F700GS as newbie bike?

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by spurcap, Feb 7, 2020.

  1. Stubbs604

    Stubbs604 Adventurer

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    A bike I considered was a new CB500X. The problem for you is that it wouldn't save that much weight or height compared to the F7. I think you should just get the F7 with a lowered seat if you think its necessary. You'll be fine...and if it's not, don't blame me. :D
    #41
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  2. Tommy2Turnt

    Tommy2Turnt n00b

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    I passed the MSF class last year with some friends and bought a 2013 used F700 that already had a lot of farkles added to it. I don’t regret my decision one bit.

    The f700 has a very smooth power delivery that is pretty hard to get in trouble with if you decide to wring the throttle. Mine had engine guard protectors already installed which is nice because I dropped it twice in parking lots in my first couple months of riding. I wasn’t use to the weight at first and leaned to much into real low speed parking lot turns. I’m about 5’11 210 pounds and don’t have an issue with getting my feet on the ground. You’ll probably be more comfortable on a low seat or lowered suspension version. I’ve taken it on a few gravel roads and plan on doing the MABRD this summer. It’s nice to have the freedom to get off the blacktop if you’re so inclined.

    I would caution you from getting a sub 500 bike. My friends bought Yamaha mt07s after taking the MSF class and we are all in agreement that we are really happy we didn’t get anything with less power. The mt07 is definitely much snappier at low speeds than the f700. I don’t think I would be as comfortable on those.
    #42
  3. morfic

    morfic Been here awhile

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    Snappier i read? Think I add this:

    Best upgrade to the F700GS is the 16T front sprocket, snappier and less chance to stall, so more newb friendly.
    #43
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  4. shuswap1

    shuswap1 Long timer

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    Think you're right about that morfic, the stalling tendency (when starting from a stop) would be a concern with a new (er) rider. I know it caught me a few times, but I have a tendency to use low RPMs and figure that contributed. Wife revs the crap out of hers and never-ever stalls it!!
    #44
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  5. zero war

    zero war Zee

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    I tried that for a year but there is a downside to it. There is more vibration when you’re above 70mph. It was real cool that at sprint from a traffic light even an R9T couldn’t keep up with my F700gs from 0-50mph

    But I feel the better solution is going back to 17T and adding a rekluse clutch. I can’t stop smiling with my rekluse. Especially when I realize I’m gonna hit traffic.
    #45
  6. Tigershark48

    Tigershark48 My other BMW is a Roadster.

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    I’m looking forward to trying the 16t this spring. My rural pleasure riding is mostly 60 mph or less, so vibes shouldn’t be a problem.
    #46
  7. morfic

    morfic Been here awhile

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    Don’t know about vibrations, not an issue on this bike.
    If you have em at 70 with a 16T you’d have them around 75 with a 17T?

    Just picked up new contacts at lunch and 70@~4200 in 6th is smooth, but then again so are 75 through 85.

    If 4200 is unbearable on one sample I’d want that fixed as these bikes can be smooooth.
    #47
  8. Winger77

    Winger77 Just caught the bug

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    Although a little late to this thread, I’m strongly in the 700 camp for 1st bike. I was brand new last summer, with many similar goals and thoughts as Spurcap... and my 700 has been perfect for me. I absolutely rode within myself, and didn’t even venture a mile of highway travel for some 2000 miles or so. Now with 5000 miles of experience (I know, relatively zero,) I feel like my 700 will be my perfect ride for years to come. I can manage the highway speeds, even if reluctantly, while totally thrilled around town and on afternoon jaunts in the country. I’ve nearly dropped the bike only once, and the nasty arm strain from keeping the bike upright that day has taught me a valuable lesson... one I hope not to forget soon.

    Finally, I’m sure that I would have really enjoyed the cb500x that I was also considering, but I’m equally certain I would have very quickly come to believe that I should have gotten the 700 instead. I’m absolutely thrilled that I went for it, good luck with whichever bike you go with. Ride Safe!
    #48
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  9. shuswap1

    shuswap1 Long timer

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    The f700 has grown on me as the miles accumulate, it really does surprisingly well in most types of riding. Having ridden close to 50 years it is the best handling bike I’ve come across.
    #49
  10. spurcap

    spurcap Adventurer

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    Thanks all. Looking at a couple this weekend and will see how it goes. I sat on a couple with standard seat/suspension and can almost flat foot (I can feel both my feet hovering over the ground with the balls touching + can lean slightly to one side and flat foot solidly w/ the other ball of my foot on the ground). However, my 30.5" inseam + new(ish) rider ability probably would benefit from the Touratech or similar 30mm lowering but the kit isn't that much and can reverse it if I find ground clearance becomes more of an issue than low speed stability after awhile. I sat on a very nice one with lowered suspension and it definitely feels more comfortable flat footing with a slight knee bend.
    #50
  11. Winger77

    Winger77 Just caught the bug

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    I’m 5’8” 30” inseam. I was lucky to find a factory lowered bike... Exactly the right set up for me, but I’m not rolling over forest or backcountry obstacles. One thing to remember, some aftermarket comfort seats will add a wee bit of height... if you choose to upgrade. The only issue I had with my 700 was the seat... 90 minutes was about my limit. I swapped it out for a Sargent, glad I did!
    #51
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  12. spurcap

    spurcap Adventurer

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    Thanks for all the feedback in here. Been very helpful. Going to check out a 2013 F7 w/10k miles. While I am very competent on cars (done frame up builds, engine builds, all my own maintenance), I am new to bikes. Therefore would likely want to pay a BMW specialist mechanic that knows the common problems and what to look for 1 hour labor as insurance. But, unfortunately, the bike is 3 hours from such a shop, the owner doesn't want to ride 3 hours in 10 degree weather with salt on the roads (makes sense), he doesn't have a trailer, and neither of us would feel comfortable with me taking his bike 3 hours in my trailer. So question then is - would you buy without an inspection? I am capable of checking tire tread, brake wear, giving a good look over, checking that everything works, etc. but in reality I am not concerned that I may need to do some maintenance I didn't think about but rather about significant issues that I miss due to lack of experience with these bikes (think cracked frame, engine sounds indicating a bent valve/worn bearings, etc.) One hand I think it's too much of a risk to take, the other I wonder what could really be wrong with a bike with 10k miles that otherwise appears to run fine. Interested to other opinions.
    #52
  13. nvklr

    nvklr Been here awhile

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    I’m with the “what could be wrong after only 10,000miles”. If it looks good, sounds and runs good, it’s probably good. Obviously signs of damage such as mismatched paint, bent handlebars, etc would be warning signs. I’ve heard rear wheel bearings tend to fail early but mine are over 25k miles and doing fine. Asked how often the oil has been changed, service interval according to BMW would suggest only one has been done with that mileage, any extra would be a plus any less would be potentially bad.
    #53
  14. spurcap

    spurcap Adventurer

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    Yeah - especially for BMW, on older cars, sometimes having a mechanic make a list of upcoming/past due maintenance items is well worth $100-200 as it relates to price negotiation and the piece of mind of a 2nd set of eyes to look at the car is a bonus. Getting a BMW dealer to show prices for high labor/low part cost jobs is a good thing for someone that does their own work -- a used e46 I bought with a slight valve cover leak rings a bell. The seller really saw no opportunity but to drop price when they said the car needed something that would cost $1500 right away, but I did it over a weekend for $100 or $200 in parts. But in the case of an extra 6 hours of driving or incurring the cost of the dealership picking up the bike into the equation significant effects the cost/benefit. On the other hand it seems like a lot of money to put in blind faith - would definitely be kicking myself if I end up buying a bike with a cracked frame or some other catastrophic issue
    #54
  15. Winger77

    Winger77 Just caught the bug

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    Look him in the eye, use your intuition. Is he an inmate? Does he live in a nice area, or do you feel he has an agenda? My advice is to use your best judgement on site, and realize that life is an ongoing risk... but most folks are not dishonest to begin with. Perhaps I'm ignorant, but the guy that buys the premium brand to begin with, is usually a guy that favors quality and perhaps integrity. If it were a $200,000 yacht you were looking at, I'd highly recommend a pro... but a $5k or $6k bike... I agree with NVKLR. Good luck!
    #55
  16. spurcap

    spurcap Adventurer

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    To be honest, my concern is more about a problem the seller is unaware of than him hiding something.
    #56
  17. Winger77

    Winger77 Just caught the bug

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    Valid point, same reason I get an annual physical.
    #57
  18. shuswap1

    shuswap1 Long timer

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    Take a flashlight and use it to take a focused and careful look all around, without interruption.
    Is the seller the original owner?
    Got anybody with a keen eye to go with?
    You'll know within a few minutes if the bike is a good bet. Not too many issues with these bikes anyhow.
    Last bike I viewed for a friend; after 5 min of listening to the engine and eyeballing it carefully I told him the bike has one flaw, just one, a screw has been replaced and doesn't match the opposite side. The bike was that clean and show-room perfect.
    #58
  19. Fred Hustead

    Fred Hustead n00b Supporter

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    Hi spur cap I'm Fred from Riverside Calif. Very good info has been given to you. Go with new technology with the F700GS. I have the one you need and you will not have to pay a penny to add
    on all the essential dirt/street parts for it. I have the 2014 with 5,730 miles. It is set up with $8066.00 of extras. The top value kelley blue book is $6500. plus. The value of my GS is $14,500.00
    I'm asking $9,500. for it. Don' t be floored, I added $3,000 of parts to it to make it 100 % dirt ready. It has $5,000. of extras on it when I bought it. Which included Excel Woody wire wheels
    to handle adventure riding in the dirt and smoother ride on road $2,500 plus $500 KTM hub = $3000.00 of wheels. Engine and side panel crash bars, transmission full guard. 9 other important
    parts. My list of 19 parts and just serviced $300. I'm 69 have ridden since 18, raced for Malcom Smith, have had BMW F650 Funduro, BMW1150 GS, K1200RS and have the BMW HP2 monster enduro.
    I had wrist surgery and low back injury so I dropped to F700GS so I could still ride. I'm 5-8 32 inch inseam and 185 and flat foot on it you will have no problem with mc . Please call me 951-772-0646.
    It's an easy mc to ride in the dirt and street. PLUS go BMW for the camaraderie, hook up with local BMW dealer, RayHyde, Border Rides, GS Giants many things to join. Other mc do not have this.
    There are super BMW training courses for dirt and street. If interested I will personally send you pics of add ons and list with prices and other items I have that you can purchase such
    as tank bag, rear bag, clear water lites, .... that will complete the mc at top quality and top fit to mc as I have over 49 years of experience with what to add to a mc to make it ride better
    and look its best. Today is Saturday Feb 22, 2020 @ 6:00 pm California time about 3 hours behind you in NJ. Should you buy a new mc, you must count on adding at least $4000. to it to make
    it right with all the extra equipment you will need. Please call me home line 951-772-0646 to discuss. I just joined up again with Adventure and did not get a log on for my picture. So call me.
    #59
  20. spurcap

    spurcap Adventurer

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    Thanks for offer but ended up buying one yesterday already.
    #60
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