Excess Electrical Capacity 2017 Husqvarna 701

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by CardiffKook, Feb 21, 2019.

  1. CardiffKook

    CardiffKook Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2017
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    San Diego
    Alternator is supposed to put out 300W.
    Electrical components listed in manual and draw:
    Headlight: 60/55 W
    Parking light: 5 W
    Turn signal: 10W (and not always on)

    All these are only 75W which would leave 225W available- which seems very high.

    Not listed are things like the fan, fuel injector, etc.

    Can anyone tell me what the watts are that are drawn by the bike during normal operation. What is the excess electrical capacity (eec.)

    Trying to figure out for heated gear.
    #1
  2. justlookin

    justlookin Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    708
    Location:
    Ohio
    My 17 , 701 will run my warm n safe heated gear. Top bottoms and gloves. Only other load mod that I have done is the Motominded Baja Designs headlight setup . Jacket liner is the 95 watt unit and the bottoms are chaps and may not be warm n safe products. Anyway I also have a Trail Tech Pro dash that has a voltmeter and bike gets ridden a lot-just got home with it tonight. Never had a starting problem and voltmeter is always around 14v while moving. I have seen it down in the high 12v when idling.
    #2
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  3. CardiffKook

    CardiffKook Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2017
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    San Diego
    Very helpful. Thanks.
    #3
  4. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2013
    Oddometer:
    6,897
    Location:
    Oaklandish
    300W is only at or above a certain engine speed, usually 2 to 3 times the RPMs at idle.

    Best thing to do would be to measure the amount of current being drawn across each fuse. Pull one fuse, insert an ammeter in place of the fuse, start the bike. Flip lights, blinkers, rev the engine, etc and monitor the current. Record the highest current displayed (in Amps) Repeat for each fuse.

    Then add up all the currents measured (in Amps) and multiply by 12V (nominal voltage). Subtract that number from your 300W and that is approximately how much power you have available.
    #4