Exploring California - Journey of a Noob

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by KennyBooBear, Jan 4, 2020.

  1. sealsam

    sealsam Sam...I am. Supporter

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    Good on you for making the meet-up!

    I've wanted to make that ride for quite a while, just a bit out of my range. Jesse runs a great rally in Utah every year, but you probably know that by now.

    Look forward to seeing your write up!
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  2. dano619

    dano619 Long timer Supporter

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    Looks like you are havin FUN!!
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  3. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Grass Valley
    I figured it was about time I got my lazy ass around to documenting my first (and second...) ride with the Flying Monkey Adventure Riders - I really try not to be suspenseful but it's just been a busy set of weeks.

    Through a couple of Facebook groups, I ended up in touch with Jesse Kimball (GeoMoto guy who runs FMAR) who welcomed me to join them on their hump day ride.

    Now up until this point, the very large majority of my off road experience was taken at my own pace, solo and when fatigued I'd pop out the ol' camp chair to take a leisurely breather while staring at scenery. One of the things that has intimidated me about riding with any sort of group is the simple fact that other people will rely on my ability to keep up - and frankly, I've been a bit concerned that I wouldn't be able to.

    Even so, I dove into the deep end (quite literally as you'll find out) and joined these gents figuring the weekly group ride couldn't be too gnarly given photos I had seen from the previous week's ride looked largely like graded forest roads. Boy I was wrong.

    As this was an "unofficial" ride, and the weather wasn't ideal, just a handful of people showed up.

    My first hint that this wouldn't be a doddle was the fact that everyone (the gent on a 1200GSA included) was on one form or another of knobbies whereas I was on a damn-near bald front MT60 and a decent Mitas E07 on the rear. The latter helped - the former not as much.

    After a short meet and great, we hit the road down 79S toward Anza. About 20 or so miles in, and after just enough turns for me to lose my bearings, we turned off onto a gravel road. By this point we had already ridden through some rain and could clearly see the snow level on the mountains ahead. Jesse explained briefly that we'd look out for one another, and that a couple of friends we met at the trail-head would actually be leading us up to the top of Red Mountain.

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    And so it began...

    As we charged up the mountain, I found rather quickly that I was fighting the front end from washing out constantly. The light albeit steady rain was slowly saturating the already soaked ground, making the top layer of red clay little more than a slimey paste. Pair this with my limited experience in mud, and brakes that were similar in consistency to the terrain we were riding on and it could be easily understood that I was having an "educational" time getting to the top.

    I stopped briefly at one point to throw my glove liners on, as the feeling in my finger-tips went from painfully cold to completely numb. The temperature had dropped to mid-30s paired with the windchill from riding and the rain that was falling so my digits were a bit cold. Still, I was able to keep up relatively well and with very few near-dumps.

    Along the way we even rode through a bit of snowfall.

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    I'm honestly not too sure how much time elapsed, but it seemed like not much later at all had us to the top of Red Mountain and celebrating reaching the summit through the rain, mud, snow, sleet and fog. Breathing a sigh of relief, I enjoyed a bit of conversation before it dawned on me we still had to go down.

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    Once we had wrapped up our break, the longest night on my bike to date began.

    The sun set on us quickly, and in short order we were riding on top of the same mushy substrate but now with an added centimeter of snow on top.

    Luckily we ended up below the snow line rather quickly - but by that time it was completely dark, my wet brakes were useless partly due to them being Himalayan brakes, and partly due to the front tire having about as much tread as a pair of women's heels.

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    Having fought my bike for the last hour and a half - I had reached a point of fatigue where I was now death gripping my bars (not the right thing to do, I know), and unable to stand on the pegs both from a lack of energy and fearing eating it while standing up would be harsher than sliding around while sitting on my bum. As one would expect, this staying seated and gripping my bars too tightly situation soon led to my first drop.

    We were picking our way down a narrow double-track section that was steep and rutted. Behind me was the 1200GSA, a KTM EXCF and Jesse on his trusty KLR.

    My front-end found it's way into the beginnings of one of these ruts and unable to stop, my momentum carried me forward into a motorcycle sized rut where the bike simply sloshed over.

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    The muck we were on at almost the exact same time also claimed the 1200GSA behind me. After getting up, ensuring everyone was good and righting the motorcycles, we carried on. But not before I binned my Himalayan a second time in pretty much the same damn spot - d'oh!

    It should be mentioned that the first of these two drops also broke off my right side hard case. I knew riding with them would be a hindrance but a big part of me wanted to see exactly how much abuse the harbor freight cases could take. That said, I do believe my higher speed incident at the end of last year back in Grass Valley stressed it making this sudden drop in the muck the straw that broke the HF Case's back. Jesse gave me a hand strapping it down to the back of my bike before we continued down the slip and slide.

    For the remaining hour and a half we pressed on - and I through various forms of confidence quickly met by death gripping fear when I would end up in a section of much with 0 control of my machine. Still, Jesse and the group ensured no man was left behind which was reassuring. I was undoubtedly the slowest of the group, along with my compatriot on the 1200GSA.

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    In every adventure or interesting story, there's a climax where the main character has a defining moment in who it is they are. Mine came a short while later when, through one of the main very deep pools of muddy water that had already filled my touring boots - I went over. With no one near me at the time, I flipped the kill switch and sat with the right side of my body completely submerged.

    For the first 10 seconds I continued to lay down cold, tired, and generally miserable. I recall my thoughts at the time being something to the effect of "Okay, &$%# this - I'm not longer having fun and I want to be home."

    After a good 10-15 second soak - I quickly changed my tune and thought something more along the lines of "I wanted to come on an adventure ride and here I am. If nothing else, I'm gonna have one hell of a story to tell."

    By the time I stood myself and the bike back up, Frank reached me on his EXCF and rode ahead to park his bike. He asked if I needed a hand and after hollering something regarding my being suctioned into the mud, I pulled my boots out and managed to saddle the bike back up without dropping it - fire it up and ride out of that pool of muck.

    Just as I did, the rest of the group caught up and I ironically have a photo of the next guy going in as I'm riding out of it.

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    It does a fairly good job of showing how deep it is. I can honestly say it almost entirely swallowed my front tire.

    It wasn't long after - maybe 20-30 minutes or so that we reached the end of the trails and found ourselves back on pavement. Jesse took a final photo of me, grinning ear to ear despite being soaked to the bone and cold. The photo says it all, especially since you can clearly tell which side I was laying down on haha

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    I suppose I should finish this off by saying what I learned from all of this, so here goes.

    Firstly - Equipment. Having the right equipment (tires, soft bags if any at all etc.) is huge to making your adventure a more pleasant one. The same can be said for your wearable equipment. A proper pair of MX Boots would have saved my feet from soaking, and a pair of gauntlets may have saved my arm and right side from the instant soaking they received, forcing me to get my ass out of the water a bit sooner.

    Secondly - Don't forget your training. There were so many moments where I ultimately let my fear of the inevitable get the best of me and instead of forcing myself back into position I'd give in and plop my ass on the saddle, holding on for dear life waiting for the wild ride to end. This led to my being much more fatigued than I already was, causing a repeating cycle and inevitably leading to my drops. There were so many other teachable moments too; Namely carrying momentum into large pools of mud/water, body position etc. etc. etc.

    Lastly, and probably most importantly in my case - bring an extra pair of gloves.:rofl

    At the end of the ride I asked Jesse where this trip fell on a scale of 1-10. He described it as a 9-10 given the conditions which allowed me to breath a sight of relief. He then went on to tell me I had been initiated. "One of us, one of us" I recall myself thinking at the time.

    I'm thrilled to be able to ride with such a fantastic bunch of people, and equally thrilled to have such a talented bunch of people to learn from. I can't wait for the next ride with them.

    Oh and I should plug Jesse here so - here's a video he tossed up from the night's ride.

  4. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Grass Valley
    The very next week I went on another ride with the FMAR group and I'm proud to say, I managed to not bin it.

    This trip didn't involved inclement weather or hugely varying temperatures, but the pace was a good bit higher leaving me with no time for photos. What it did involve however was some amazing double track trails, rock gardens, ruts, muddy washes and deep sand.

    Having never ridden in sand before myself apart from small patches of deep, dusty dry dirt in NorCal, this proved to be my biggest challenge. I put all I had learned to practice though and ended up having a blast cruising over the sand at speeds in the 35-40mph range. Anything faster simply felt like I was cheating death. At one point I admittedly bogged in some exceptionally deep sand and ended up riding the thrashing bull out of it in first gear.

    21 riders showed up for this trip and I was shocked to find that I was roughly middle of the pack in terms of pace and seeming ability. I was keeping up and passing guys on far more capable machines (DRZs, Huskie 701 etc) - which after last week's ego check definitely made me feel quite a bit better about how I had progressed over the last year. I even stopped to help a gent who had bogged his 790 Adventure get his beast out of said hole.

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    I also managed to flub up Rever - as I started tracking the ride about 10 miles in, but I'll toss the details here anyways.



    The one thing I can confidently say is that many lessons I learned the week prior were put to the test this week. I felt immensely more confident in my ability and remained a lot more headstrong -forcing myself to stay in position. I immediately noticed my doing things on the Himalayan I could never have come close to accomplishing before and I credit it entirely to riding with a group of very talented folks. Unfortunately this greater talent I exhibited also led to a slightly bent rim and a greatly deformed bash plate - but now I just get to upgrade the equipment on my bike, so it's a win win situation.

    I'd have to say I was more physically fatigued by this ride than the one prior, and I suspect it's because I spent the entirety of this one on my pegs. It was also a much more challenging set of trails that with the conditions of the week prior would have made impassable. I arrived home and at first my wife was convinced I had gone swimming again, but I had to reassure her that my soaked shirt was instead soaked in my own sweat.

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    A gent from this ride also recorded the route, so here's his footage. It'll give you an idea the sort of places you can take a Himalayan if you're determined enough.

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  5. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    248
    Location:
    Grass Valley
    And finally to get all caught up - this last Saturday I went on a loop down into the desert on the KTM.

    A few weeks back, a passing neighbor saw my bikes in the garage and commented on the KTM in particular in admiration. We spoke briefly and exchanged information as he stated he hadn't ridden his Street Triple R in some time.

    We texted a bit and finally formulated a plan. We would ride into Palm Desert and wing it from there.

    I got an early start, fueled the bike up and such and ensured it was ready to go. I figured the ride would be a cool one as it was in the low 60s and overcast, although the weather app implied we had a much more desirable setting awaiting us in the Colorado Desert.

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    We set off at 10:15am on Saturday morning quickly pavement pounding up to Cahuilla Casino where we gassed up. At this point the temperature had dropped into the 50s as we had been steadily draped in cloud cover. I had an extra layer I put on, but as I was wearing my Summer gloves, admittedly I was looking forward to breaking through the clouds into the desert.

    After fueling up we quickly made our way into the sun and began descending down into the flats of the Coachella Valley. We stopped briefly for photos and again at the lookout before making our way down for a quarantine char burger at The Habit.

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    We decided we would ride out to the Salton Sea and choose our route from there. This was admittedly the only part of the ride I could have done without. Schuyler felt the same way, as it was a lot of straight 80-85mph cruising and I personally much prefer 45-55mph twisties.

    Even so, we reached the Salton Sea and to my surprise it wasn't as smelly as everyone touts it to be. Perhaps due to recent rains? It honestly smelled no different than the ocean to us. We parked the bikes and walked out onto the sand which we quickly realize was actually made of barnacles. We were literally walking atop the skeletons of millions.

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    After a good 30 minutes or so killing time, we set off again to the intersection with the Borrego Salton Seaway where we fueled up and turned toward Borrego Springs. This section was by far the best of the journey and a seeming hidden gem in the area.

    The terrain and general scenery was absolutely incredible and had I been alone, I'd have likely stopped every 3 minutes to take more photos. As I had a friend with, I kept the stops to a minimum but finally decided to pull off the side of the road as my eagerness to take in the scenery was too great.

    Words really don't do the area justice, and I will definitely be back soon to document this area and explore it in much greater detail.

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    We completed the journey down the Seaway and stopped one last time in Borrego Springs for a quick stretch before heading home. I asked my friend if he was interested in riding up East Grade to the top of Palomar on the way back, but on his smaller and more cramped Street Triple, fatigue was setting in for him in a big way so we opted to shoot straight back.

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    I found a small Cholla that I really wanted to dig up and take home to the wife but I decided better of it.

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    He later commented to say that he had never "ridden into the clouds" before that ride, and that it was really awesome to do first hand. The temperature once we rode up and out of Borrego Springs dropped a good 25 degrees as we made our way back to Pauma Valley and ultimately, to Temecula.

    By the end of it, we had ridden some 212 impromptu miles, and each of them were more than worth it.
  6. GonzoMD

    GonzoMD Adventurer

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    Temecula CA
    Good stuff . Keep it coming, it`s motivation for myself and many others I'm sure.
    KennyBooBear likes this.
  7. dano619

    dano619 Long timer Supporter

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    Thanks!!
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  8. Wierdrider

    Wierdrider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Oddometer:
    895
    Location:
    Spring Valley, Ca.
    Most excellent!!!
    I read the first page, and the last page, way to jump into the Moto world :clap
    I’ll go back when I get a chance and read 2-5. Then I’ll be following along.
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  9. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    248
    Location:
    Grass Valley
    Appreciate you lot.

    And sorry in advance Wierdrider - I'm long winded both in person and in text haha

    I've definitely fallen head over heels in love with being on two wheels and the Himalayan despite the abuse I've put it through, has been immensely reliable.

    On the topic of the Himalayan, I've taken the last 2 rides with the FMAR group to re-evaluate my adventure setup. She's got some new things in the works that I'll list below.

    Firstly, as the OE bash plate is in tatters, I've picked up a much nicer, beefier steel skid. I've made some adjustment and need to cut a few more notches to get it to fit perfectly with my crash bars but it's close and I'm stoked to have it.

    I've also gone ahead and fitted Tusk DSports - 90/90r21 up front and a 130/90r17 in the rear. The rear clears fine, even with the rear tire pushed as far forward as it'll go.

    As the hard cases are not ideal for tougher tracks - I've gone ahead and ordered a set of the Tusk Pilot soft bags.

    Additionally, due to a now slightly bent front wheel, I'm going to be ordering a set of Warp 9 allow rims and using my OE hubs to lace them up.

    Lastly, I'm re-evaluating the suspension a bit and have concluded that it's time to redo the front fork. HyperPro's front springs should do the trick so that'll be coming down the line soon. On the suspension topic, I may also be swapping in the Hyperpro rear spring/shock setup before too long, but for now the rear end has been reliable. The front is just far too soft and I realize after one too many episodes of it bottoming out causing the bike to jar all over the place, it is definitely a needed upgrade so that's taking priority.

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    Knobby!

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    Out with the old....

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    Mocked up...

    Ideally I'd like to keep the Himalayan as my primary adventure/dual-sport rig as there's something to be said about going places on a machine that is often thought of as incapable. A few improvements should make it that much more capable.
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  10. Wierdrider

    Wierdrider Been here awhile

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    I had heard about the FMonkeys a while back and found the thread right after your first ride with them. I saw that picture of you all muddy, and thought to myself, I’m not sure I wanna ever ride with that group. Lol
    I’m not quite as adventurous, especially in the weather you/ they ride in. One day I might build up enough courage to join a hump day ride? Time will tell!
    The Himalayan is taking on a real off-road beast, nicely done. Keep up those long winded stories,
    Ride on,
    Jim
    Here’s a few favorites of my "adventure ride"
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  11. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Grass Valley
    Yea, honestly if I knew how tough these last two rides would have been, I'd have been too apprehensive and likely wouldn't have gone. That said, I'm glad I did and it only makes me want to come back the next week. That aside, I'm hoping this week's ride is a bit more tame haha

    I think I kind of underestimated my ability to ride these sorts of trails at a pace that keeps everyone around me happy - and although the first week I felt as though I struggled, the next week helped me rebuild the confidence I lost and then some.

    Also have some cool stuff down the line later this year that I'm really stoked to be involved in - so I need to get my audio/video recording setup reliable that way I can document these things without the need to stop and take photos.

    The VStrom is a super capable machine and I suspect you'd do just fine on a lot of these. You definitely should join in, especially now that the weather will effectively be the same for the next 6-8 months, because California.
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  12. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Grass Valley
    Any of you residing in Southern California will know, it was hotter than Satan's ass crack this weekend.

    As a result, I decided to spend some time escaping the mid-upper 90 degree temperatures. I got up Saturday morning and had a wild hair in my rear that I'd go check out a Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 down in San Diego. It was a multi-purpose trip though, as while I was very keen on riding one I was equally keen on riding along the coast and enjoying a 15-20 degree difference in temperature.

    I raced down to Triumph of San Diego and met up with the gents there for my 10:30am appointment, and the long and short of the Enfield is that I'm now seriously contemplating having a third bike. My impulsiveness initially had me thinking "Well, I could sell the SMT and get the Enfield" but then I rode the SMT for a collective 320+ miles this weekend and realize that's an impossibility.

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    The little Int 650 is a riot. Genuinely easy to ride - and as others have stated, it feels lighter than it is.

    The rear suspension needed to be cranked up a bit me thinks as when I let go of the bars at any speed above 35-40, the front end would get the wobblies but otherwise a very smooth, easy riding machine. It's quite a sweet exhaust note to boot. Brakes were a little mushy but nothing that couldn't be solved with sintered pads, but overall it was a delightful little machine that brought me back to June of last year when I started riding my little 250. Just a really fun, classy machine to saddle up and cruise on.

    After the test ride and briefly talking number, I opted to sit on the idea and think about it and started my ride back North. I opted to cruise the coast the whole way, and all I can say is wow. Cutting through the La Jolla hills is one of the best things I've ever done, as the views are incredible and the crisp, coastal air was divine. I lost track of time and ended up not stopping but once to enjoy the crashing waves down near Encinitas. I took a single photo (or so I thought) but it either didn't save or I wasn't as accurate on my phone's shutter button as I thought I was. Continuing on down toward Carlsbad, I made a pit stop at one of the many fruit stands we have strewn across California (one of the perks of living out here), stocked up on goodies and then made the rest of the trip home.

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    Oh and those strawberries were so far beyond amazing after riding back into 95 degree weather.



    The next morning I got a text from my buddy with the Street Triple, and by 11:20am we were on the road with the intent to head East and then loop all the way around Palomar Mountain, taking East Grade Road up and South Grade back down into Pauma Valley. We stopped briefly at Garage.79 to take some photos and after a short text exchange with his friend later, we decided to double back down to Menifee to pick up another rider.

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    Along the way, we cut through Sage Road toward Hemet and were treated to one of the best roads in the area. It's largely without any traffic (not even bikes) and despite a few spots of sand, it made for an incredibly fun road to both cruise as well as open the bikes up on. As we crested a hill a few miles in, we were rewarded with a panoramic view of the San Bernardino Mountains in all of their snow capped glory.

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    17 miles of Sage Road, a bizarre car accident where a Celica had it's rear end caved in by a Mercedes, and a long stretch of windy 4 lane highway later - we were back in the sweat-box. We met up with our friend on his modified Harley Sportster 883 and quickly made our way up 74 with the goal of reaching Idylwild.

    What I didn't know is what an absolute marvel of twisted pavement we'd find going up the San Jacinto Mountains - the latter stretch especially. It starts off nice enough, but the final couple miles are a back and forth of steeply banked, long sweeping, well paved turns that beg for you to lean in harder and faster. Once at the top I looked in my rear view and realized my friends were nowhere to be found. I slowed to take in the views from the top and - no joke - about a solid minute later my friend on his Triple catches up with our friend on the Sportster another 20-30 seconds behind.

    My friend on his Triple would later comment how as we got toward the top, his leg was starting to give out. This among many other reasons is where it dawned on me that getting rid of the SMT for another machine would be plainly silly - as it is a scalpel in a world of shovels.

    We stopped for water and beers at the junction of 74 and 243, and headed further up toward Idylwild to find a quiet, wooded area to park and talk life and general bullshit for the next couple of hours over a cold brew.

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    About 2 and a half hours into our bullshit session, we realized the time and opted to head back. At the junction of 74 and 243 our friend took off West down 74 toward Hemet as we sped off South toward 79. A very short while later we were gifted the best scene of the day.

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    After that, we made short work of the rest of our respective journeys. We went different directions at 79 as I was headed home toward Temecula and he toward the in-laws in Pauma Valley. Over the course of the day we rode about 175 miles through vastly changing terrain and scenery and managed to escape from the mid-upper 90s down to mid 70s. It's amazing what a few thousand foot of altitude does for the soul.

    Now I've got to finish getting the Himalayan prepped for Wednesday afternoon! See y'all soon.
  13. Wierdrider

    Wierdrider Been here awhile

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    Oddometer:
    895
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    Spring Valley, Ca.
    Sounds like a perfect day! If you haven’t ever ridden Mesa Grande, make sure you do that when you’re down that way. It’s a jewel of a road. It comes down to the 76 by the Hideout bar, and comes back into 79 close to Santa Ysabel.
  14. sealsam

    sealsam Sam...I am. Supporter

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    seal beach, ca.
    While in SY, make sure you grab a piece of heaven, the Apple Mountain Berry Crumb,

    [​IMG]


    Wonderful thread KBB!

    Glad you're getting the most out of your new discoveries.
  15. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer Supporter

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    Orange County, CA
    i gotta circle back and read thru this whole thread tonite.

    looks like you're having a lot of fun.
  16. pitbull

    pitbull Long timer

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    Aug 24, 2004
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    6,506
    I'm enjoying your great report and great pictures and as a fellow SMT rider (2010) I echo your sentiments of it "dawned on me that getting rid of the SMT for another machine would be plainly silly - as it is a scalpel in a world of shovels."

    I originally bought the SMT 2 years ago as a stop gap until I saved up a few more bucks for a used Multistrada 1200s, but I'm loving the SMT so much I can't see me moving on to a multi anytime soon.
    KennyBooBear likes this.
  17. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

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    Location:
    San Diego
    Just found your thread (thanks @Wierdrider ). GREAT ride last night. Didn't get to talk with you cause you know . . . 16 riders. Looking forward to looping back through and reading your whole thread here.
    Kelly - 2014 green GSA
  18. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    248
    Location:
    Grass Valley
    Thanks gents! I'll make Santa Ysabel a priority next time I ride through the area. (Likely to be this weekend.)

    Yea the more I ride it the more I realize it's worth the ridiculous amount of work to check the valves :rofl

    Thanks for dropping in Kelly.

    I was super bummed yesterday - when I pulled in at the gas station I almost ate it. It's my first time on knobbies and while that's easy enough to get used to, what made it insurmountable for me was the inability to feel anything in my legs.

    I got these new MX boots and it was my first attempt at riding with them. After realizing I couldn't shift, couldn't feel the rear brake or pivot as I'm accustomed to doing and frankly, couldn't feel the motorcycle under me - it started to slowly sink in that continuing the ride was a bad idea.

    Once we got on dirt I became rather certain I was going to crash in spectacular fashion so I opted to turn back. The 35 miles home sucked as I was dying to be out there. I kept kicking myself for not bringing my worn in touring boots that don't provide as much protection, but at least I can ride the damn bike!

    In any case, I'll definitely be out next week with y'all but will be in my old boots until I can figure out how to use/wear these new ones.

    Cheers.
    sealsam, Zubb and GutsyGibbon like this.
  19. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2002
    Oddometer:
    3,024
    Location:
    San Diego
    :muutt
    But but but. . . Isn’t a spectacular crash part of the whole kabal? I know it was only my first monkey ride but I feel cheated. :dirtdog:muutt
    KennyBooBear likes this.
  20. KennyBooBear

    KennyBooBear Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    248
    Location:
    Grass Valley
    Haha yea, sorry about that.

    I don't mind dumping the bike - hell I've done it enough times in the last year.

    It's more the feeling totally out of control because you suddenly don't have feet that I draw the line :lol3

    Don't worry though, you'll be able to witness me dump the Himalayan next week, I'm quite sure lol
    Wierdrider and Zubb like this.