First trip on first bike.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by codeDirtyToMe, Oct 23, 2018.

?

Will I survive?

Poll closed Oct 29, 2018.
  1. Maybe.

    83.8%
  2. Nope.

    16.2%
  1. Plawa

    Plawa ¿ʞO ǝʞᴉq ʎɯ sI

    Joined:
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    or Moto Skiveez..
    #41
  2. Gham

    Gham What's for lunch? Supporter

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    Auburn Hills,MI.

    :lol3 Completely understand
    #42
  3. lifeofliberty

    lifeofliberty If you're bored, you're not living

    Joined:
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    I'm also a BIG DR650 fan. I like the color on that '19 model! This fine machine will run nearly forever if you do basic routine maintenance. It's a bike that has taken many around the world. There's a gigantic base of DR fans here and on a few other dedicated sites to keep you informed and in good company.

    If I may - I do suggest you get some decent footwear. Meaning real riding boots, as soon as you can. This site can help you with that (info, sources, etc.) Most of us can attest to the sheer joy of just jumping on our scoots with whatever we happen to have or own and getting away with it (no injuries) even for years and years, but there's also a large number of us that can attest to wishing we'd been smarter about this particular point (on EVERY ride).

    If you're going to ride the TAT - get in lots of practice beforehand, always gently increasing your 'challenge'. Find more experienced riders to learn from, and/or take courses and improve your skills. This is also the single most important thing 'newish' riders should do.

    You can also pick up a lot of good pointers from YouTube believe it or not, then go out and practice. I like Adventure OZ / Cross Training Enduro Skills vids for this (https://advrider.com/f/threads/dirt-riding-enduro-cross-training-skills.972472/), but there are many more available.
    #43
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  4. thechief86

    thechief86 jack of all daniels

    Joined:
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    RE: Boots- I have worn work boots and combat boots most of my riding career, but in the last year I bought some Forma Adventure Low boots, new off Ebay, sans box for $170, and they have improved my offroad confidence tenfold.
    Beyond that, when things got extra hairy, they have protected my feet and ankles, and prevented serious injury.
    I got squirrelly in a sandy spot in the woods when getting extra rowdy on my DR350 dirt model, and managed to run over my own foot without actually crashing, and the rear axle nut bashed my ankle quite hard. I got a decent little bruise, but without quality foot/ankle protection, I would have broken my leg and/or foot, and would have had a VERY hard time getting back out of the woods and to a hospital, as I was hours from civilization, and had trucked my bike to the area from home, which was in the opposite direction of the nearest town with a hospital. We take serious risks, on road or off, and these are multiplied when alone and in sparsley populated areas.
    Good boots are money well spent. But I wouldn't be afraid to ride between now and collecting all the proper gear, just make good decisions and try to minimize risk as best you can afford, until you can do better.
    Anyway, I highly recommend the Forma Adventure boots. They look great, and are very comfortable, waterproof, and if you needed to hike several miles in the event of a crash or breakdown in the middle of nowhere, they won't kill your feet. I got the brown low ones, my buddy got the black high ones, and he says they are quite hot in the summer. YMMV
    #44
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  5. Essbee

    Essbee Adventurer

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    I can only re-itterate the above two opinions on footwear. Don't skimp! Those shortie " 50/50" boots? Nah! NOT for offroading in my books.
    #45
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  6. HPPants

    HPPants Adventurer

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    Sep 1, 2011
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    Welcome, sir to the club! We've been expecting you.

    It's impossible for non riders to get it. They simply refuse to accept the fact that on the other side of their cages' windshield lies an entirely different world. One with smells and sounds. One that exist is true 3D, not to be confused with LTE (LOL). One with an unlimited ceiling, both literally and figuratively. One that reeks of adventure and discovery and even peace on every single journey - from the ones that are 5 miles to the ones that are 5000 miles. I hope you learn to see the world through your helmet visor and share it with us.

    You just brought me back a memory from a few decades and a few hundred thousand miles ago. Thanks for blowing the cobwebs off of my coconut. Ride on, man.
    #46
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  7. Bigbore4

    Bigbore4 Long timer

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    I wish I had done a RR when I rode my fist bike home. Helps preserve the memories.

    oh wait, that was 1977, pre interwebz, and I was 19.

    Welcome to the riding fraternity and enjoy your new ride. I like the color!
    #47
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  8. DresserCat

    DresserCat Adventurer

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    Oct 27, 2014
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    Surprised someone hadn't warned you about one of the significant hazards of getting a new bike. You often forget that you have a girlfriend, wife or SO, lol.
    #48
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  9. pk1200

    pk1200 n00b

    Joined:
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    A few years ago I rode my adventure bike to Alaska. I stayed at a hostel in Fairbanks. One afternoon a couple , husband and wife, rode in on DR650s from Prudhoe Bay.
    These two had flown into Boston from Australia. They bought two DR 650s and upgraded them with larger gas tanks, better windshields that’s some serious panniers.
    From Boston they rode to California, through Central America, and all the way down to Ushuaia. Heading back north, they both had accidents that involved broken bones which held them up for several weeks.
    I was very privileged to experience their joy at finishing their trip.
    #49
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  10. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    I checked them out, but I'm skeptical about them simply because my bike is plenty tall enough as it currently is. I really don't want to add any more height to the seat. Regardless, I appreciate the suggestion.
    #50
  11. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    Will do. I'll be heading to the local shop for boots this weekend. As far as pushing my limits, I'm just waiting on the break-in mileage and service before I do anything other than back and forth to work. Also, I have a quite a lot of mountain bike experience, so I'm very interested to see if any of that crosses over.
    #51
  12. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    Awesome. I just checked them out. I wouldn't be surprised if I end up getting these.
    #52
    thechief86 likes this.
  13. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    My pleasure. Literally.
    #53
  14. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    A guy I work with today asked if it was 125cc. His eyes just about popped out of his head when I said it was 650. He then told me that back in his day (1970s) bikes like that were maybe 250cc at most. I'm curious to know what your first bike was.
    #54
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  15. drbuzzard

    drbuzzard Been here awhile

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    just found your post this morning, congrats on all of the " firsts " you did!! be glad your adventure didn't include rain, I picked up a used bike Saturday and had three hours of riding in the rain to get it home, I would have been ok with it not raining. keep on riding learning and enjoying your new DR
    #55
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  16. Bigbore4

    Bigbore4 Long timer

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    1977 Yamaha XS 650 D, Maroon. Never should of sold it. Alas, back in the day didn't have the dough to maintain a fleet.
    Sturgis, 1978
    Sturgis 78.jpg
    #56
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  17. Edoz

    Edoz Adventurer

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    You're in the same boat I am. I am a lifelong cyclist, and I bought my first motorcycle a month ago. A lot of things do carry over, even some things I never thought of. The biggest thing for me to adjust to is the fact that the bike weighs twice what I do.
    If you've done much road riding or commuting, that sixth sense that tells you "that dude's not gonna stop" or "this truck is coming over into my lane"
    is already developed. Reading road conditions is mostly the same, everything just comes up faster.
    You also should have a good feel for negotiating loose or rough corners, it's just a case of getting used to the different weight and speed.

    Anyway, those are just my observations from my first 5 weeks on a motorcycle. They are likely the ravings of some guy who doesn't know what he's talking about;)
    #57
    GooseYArd likes this.
  18. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    Yep, I think my mountain bike is around 27 pounds. The difference in weight is staggering, sometimes literally.

    In the Spring and Summer I usually ride my mountain bike to work on street tires (Maxxis Hookworms) and I do my actual mountain biking on the weekends. As such, I feel pretty confident off-road and on. Funny thing is, even though I wreck off-road all the time and haven't had an accident on road, I'm far more worried about being around traffic than I am about bombing down a hill with jagged rocks and trees everywhere. I'll probably have similar experiences and feelings about being on the motorcycle off-road.

    It's cool to hear about experiences from another cyclist. What kind of motorcycle did you get?
    #58
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  19. codeDirtyToMe

    codeDirtyToMe Adventurer

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    Wow! That is cool as hell. I love this stuff. I suspect this picture is one your prized possessions. Thank you for sharing it. I just did a YouTube search of Sturgis 1978 to help experience the image a little better. It must have been an amazing time. I often feel like I was born too late.
    #59
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  20. Edoz

    Edoz Adventurer

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    That's because trees don't really pull out in front of you on the trail, no matter what we claim after the crash;)
    I got a CB500X.
    #60