumulative shaving of seconds per stage. Local trail knowledge in a multistage event like this obviously yields huge dividends. Even though these are my closest trails... they’re still nearly an hour away by driving and not just out the back door like the top 4.

    We haven’t had measurable rain in over a month and a passing shower the night before the race was a huge improvement to trail conditions. Some of the bridges were damp enough to make me back off speed on approach, and I damn near took out the photographer when I hit the first one a little too hot. Slid straight across and dropped the front tire off the left edge right in front of him before I made it to the end.

    Holding my beer money as the 5th place prize.

    Watershed.jpg
    #24
  5. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    So what was your cumulative time and did you have to pedal uphill anywhere?
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  6. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    A tick over 3 hours for 34 miles and there was plenty of climbing... about 50' per mile.

    KOtW.PNG
    #26
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  7. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    So this was more like a CC race with "breaks". Yeah, very close to the current moto enduro format. Our "enduros" are usually just a short section of trail, mostly downhill. So maybe 5-10 minutes with an emphasis on speed and railing berms and jumpy stuff, but you do have to pedal up some.
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  8. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    I raced dirtbikes in the good old days,it was as cutthroat then as it ever has been. Winning is everything.
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  9. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    The crucial thing about Mt bikes,is they "seem" safer. But they will eat you for lunch SO quick if you push it just a slight bit too much. Ive sprained and tweaked body parts on dirtbikes,and broken bones in half on mt bikes.
    The almost complete lack of protective gear may matter some,as does the tinker toy suspension on mt bikes. Bicycle Suspension parts may look trick but once you've ridden a late model KTM 2 stroke...............
    #29
  10. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    Apples to oranges... MTB suspension, especially as advanced as has become in the last 5 years, is not under anywhere near the same loads and physics as a KTM 2 stroke. The only constant between those two is the size and weight of the rider. The power that we humans can put through the pedals is not even in the same galaxy as on a motorized enduro bike.

    Red Bull Rampage is quickly approaching; watch those guys to see how MTB suspension can handle serious loads and physics-defying landings.
    #30
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  11. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    It is apples to oranges for sure. Those guys at Rampage use as much body weighting etc as they do suspension,huge skill levels.And they are downhill bikes. All Im saying is an average pedal trailbike handles like a shopping cart compared to a good dirtbike,no comparison can be drawn between the two. The lack of a throttle is also a detriment. Mt bikes take huge finesse.
    #31
  12. Ridge

    Ridge Faster than farm equipment... Supporter

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    Body weighting, English, whatever you wish to call it is even more important in MTB riding/racing than on even a low cc dirt bike. The dirt bike can use throttle combined with bigger knobs on the, much wider, tires to overcome the weight disparity.

    Riding a MTB fast, any MTB requires bucket loads of confidence in your bike, gear, and the skills/experience to put it all together at speed. Situational awareness to look downtrail for the cleanest line while also cataloging everything in your periphery that's a potential threat, and constantly shifting your body weight to build/maintain momentum. That last bit is especially true for single speed riding... being able to maintain as much momentum from the downhill to offset at least some of the stress from the next climb is crucial.

    The rider of a MTB is a 100+ pound counterweight that is just as necessary, if not more so, to the bike's handling and composure than the steering input at the handlebars.
    #32
  13. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Oh Man,I watch all the big time Mt Bike events on you tube,some of the ballsiest,smoothest,quickest,athletes on the planet. The Rampage is just insane. Miss your line by 5" and the whole day can go very bad.
    #33
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  14. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    I have both a modern KTM and mtb full suspension with about 5" of travel at both ends. I know there are sections of tight twisty downhill trail, where I am faster on the mtb than dirt bike. Of course as soon as you turn around...that all changes.
    #34
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  15. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    My problem with my mtn bike suspension as compared to my dirt bikes, is not on big hits it’s on the small stuff.
    I just can’t get the Yeti to work on slower speed roots and rocks.
    I am already running more sag then recommended but can’t get the compliance I want.
    And if I go with more sag the bike feels out of balance at speed
    On the other hand I’m only using about 2/3’s of the stroke on big hits
    There’s no point in having a bike with170mm of travel f I don’t use either end of the stroke
    If my KTM acted like this I would know what to do this not so much.
    #35
  16. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    I'm no expert on setting up mtb suspension, but on a dirt bike, sometimes if you have too much sag, or too soft of springs, it lets you enter the midrange and you never get that first few inches of plush. Have tried slightly more air pressure and reducing your compression? Worth a try, if you already haven't. On my Trek, I'm running slightly more pressure than what's recommended.
    #36
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  17. NuckaMan

    NuckaMan Space Available

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    @stormdog

    Few of questions:
    What make/model suspension are you running?
    What are you looking for? Better small bump compliance (i.e. better action?) Is the bike to hard as it is now?
    Has it always been that way or progressively gotten worse....time for a rebuild?

    Without knowing too much details, but sounds like you may need to play with the air pressure/volume spacers and dial in your valving more.
    #37
  18. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    2whlrcr.. If this were my KTM that is exactly what I would try.
    I don’t have the bike with me at the moment, but from memory the forks are 36mm Fox by 170 mm on a 2018 Yeti SB5 LR
    I did a full tear down to remove excess grease and removed the one “biscuit”
    With no air the forks cycle smoothly.
    And while I am not a fast rider nor do I do any 4 foot drops, at nearly 200 pounds I would expect to push further through the stroke then I do.
    #38