FJ_Kevin's CR250, 390 & 430 Vintage Husqvarna Restoration Extravaganza!

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by FJ_Kevin, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. MiamiMotorcyclist

    MiamiMotorcyclist used to be -MiamiUly

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    Nice bikes.
    I had an 81 IT175 when I was 14 and loved that thing. Then moved up to an 82 husky xc250. Great bike.
  2. wfopete

    wfopete Suffer Fools; Gladly!

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    Kevin,

    You wouldn't happen to have more of those KTM parts taking up space; would you? I have a 1980 KTM 250 in need of bit and pieces.
  3. Chestnuthillguitars

    Chestnuthillguitars Been here awhile

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    Kevin, I guess brilliant minds think alike! I did the 1981 KTM swing arm swap on one of my 1981 Maico 490s. I am basically done and will post the complete details of the swap with picf on here. I have a question for you though. Would you have a long version of this arm available, as I want to do the swap on my other Maico 490 race bike. Here is a pic of my bike mid transformation. Notice the 1998 complete RM250 front end on the bike, I did that about 5 years ago. I also put a reed valve top end on it this winter IMG_5716.JPG . Should be all back together by next week.
    PistonPants, AlpinaE24 and 996DL like this.
  4. Chestnuthillguitars

    Chestnuthillguitars Been here awhile

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    IMG_6021.JPG
    My 1981 Maico 490 with the 81 KTM alloy arm swap, basically done, just waiting for the Maico Only reed pipe to get here!
    spokester and woods wizard like this.
  5. Scootern29

    Scootern29 Long timer

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    I've seen pics of your Maico here and there. Nice job on that bike.
  6. Mobil1

    Mobil1 Long timer

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    Nice. I had an '81 former factory bike.
  7. Chestnuthillguitars

    Chestnuthillguitars Been here awhile

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    Cool, what were the factory mods? Any of what I have seen or learned seemed to be basically stock but blueprinted, with Ohlins, and some with an Alloy swingarm, sometimes by Thor, like what is on my unrestored all original, down to the tires and plastics 81 250 shown below. So what was "factory" about your bike? I would love to know what was the difference over stock, thanks, Rob
    IMG_6312.JPG
  8. Mobil1

    Mobil1 Long timer

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    Motor wise I don't recall the details I was told , but I bought it from a former factory rider in maybe '83 . Durk or Dominic something. He was sponsored on 250's and wanted to move up to open class. They wanted him to stay on the 250 and wouldn't give him a 490 unless he paid for it , so he did. It did have Ohlins shocks , an aluminum swingarm , which looked very similar to stock , but in aluminum , and a 1 off pipe nobody could ever identify , that I remember. I sold it in '87. Parts were probably no easier to get then , than now. It was a monster , if you dared to kick it , because the first kick of the day was almost a guaranteed kickback. :lol3 It'd throttle up in every gear. Last I heard , the guy I sold it to sold it again and the new owner snapped off the kick start shaft trying to kick it without the compression release. :fpalm
  9. Chestnuthillguitars

    Chestnuthillguitars Been here awhile

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  10. Mobil1

    Mobil1 Long timer

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    First start of the day you were better off push starting it , because usually when it kicked back you'd be hurting for awhile. :lol3 I didn't know snapping the kick start shaft was common. Luckily the only thing I ever snapped on it was a foot peg. Rode off a 6 or 7 foot drop and the left foot peg broke and bent straight down. I thought I broke my ankle when my foot hit the ground.:dunno
  11. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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    Congratulations on that super trick Maico. Very, very nice! I like the KTM arm, looks like you polished it up, looks great. I also like the magnum tank on there.

    Do you have all the build photos on your bike? I am sure lots of folks would love to see you start a build thread with everything you've done. There are getting to be some very cool dirt bike threads here on ADVR, I think you should start one on your bike. Any racing action you could add would be icing on the cake! BTW, I raced a 400 magnum in 1980/81... great bike, we did all kind of things to it!

    Thanks for posting your machine, enjoyed seeing it!
    Kevin
  12. Chestnuthillguitars

    Chestnuthillguitars Been here awhile

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    Hi Kevin, yeah I took pics of the complete process of the swingarm swap from start to finish, and plan to do a thread on it what I get a chance (sorry to hijack yours!!!). I did not take pics though for my front end swap that I did about 6 years ago. Anyway, all I did with the KTM swing arm is clean off the factory (I guess?) silver paint with 0000 steel wool and lacquer thinner. I made sure to go with the grain (lengthwise) with the steel wool as to not scratch the arm. It came out beautiful. The basic mods I had to do to the arm to make it fit the bike, was to weld a 1 7/8" aluminum tube in the cross brace for airbox drain clearance when the suspension would be compressed. The Maico also uses a 14mm swingarm pivot. I did not want to drill out a valuable frame and the rear engine mount so I used the Maico bushimgs with new bearings in the arm to accept the Maico bushing. I had to machine the bores deeper in the KTM arm to do this , as the new bearings are 24mm wide compared top the stock 16mm wide KTM bearing (not a bad thing actually as its a much more stout bearing. Because I used the stock Maico bushings, I did not need to make any extra spacers . I needed to make one spacer for the small side of the rear hub, and a bracket to mount the chain guide and that was about it. The fromt top chain guide that protects the arm is made from left over rail slides cutoffs (hyfax) from my Skidoo sled, (its the same material as used in modern chain guides) IMG_5785.JPG Here is a pic before I mounted the arm.
  13. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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    Freshening up the 1980 CR250

    I have set aside the CR390 project for awhile as I was busy with other things. What this means exactly is that I have moved it into another garage... and you know, out of sight, out of mind...

    On the other hand, I have been passing by this CR250 almost every day. Recall that this is a running bike that I was riding as late as last summer. Oh sure, I still needed to take care of a few things on it but with the weather warming up, why not go for the low hanging fruit and get this baby all tuned up for the coming season?

    Recall that this is the ebay special picked up a couple of years ago with a stuck motor as a result of sitting in a basement for 20 or 30years. It actually came loose pretty easily, and fortunately, the top end cleaned up well, requiring only a light hone. Here it is on the lift early last summer.

    [​IMG]

    The goal at this point was just to get it ride-able to see if I would like it before investing too much time and $$$. I gave it new air filter, cleaned the carb, lubed and adjusted the cables and brakes. The original Ohlins needed a rebuild but I was fortunate to find a very nice rebuilt set that was correct for this bike for a reasonable $300 (shipped) on ebay.

    The pipe was in pretty good shape other than being a little rusty. A little time with the wire wheel fixed that but unfortunately the silencer was toast.

    I've had good luck with the FMF turbo core universal silencers and almost went for another one of those but a search of the dirt bike parts stash turned up a pretty nice old school aluminum DG silencer. I think this came with some Yamaha parts I bought at a swap meet a few years back. Anyway, I do like to repurpose good used parts when possible, especially if they are true to the period. Plus its less wasteful and clears the shop out a little bit :deal.

    Of course it was not a straight bolt on, as always some modification was required :*sip*.

    First, it was apparent that the original mounting tab on the DG silencer would just about line up with the seat bolt hole if the input into the silencer was shortened. No before picture but here is a photo showing the silencer with the now shorted input. You can also see that a section of aluminum tubing has been tig welded over the original and shorted inlet pipe. The intent was to allow the silencer to slip over the end of the Husky pipe. A couple of slots would be added to the new inlet to allow attachment using a hose clamp.

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    This "coupling" section came from another bent up silencer (I save everything!) and had an input diameter that matches a yz465 pipe. It turns out that I also had a section of steel pipe in a diameter that exactly matches the YZ diameter.

    The required section of YZ diameter steel pipe happened to slip right over the outlet on the Husky pipe as shown in the following photo taken just before welding.

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    I also wanted a tab to mount the left number plate like this,

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    You can see that I am using a hex stand off from my Yamaha parts box. This standoff will keep the number plate slightly off the silencer.

    Here the tab is being clamped and positioned for welding,

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    Another "standoff" is needed to mount the top of the number plate. Once again a cutoff from a Yamaha hex mounting bolt is used. This time it is welded to the seat mounting bolt. The hex side of the bolt is threaded to accept the 6mm number plate screw.

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    Here is a test fit of the silencer mounted to the bike,

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    And next is the number plate mounted to the silencer. I used a heat gun to shape the number plate so it would roll over the top of the silencer. Tucking the top in like this makes it less likely to catch with your leg while doing a knack knack (whatever that is?). I think maybe I still have some shaping to do.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the Husqvarna of Hakan Carlqvist and where I got the idea to roll the plate.

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    This one is a little different.

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    Chuck Suns factory Husky has a flat plate.

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    Here is a view from last summers test ride. Both plates are at the same level (not always the case on Huskys!).
    The right plate has been cut out to follow the seat contour

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    Once again this was done to replicate the factory Husky setup.

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    So my plan was to keep this bike fairly original, worn paint and all. But as I pulled more parts off to work on it became apparent just how worn the frame paint was.

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    More to come!
    juicy flawless and 996DL like this.
  14. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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    Well, the more disassembly I did, the more I convinced myself that the best course of action was just to strip the whole thing down and repaint the frame.
    It's actually a very solid bike and worth the repaint effort to keep the surface rust and corrosion from really taking hold. Here it is after removing the swing arm and engine.


    [​IMG]


    I used chemical stripper to remover the paint. What the remover left behind was taken off using a wire brush on my small electric grinder.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Overall, the frame is in excellent shape. No cracks or dings found anywhere. You can see that I still have some work to do to remove paint in some of the tight spots where the wire wheel couldn't quite get into and I also still have to tackle the swing arm.

    [​IMG]

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    So good progress on the prep work but I have not yet decided whether to use paint or to send it off to the powder coater. The PC guy did a nice job on the YZ490 frame last year and it was quite reasonable at $140. On the other hand, paint would be better from an originality point of view although I am not sure it matters much on an old dirt bike like this.


    More to come...
    Scootern29 likes this.
  15. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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    So while I ponder the tradeoffs between paint and powder coat why not enjoy these Husky hop up tips from MXA circa 1980...

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  16. MiamiMotorcyclist

    MiamiMotorcyclist used to be -MiamiUly

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    Very cool thread.

    Is that a Saab Sonett on the lift? Didn't go back and re-check the thread but don't remember discussing that or seeing any full pics.
    Not sure I've seen a sonett IRL but it was my favorite matchbox car for ages as a kid.
  17. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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    Yes, it is a 1974 Saab Sonett III. I have had it for about 10 years. Have 2 of the earlier body style Sonett V4's also. They have german v4 Ford engines and are front wheel drive. The bodies are made of fiberglass with the earlier cars coming in at ~1700 lbs. I had a red one while in college in the early '80s ... haha, would tell people it was a Ferrari :lol3

    I suppose it cant do too much harm to post a couple of Swedish cars photos in a Swedish dirt bike thread. This is taken at Summit Point WV.

    [​IMG]

    About 5 years ago in Maryland
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    You can see it's a tight fit.

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    A 1969 in blue, has the early body style, wrap around rear window & flip up nose. It will be awhile before I get to this one.

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    This red one is a 1968 and is my 1st sonett (picture is ~1981). Can't see it here but there is a "TEAM Husqvarna" & "I'd rather be racing" decal in rear window.
    I rebuilt the motor, the transaxle and painted it all in my dad's backyard shop.

    [​IMG]

    Again, ~1981 but with fake Porsche hubcaps, funny picture but hey, same girl as above!

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    The factory assembly line,

    [​IMG]
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  18. MiamiMotorcyclist

    MiamiMotorcyclist used to be -MiamiUly

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    Awesome. Thanks for sharing.
  19. ericm

    ericm Long timer

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    I really want one of those, but with a two stroke motor.
  20. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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