FLOW share some of your moments of this elusive state of being.

Discussion in 'Photos' started by ganze, Sep 23, 2010.

  1. ganze

    ganze lone biker of the apocalypse

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    655
    Location:
    texas
    I had a twenty something year old, career driven kid ask crusty old me why I love motorcycles. I realized that no one has ever asked me that and I had a hard time explaining the whole thing to this non motorcycling, non bmx riding, non surfing kind of kid.

    That and the thread "why I love riding" got me thinking that I would love to see pics that represent that addictive feeling of FLOW.

    For me it's usually attached to riding two wheels as I am not much of a surfer/skier or whatever type. It's usually connected to speed and some risk, but not ridiculous speed or way out of bound risks. Maybe its just because I feel so in the moment that I don't feel the risk of the speed, the lean or the air.

    Let's talk about/show pics of FLOW. What is it, what does it feel like and where do you find it?

    ganze
    #1
  2. ganze

    ganze lone biker of the apocalypse

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Oddometer:
    655
    Location:
    texas
    I'll start with a story that represents what I mean. I don't have pics but would love to vulture some from ZORRO that get close to what it was like. I was with an old motorcycle bud on a three day trip from dallas to the hill country, around the hill country and back kind of trip.

    We left Fredricksburg and picked up the pace a little. It was a weekday and there was almost no traffic or cops anywhere. My bud is a solid dude and experienced rider so I didn't have to worry about him at all. We both knew where to go and didn't have to be worried at all about finding our way together.

    The weather was perfect, it was 60 or so degrees and sunny, with no traffic, with full tanks: just best buds blasting around the hill country. We wound up in the area of 90 mph most of the time, taking smooth lines in perfect light in nearly perfect country. We took some back roads to make it to our destination before dark, the kind of roads where you can see for a mile or two at a time so we felt reasonably safe from deer, cars or speeding tickets. Somewhere I forgot about everything except hitting the perfect line, keeping my momentum up, staying smooth and the sweet sound of a vtwin at 8000rpm.

    The riding got serendipitous and that is what I mean by flow. It happens on the dirt jumps, in the skatepark, in the waves, on the road and lots of places.

    more examples? with pics?
    #2
  3. rednax

    rednax Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    Gothenburg Sweden
    got off my bike just a moment ago. Started at lunch. Was actually going to go from one workplace to another, but the flow carried me past the second place....no more work today, just couldn´t stop. Longdistance runners are said to reach some kind of meditativ stage after some minutes of running. Shit, me I just need the feeling of the engine running and I´m there...floating on winding roads throw the beautiful autumn landscape is my drug...flow :smile6
    #3
  4. Dread Pendragon

    Dread Pendragon Tragic Donkey Throttler

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,710
    Location:
    Smithfield, Utah
    There's a lot to enjoy riding any kind of motorcycle, but I think dual sport/adventure riding is unique in how quickly Flow can be achieved. Obviously you can get into a state of flow doing other types of riding (or any number of things).

    If you're doing a 1000 mile trip on a road bike you may or may not be brought to the edge of your abilities. It might be a fantastic trip for other reasons, but you're not going to find Flow easily if you're not working at the edges of your capabilities. Dual sport riding can bring you to flow quicker and keep you there longer.

    Most dual sport trips I've been on almost immediately bring me right to the edge of my abilities. We adjust our route and make it easier if we run into real problems, or make it harder if we don't feel challenged enough. We almost always run into segments that really stress us out, which later are our best memories.

    My brother-in-law hears about our trips and wants to ride with our group, but he can't understand why we allow so much chaos to happen. He's a great dirt rider and always has a few road bikes, but he works hard to keep things organized and chaos free when he takes a trip. That the inevitable chaos we have to work through is core to the experience is something he just isn't open to. (We explain to him that we do prepare extensively, but running into problems is inherent into the types of trips we plan.)


    For me the best flow experience I get is after 8-10 hours of (sometimes difficult) riding and I'm really fatigued. I have attention fatigue but physically I fight my bike less and start flowing with it.

    Two years ago some friends and I attempted to complete the Tour of Idaho. At dusk on the second day we were driving the last couple of hours across the desert to reach Arco, Idaho.

    [​IMG]

    This is a picture our support truck driver took the next year at the same place at the same time of day. The only difference was that there were a few clouds in the sky, and I was closer to those mountains in the distance. Close enough that the various mountain ranges were all different hues of purple.

    Here is what I wrote at the time (slightly edited):

    That memory is a "happy place" in my mind.
    #4