Fire!!

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by opskbert, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

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    OK folks I nees some help here. I had a small fire under the gas tank on my '04 GS. The wires from the fuel gauge burned and started the vent hoses on fire. Has any of you had this problem before? Before I put a new Petrol Gauge Flange on my bike, I would love some input as to what possibly started this mess.

    Thanks
    Kirk
    #1
  2. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

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    Sorry, I can't add pics. My laptop is too slow. I will add some tomorrow if I can.

    Attached Files:

    #2
  3. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

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    Whew.....:clap
    #3
  4. Hotspice

    Hotspice Satellites not acquired

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    :eek1 Not exactly the place you want a fire to begin.

    I haven't seen or heard of anyone having an issue like that before. Was anything ever done to the bike in that area that would have possibly frayed the wires or caused them to be routed incorrectly?
    #4
  5. ghostrider1964

    ghostrider1964 Edumacated Red Neck

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    My tank is on the workbench as we speak...it started spraying fuel on my leg...this ismy second tank to get a leak at the the fuel pump flange, another inmate local to me had same issue... mine was smoking but did not flame or I would have lost the bike:deal...I am wondering if ethanol is messing with it somehow...did yours leak also or just short out?
    #5
  6. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    First time I have seen or heard of..............very scary.
    I wonder why F6 fuel pump fuse (10A) did not protect the circuit.
    Please report further findings.
    Could the wires have chafed on the top of the motor somewhere?
    The only + wire is the fuel pump feed, the rest reference ground.
    #6
  7. vintagerider

    vintagerider Long timer

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    Ethanol or fuel additives not compatible with R11xx inside wiring and electrical bulkhead fittings. I have just seen a pump assembly (purportedly under 20 k total miles) made in 1998. This one had severe deterioration to virtually every single wire on the inside of the tank. The insulation was sluffing off everywhere inside. Frankly amazed that it had not already shorted and caught fire.

    Possible solution to leaking electrical bulk head fittings on oilhead pump plates:

    When you pull your pump plate you will notice that on all GS pump plates except 93-94 there are two electrical bulkhead fittings. A known failure is for the larger bulkhead to begin leaking. Note that it is secured with a grab ring. I theorize that this leak may be repaired by doing the following:
    Unsolder the pump wires. Cut the lock ring off. Pull out the bulkhead fitting. Replace the seal ring. re-install. Here is the tricky part. You will need a new grip ring. These things are found on Quest brand poly butylene plumbing systems. Perhaps the grip ring from a Quest fitting will be of the correct diameter?

    PRINT out the following instructions and use these in conjunction with your service manual or with ADVr show threads. I believe there are some details here that will help oilhead owners do a more satisfactory tank service:

    Preventative maintenance for 11xx owners:
    I have said this before. Drain and clean your tank at least once every two years. Don't know how? It is really quite easy. Do not try to siphon out the fuel from the filler neck. . Do not rely on fuel storage additives. Drain and sore your tank dry with the pump plate off of the tank. For pictures refer to the many show threads on this site. If you can follow simple directions, then the written directions below will get you there w/o damage/stress to tank or living entities. It really is not difficult to do this. Few tools are required. No high torque wrenching is required. It is not absolutely necessary to withdraw the last two gallons from the tank to service a fuel filter or a pump assembly, however it is highly recommended that you do so in order to properly flush the tank. Once the fuel is removed along with the pump plate and filler neck then you can reach inside and wipe out the RS front tank lobe. To clean the other side you can use warm soapy water followed by a clear water rinse. If you need to re-assemble fast, then your final rinse can be with rubbing alcohol to rid the crevices of water. Alternatively, air dry or inject warm air from a hair dryer for a few hours. However you clean and dry, use the method that is easiest on the tank liner which is to avoid harsh chemicals, high pressure air, or 400°F heat guns.

    !! Cautions!!
    -work in well ventilated area only, outside is preferred
    - never set your tank on a bench or another object to gravity drain because it is likely to crash to the floor as the center of gravity changes during draining.
    - beware of ignition sources such as water heaters and electrical sparks
    - wear goggles and have clear water in case you splash gasoline in your eyes.
    - do not smoke while working on the fuel system

    Why drain and flush at all?
    BMW shops will not do this for you. Water is heavier than fuel. It sinks to the bottom of the tank. By removing all of the fuel every two years or so, you can remove any bits of tank liner and crud from the front lobes. Storing the mc with a dry tank grately extends the life of the tank and the liner. The fuel distributor and injectors can be blown clean and stored dry or with Techrolene, Stoddard solvent or Seafoam. Whether you remove the tank or not you can pull off the injector caps and snap a small portable 12 V air compressor on the fuel spider/ distributor inlet Then operate the pump. If your compressor has a pressure gauge it should read about 45 psi. The fuel will be blown out of the fuel distributor and regulator. Store the mc with a dry fuel distributor. You can also use a syringe to fill a little Techron or stoddard solvent, re-attach your tire pump and the injectors and crank the engine to open the injectors so that solvent can flow in to the injectors.

    method A:
    Run the fuel down until the low fuel light comes. ON 11xx GS, all years:
    1. Remove the single tank fastening bolt Rear RS.
    2. Remove the RS plastic trim cover.
    3. Unplug the tank electrical connector from the frame.

    !! note !! The tank connector has a catch release. Use a small flat blade screw driver to release the catch and separate the two connector halves. The connector is stubborn to separate, especially if it has not come apart for a wile. Work each side a bit at a time. Have patience and you will not break the connector. After several uses the connector will be much easier to separate. You can use dielectric grease on the pins and sliding area. The bike side connector appears to be fixed to the frame. Actually, it can be rotated on the frame and it will release from a square frame hole.

    4. Unplug the two small vent lines form the BMW male x male connector on the right side - just follow the lines down from the tank to locate the plastic vent hose connectors which are tied to the frame.

    5. If you have QD's on the large fuel feed line and large fuel return unplug them.

    !! Caution !! Never yank or twist on the rubber fuel hose where it connects to the hard shiny black nylon fuel distributor locatednear the air box! Instead, use a razor or sharp blade to slice off your rubber fuel line at this transition point. The fuel distributor is made of nylon. It becomes brittle after time. Treat it gently! The rubber fuel hose is much easier to replace .

    If no Quick Disconnects then you have to disconnect from the BMW fuel spider/distributor (hard black nylon lines leading in to the air box on the RS). This is the only tricky part because you do not want to yank on the nylon or tweak it- it will break or bent. It is better to simply cut the old fuel lines with a razor to remove them. They probably need to be replaced anyway. If no qd's or if you still have plastic QD's be sure to also clamp the fuel return line to prevent fuel from spilling out. Best to remove the tank outside in case you spill fuel. If working inside be aware that fuel vapor is heavier than air. The fumes will ignite from any ignition source such as a water heater or electrical spark.

    6. Check again- the fuel return line has been clamped and four rubber lines from the tank have been released from the mc. The nylon QD, tank side, fuel return line may break and release fuel so be sure to clamp the line.

    7. maneuver the tank lines lines and electrical connector so they will not hang up on the frame when pulling the tank.

    8. At this point there will probably be only 2 gallons left in the tank. Have a safe place, rubber mat or blanket to set the tank down !! on the floor!! Do not set the tank where fluid slosh may cause the tank to fall off a bench and crash to the floor.

    9. Lay the tank on it's right side on the floor away from any ignition sources

    10. Apply PB blaster, WD-40 ect to the tank studs and let it sit. This saves the pump plate retaining studs from breaking off in the next step . If you have an original 1994-96 BMW resin tank then you have bolts and not studs. No PB Blaster is required. Go have lunch and let the PB Blaster do it's job if the studs look rusty.

    11. Loosen the pump plate and locate the two skinny rubber lines. Do not assault the BMW retaining clamps - these are re-usable. They are spring loaded and can be popped open with a small flat blade screw driver. usually they have yellow plastic insulation on the inside. Do not cut these re-usable clamps or the vent lines. Release each vent line from the pump plate. Actually one is your combination tank vent/overflow and the other is a water drain from the filler neck.

    12. Take your time and gently rotate the pump plate assembly until it can be withdrawn from the tank. Did you forget to release both vent lines from the inside of pump plate? Alternatively you can also begin at the filler cap and release them from the filler neck instead. Get the picture? Two small vent lines connect the filler neck to the pump plate. You have to release from one place or another.

    13. The two gallons that remained in the tank are now removed with a turkey baster, a siphon , or just tipping the tank over a bucket.

    Method B, Power draining a full tank using the internal fuel pump:
    note: it is very helpful to carry the jumper described below in your tool kit. It can be used to by-pass defective pump relay and/or bike wire harness to get you home.

    If you begin with a full tank you will need a five gallon portable gas can or a an auto to receive your pumped out fuel, a length of 5/16" fuel hose, a QD that matches the one on your fuel pump feed line and a simple electrical jumper that you make up from an old lamp cord. The jumper has a BMW male accessory plug on one end and , ideally male pins pins crimped on to the end of the wire. If you have no pins then you can stuff the bare wires in to the tank side female socket and jam them in there with nails. Wrap with tape-- you do not want the wire to pop out and spark while you are pumping nor short out and pop a fuse under the seat.

    Pump Plate connections:
    The heavy green wire is the pump 12-14 vdc battery + .
    The heavy brown is the pump battery ground wire.
    By connecting power hear you are powering the motor directly from the battery. It will run continuously as long as you provide battery power here.
    Of course your Accessory socket is fused , so check it's fuse if you can't spin the pump. Make sure that the jumper wire which you are using is long enough to reach the BMW accessory outlet on the LS. The other end of the jumper should be firmly seated in the female socket of the pump plate. Use a nail and tape to secure. You do not want a spark here while you are pumping fuel. Obviously, if your jumper wire shorts you will be popping a fuse under the seat, so make good connections.

    caution!! In the next step you will be activating the fuel pump. You MUST be working in a well ventilated area, preferably out doors.

    Connect a length of hose to extend the pump outlet to your fuel collection point, a portable tank or your car's fuel tank. Secure the hose with a rag so that the fuel pressure will not cause the hose to fly out of the receiving tank. It will come out in a strong flow but won't be as bad as a garden hose flopping around on the ground.

    Now that you have rigged up your collection point and double checked ventilation, you are ready to plug your jumper in to the BMW accessory port. In a a well ventilated setting, plug in the jumper to begin pumping. When you hear a squeal from the pump and the flow is no longer steady, unplug the pump immediately.

    You are now at the same point as Method A , above, with two gallons remaining in the tank. As above, withdraw the fuel pump assembly and remove the last bit of fuel by lifting the tank off

    Care of fuel pump assembly:
    While the assembly is out of the tank it is best to remove the fuel filter right away so that you can and pop off the fuel float arm. refer to your manual or photo threads for pictures. This is easy to do.

    !! caution !! Note that the plastic fuel sender is probably brittle. It has two end limit stops that limit the float arm travel. It is very easy to break off the end stops with a fuel float arm that is flopping around.

    Once the fuel filter, then the float and arm are lifted off, the assembly is more manageable. The contact slider of the sender will now slide down making it easy to clean the sender pad. Also, the wiper points can now be easily cleaned

    !! caution !! the wiper point assembly is attached to the fuel sender with a small soldered bare spring wire. It is fairly durable but try not to break this wire. It sits in a groove in the fuel sender plastic body. It can pop out of the groove for cleaning. Be sure it is properly replaced in the groove upon re-assembly.

    The fuel sender wiper points can be cleaned with electrical contact cleaner and or rubbed with clean card board. Do not "dress them" with a file The fuel sender board can be cleaned with a CLEAN pencil eraser.

    Re-Tension the wiper points:
    Re- tension the fuel sender points after cleaning by gently bending them outward. Place the wiper back over on the board and rotate. If everything is clean and adjusted, then you will feel a nice smooth resistance as you glide the wiper over the board. You will feel that the added tension now lets you feel the points gliding over individual clean sender board wires. Take careful note of the smaller, inner point contact as well as the larger more obvious wiper. The handling of the wiper should always be gentle. If care is not taken then the smaller wiper point will be come tweaked and not ride squarely on the fuel sender board.

    Refer to "Wisdom" on this site for photos and instructions on how to adjust the float arm tension. This is accomplished by gently bending the metal tab on the fuel pump assembly , the one with the hole in it that receives the the tip of the fuel sender arm. You may choose to skip this step.

    !! Remember!! the fuel filter MUST be removed to remove the fuel float arm. Do not re-install a new fuel filter without first re-installing the fuel float arm!

    - Clean out the vent port and the water drain port on the pump plate using a stiff wire and solvent. This is very important! A plugged vent can cause engine damage, pump damage and tank implosion damage from suction inside the tank. You know this problem severe if when filling , you hear a whoosh from vacuum in the tank! Never neglect your tank service to the point that it is no longer venting (breathing) and you have vacuum in the tank!!!

    - If you can feel bumps in the sheet metal at the pump plate flange mount holes then you will need to flatten them out. Put a socket under the concave side and tap flat with a peen hammer. This damage occurred because someone previously applied too much torque to the flange mounting bolts. The problem and the fix is just like sheet metal rocker covers on an auto.

    - Clean off the old gunk where the o-ring seals on the tank flange. Do not sand or use aggressive abrasive or you will remove the cadmium plating from the pump plate and it will later rust.

    Inspection of wiring and fuel hoses:
    Be prepared to replace the short straight piece of fuel line connecting the fuel filter to the pump plate. You MUST use SAE J30R12 rated fuel line inside of the tank. R9 or regular auto parts stuff will get you home in an emergency, but replace it with R12 as soon as you can.

    - Never replace any inside rubber tubes with anything other than SAE J30R12 fuel injection tube rated for full time immersion in fuel.

    - Old hard internal hoses cause low fuel pressure. Check the factory clamps. They are probably loose. Buy the correct J30R12 rated replacement bits

    - makeshift substitutes for the rubber U: They don't work. Do not risk damage to your engine and fuel pump by skimping on the the rubber U. You may get by with just replacing the fuel clamps, even on a hardened U. be aware that this is a critical component. Any damage here= low fuel pressure and poor engine performance. If its old and hard, then shell out for the EXPENSIVE BMW rubber fuel U.

    - Take your time when fitting new fuel clamps . If you are replacing with screw types, then the position of the clamp is crucial. If a screw clamp is improperly installed then it will interfere with the re-seating of the fuel pump plate back on the tank. Do not try to replace the BMW spring clamps for the vent lines with screw clamps. In an emergency, use high grade narrow electrical ties to secure the vent lines (two ties per port) or wire. Did you remember to clean the vent line ports on the pump plate?

    - Discard the old hardened fuel lines and vent lines on the outside of the tank. Use regular 5/16" fuel injection line here. It should NOT be the SAE J30R12 on the outside, just ordinary fuel injection line. The vent lines carry no pressure so just vapor line is fine. Check out your local Marine parts retailer for very nice, high grade fuel line. Sierra silver line is extra thick walled and a good choice if doing the external fuel filter mod.

    Checking the fuel pump:
    BMW fuel pumps may last up to 15 years / 100k miles ... or not. If you plan on going on tour, and your pump,is original, is it not worth the peace of mind to replace the old tired fuel pump? My research came up with a low cost Bosch replacement. It requires only minor talent to fit to the pump plate. Check out Crackhead's photo thread installing my suggested Bosch replacement. The cost is under $100.


    How to remove the suction/inlet pump screen:
    Note the position on the pump relative to the metal exit tube of the fuel return pipe on the pump plate. The new filter screen will need to line up with this pipe outlet when re-installing.

    The oem pump filter screen is a very tight frition fit on the inlet of the pump. Use a large blade screw driver to pry it off the pump inlet port.

    The bare minimum pump inspection requires that you remove the pump inlet filter (suction screen) and use a small flat blade screw driver to gently push the armature by the impeller fins. The armature should rotate smoothly. The field magnet will "grab" the armature as it is rotated. No fins must be broken or missing!.

    !! caution !! failure to inspect the pump inlet impeller blades means a high probability of being stranded down the road!!

    If the suction screen was split then suspect that there is gunk in the motor or even in the injectors. IMO do not mess around by trying to clean the filter screen. Solvent will destroy it. Just buy a new one. The cotton ones are very inexpensive.

    Servicing the filler neck / tank vent assembly:
    Around 1999 BMW improved the tank vent/spill presenter. When the filler neck is removed from the tank, the vent/spill presenter can be serviced. The early style is a black oval plastic piece. Remove this piece from the metal vent pipe attached to the filler neck. Use a combination of solvent, compressed air and stiff wire to clean the metal spiral vent tube.

    !! caution !! failure to clean the vent circuit in the filler neck will lead to tank vacuum, pump failure, tank implosion and /or engine damage from lean operation

    Inspect the sealing area of the filler neck where it seats against the locking lid. You are looking for a tiny water drain hole that is probably obscured by corrosion or lint. The purpose of this hole is to drain rain water away from the filler neck opening. failure to keep this drain clear will result in the rusting out of the filler neck. Like the pump plate, the filler neck is cadmium plated. Try not to rub off the plating while cleaning.

    Reassembly:

    I believe that this is well covered elsewhere on this site. Locate the flat spot on the edge of the pump plate. flange. When installed to the tank this spot should line up to the face the front tank mounts. The large diameter nipple port on the plate which is forward facing is the pump fuel pressure outlet. The rear one is the fuel return. When properly assembled, you should be able to blow-with your breathe only!- in to the tank vent terminus. You will hear your breathe escaping from the internal tank vent/liquid over-flow. If you do not, then correct the vent obstruction prior to operation the motorcycle.

    !! Caution !! never operate any 11xxGS unless you can locate the tank vent terminus on the frame, and blow in to it with the filler lid open, with your breathe only, to verify that the vent circuit is un-obstructed. Failure to do so can cause vacuum in the tank and engine damage. !! warning!! do not introduce compressed air in to the vent line at any time. If the vent circuit is plugged first look for a crimped line. If the lines are not crimped then the the filler vent must be lifted out of the tank and cleaned. The blockage may also be at the pump plate ports in which case the pump plate should be removed.

    It's nice to have a large viton o-ring to replace the Butyl-N o-ring. If you find yourself in the need to get in to the tank on the road , then the Viton ring will not expand upon dis assembly. If either ing did expand, then leave it in the sun to shrink back down prior to re-assembly. Use a dot of adhesive on the big o-ring to keep it in the tank groove. It must be installed clean and dry. Do not use sealants or teflon tape. Care must be taken to insure that none of your new hose clamps is interfering with full seating of the flange against the tank. Only seat the flange -very gently- with the nuts on the studs.

    !! Caution !! When reinstalling the flange nuts on the tank studs use only a nut driver between two fingers . Gradually and evenly draw up the the nuts so as to evenly seat the clean o-ring in its groove. NEVER use force on these nuts. ONLY compress the o-ring just enough to seat it in the tank groove. Looking sideways , you should still see the side of the o-ring between the tank and the pump plate flange.

    When all is assembled fill the tank with two gallons of fuel and set it on the floor over-night. Next morning check for leaks. Usually leaks will show up in a few hours. They may be from i) improper o ring seating or, ii) tank electrical bulkhead failure. Installing a leaking tank will cause paint damage, usually to the front telelever arm. If the large tank electrical bulkhead is at fault, then run the tank only half full to reduce leakage.
    #7
  8. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    22
    Location:
    Mapleton, UT.
    Thanks for all the input. I will hit each person with the info I have. First a little background. I have owned Shamika for 2 1/2 years. Bought her with 15000 miles and now have just over 30000. I have had no problems at all. Maintenence has been done by myaself and my local shop. I do the fluid changes they do the sync and valves ect. I have had the tank off two times since I have owner her. I have not seen any damage to the wires before.

    Hotspice: Nothing has been modified nor has there ever been anything done to the fuel pump or flange that I know of.

    Ghostrider: No fuel leak ever detected. There is no sign under the tank or on the frame that there was a leak. I have not had any electrical problems until now.

    GS Addict: The wires burnt are the ones going to the fuel guage. I have not checked but if it is fuse protected I am sure it is blown since the fire was out by the time I got the tank off.

    Vintage Rider: I have not used any additives in my fuel. I run Chevron Gas that has Techron but nothing else. The inside wiring is not damaged. It looks perfect. Thanks for the info on draining the tank. That will now be part of the routine for winter storage.

    Thanks to all for the help!!!:D
    #8
  9. tagesk

    tagesk Tuscan rider

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    3,230
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    Tuscany, Italy
    Sir,
    May I add (a link to) this fine and detailed description to the GSpot FAQ?

    [TaSK]
    #9
  10. vintagerider

    vintagerider Long timer

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    Nov 20, 2005
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    Santa Cruz, CA
    Certainly. And anyone is free to quote and annotate with photos. I've got a great photo of the "low mileage" pump plate which has all of the inside insulation sluffing off. This ought to be a recall imo. I don't expect parts to last for ever but I do not expect them to signal that they are at the service endpoint by catching fire either.
    #10
  11. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Or the wire melted open and the fire stopped.........
    Please provide pictures of the inside of the sender plate.
    I would investigate the cause very thoroughly so that it does not happen again when you commision the new part.
    Was the fuel low when it happened? ie: the low level switch was closed to ground...
    Look at the sender board very carefully for any signs of heating etc.
    To melt wire like that there had to be a fault to B+ somewhere in the system.
    Possible things to check are the Fuel level damping relay and that F4 is 4 amps and not something higher.
    #11
    rg sw wa. likes this.
  12. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

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    Tank was full! I will check fuses tonight. Do not where sender board is to check for signs of heating.

    Thanks for your help here!!

    Attached Files:

    #12
  13. vintagerider

    vintagerider Long timer

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    The sender board is the white board with two half moon sliver windings. GS Addict suggests that you look carefully for shorts. The wires are zip tied to the pump plate. Cut the zip tie and look for broken insulation there.

    Any place that current from the heavy green wire supplying power to the pump shorted over to the the fuel sender wires is suspect. I do not believe that any short at the fuel sender board, on it's own, could carry enough amps to the sender wires which caught fire. I could be wrong about that though.

    Another possibility , and I'm guessing here, is that something went wrong in the fuel damping unit (relay box) which sent the high current back to the fuel sending board. I have never heard of this happening. You definitely need to figure out why this happened before installing the replacement fuel pump plate.

    Inspect the power leads from the pump motor back to the pump bulkhead fitting on the plate and make sure that there is no fault in those wires.
    #13
  14. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

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    I checked all fuses last night with nothing blown. I also checked wiring from the fuel plate back to the plug. I cannot see anything there that would make me think it shorted out. Thev heavy green wire looked good. It should be noted that the small brown wire where it plugs in, has heat damage also.

    Attached Files:

    #14
  15. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    That wire obviously carried a fault current to the heavy brown (12- or ground).
    You must trace back and see where it contacted +12v

    Addendum: I suspect that your battery + post touched the tank! The tank "floats" above ground on rubber mounts. The only wire that bonds it to ground is the small brown wire on the fuel pump plate which then connects to the large brown at the connector end. The reason the little brown wire is not burnt on the inside is that it was cooled by the gasoline.
    Check your fuel tank in the area of the + post and see if you have any evidence of arcing or sparking.
    #15
  16. lemieuxmc

    lemieuxmc Banned

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    I can see the discussion starting already.

    "You wouldn't have that problem on an Airhead!"

    "This wasn't an EFI problem per se, but rather an insulation problem. Airheads have insulated wiring that can fail too!"

    Blah, Blah, Blah...

    But seriously, I'm glad you are OK.

    Really now, Is there such a thing as a small fire around your gas tank?

    Scared the crap outta me when the EFI hose sprung a leak and sprayed gas all over the Guzzi.
    #16
  17. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool Supporter

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    Don't even start that one! Airheads never had electrical problems. :evil
    #17
  18. vintagerider

    vintagerider Long timer

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    Good diagnostics by GS Addict. The early 93-94 oilheads had only a single electrical bulkhead. It was the same small bulked that persisted on the later oilheads but it became dedicated for the fuel sender wiring and no longer carried the pump power which was moved to the larger bulkhead. The early design required a separate grounding wire to pump plate flange bolt. Perhaps it is a good idea to retrofit the early style ground wire to the 95- up pump plates and fuse the sender ground. These 93-94 flange ground wires are fitted with electrical quick disconnects.
    #18
  19. BMWRich

    BMWRich Away from the Libtards....

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    Not a GS but a good size BBQ goin' on here!!!

    [​IMG]
    #19
  20. opskbert

    opskbert Bert

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    Mapleton, UT.
    This is the second time I have heard this scenario of the tank getting a positive charge. After my buddy suggested this I checked the tank and can find no evidence of that, but it is possible that was my problem. I have checked the wiring on the GS and can find no evidence of any shorts or even any hot wires. The damage is localized to the wiring on the fuel pump flange only. As much as I hate thinking that I am to blame for almost burning up my bike, I kind of hope that is it. I am worried that I can't fnind any other problem or any evidence of what could have caused this other than a positive charge to the tank. If anyone can think of anything else to check, please share. I appreciate all the help and great advise I have received. I am out of town now until next Saturday. I will order new flange and repair will begin after I get back home. I will keep this thread updated as I make my repairs. Thanks again for all your expert advise!!!:freaky
    #20