For What It's Worth: Simple Ideas and Hints/Tricks

Discussion in 'Trials' started by D2W, Jan 27, 2019.

  1. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    Back in the '70s, I used to build model airplanes. There was a series of publications from RCM (Radio Controlled Modeler) called "For What It's Worth" which contained simple ideas and hints/tricks on how to build airplanes (e.g., How to modify clothes pegs for use as small clamps, etc.).

    In this thread I'd like to draw on your wrenching/garage/trail fix/etc. experience as it applies to trials bikes (or [dirt] bikes in general). I suggest that we don't discuss topics (unless there's confusion and clarification is required). Rather, just make a post and others can determine "What It's Worth". :-)

    >>> Mods to help save a GG rear fender <<<
    To reduce the chance of breaking the rear fender of my '08 TXT, I did the following:
    - I used a Dremel/grinding tool to remove the lip on the underside of the fender which normally engages the seat "body".
    - I replaced the metal fastener which secures the fender to the seat body with a nylon fastener. These fastness break/shear very easily.
    - Rather than use two separate small tie-wraps to secure the fender to the seat body I use one large tie-wrap between the same two holes so that I make use of the thicker/stronger part of the fender. I found that when I used just the outer edge of the fender the material would rip. And now only one tie-wrap has to break rather than two in order to save the fender. I actually use two low-strength tie-wraps "in series" to build a long/low-strength tie-wrap. The basic idea is to have a system whose pieces will break before the fender.

    >>> How to keep your shift lever from falling off your GG <<<
    The shift shaft on my '08 TXT300 is not notched to retain the lever clamping bolt. As a result, the lever can fall off if the bolt backs out. And it's too easy to over-tighten the (steel) bolt and strip the threads in the (aluminum) lever in order to get things tight. So to avoid this I've had good success with using Loctite 680 "Retaining Compound". It's an anaerobic (I think that's what it's called) "glue" which is normally used to hold loose bearings, etc. But it works well to hold the shift lever in place. Like most products of this type, a little heat is usually required when it's time to disassemble.

    >>> Increase grip/friction on your clutch and brake levers <<<
    I wrap my levers in waterproof hockey stick grip tape to increase the friction between my gloves and the levers.

    >>> Cutting the perfect hole in your grips for bar-ends <<<
    Just mount your grips and then (gently) use a hammer to pound on the grip end; the bar end will eventually cut/weaken the grip and the plug will drop-out leaving the perfectly sized hole.

    >>> Making it easier to re-use paper gaskets <<<
    I use another Loctite product - an assembly compound called "Anti-Seize" - so that I can more easily remove - and hopefully reuse - gaskets like those used on the clutch cover and flywheel cover. The compound is like a metallic grease and helps to keep the gaskets from sticking to the surfaces being sealed. Note: The compound seems to spread everywhere even when applying the thinnest of layers, so best to wear disposable "surgeon" gloves. Anti-Seize is also what I use when reassembling the bolts in the cylinder and head due to the possibility of a head o-ring leak and the chance of coolant seeping into the threads and making bolt removal "stressful".

    >>> Use skid plate foam to minimize crud build-up between the skid plate and case <<<
    I wedge a small chunk of skid plate foam (obtained from the local dirt bike shop) between the engine case and skid plate immediately below the header/engine junction; the foam keeps the mud that's thrown from the front wheel from flowing under the engine between it and the skid plate. I think the engine should then run a bit cooler.

    >>> Use plumber's Teflon tape to prevent weeping on the gas tank outlet <<<
    On my GGs the gas petcock threads onto the tank outlet and is sealed by an o-ring. I've always had limited success with the o-ring alone. But I do get a good final seal if in addition to the o-ring I use plumber's Teflon tape on the threads of the tank. So far the Teflon does not appear to be affected by the gas.
    #1
  2. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 49 years Supporter

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    Blast from the past!

    Antiseize on gaskets. Like that one.
    #2
  3. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    >>> Stretching the rubber "snorkel" between the carb and the airbox <<<
    On my Gassers ,the junction between the carb and the airbox "snorkel" were poor, with very little overlap. I can't take credit for this idea, but the situation was easily remedied by heating the rubber snorkel with a heat gun, pulling on the rubber, then installing the carb and securing it with the band clamp, and then finally pushing the carb into the block mount and securing it with its clamp. The snorkel retained its extended length when cooled and all was good.
    #3
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  4. grizzzly

    grizzzly The Pre-Banned Version

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    [​IMG]
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  5. Bob_M

    Bob_M Been here awhile

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    RCM was a great magazine. I miss the pleasant aroma of sizzling castor oil. My Sig Cougar has been hanging from the ceiling for over 20 years.

    I jam a slightly deflated soccer ball between the fork brace and the lower triple tree so when I tighten down the lashing straps to secure the front end for transport, the forks won't remain compressed for the entire drive. I have convinced myself it prevents damaging the fork seals but I MUST BE :lol3:lol3 fooling myself.

    Sorry I missed listing the size wheelieman14, mine is a #3 also, it stays put with very little pressure.
    #5
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  6. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    I have seen more forks leak from just sitting than anything else.:imaposer
    #6
  7. wheelieman14

    wheelieman14 Been here awhile

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    Apparently there are 3 sizes of soccer balls, 3, 4 & 5. I bought size 4, which would essentially be almost flat to fit. Do yourselves a favor and pick up Size 3 soccer ball to help hold up your trials bike forks when compressed for transport.
    #7
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  8. Huzband

    Huzband Team Dirt

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    I only compress mine about 2 inches, if that. I'm not racing through Baja or jumping RR tracks, and it doesn't have the girth to move on its own. So no need to lash it down to the stops.
    #8
  9. Solarflares

    Solarflares Been here awhile

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    https://trialstribulations.net/inde...ucts_id=2139&zenid=vf0f385aikc7lsk63tkqvld2v3
    #9
  10. tightwoods

    tightwoods Didn't need that dab...

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    Loctite 515 works great on gaskets and O-rings (https://www.amazon.com/Loctite-555352-Gasket-Sealant-50-milliliter/dp/B0002KKTTA). It's like a tacky grease that stays flexible and doesn't cure like silicone sealant or some other gasket makers. Put a gob on each gasket face and spread around between thumb and forefinger. The gasket won't stick to the case/cover sealing surfaces so it won't get ruined as sometimes happens upon disassembly. And it easily wipes clean from the gasket and metal sealing surfaces. If you have a ruined gasket and need to ride next day just lightly coat the cleaned case/cover surfaces and button'r up! Oil and coolant won't leak out. I always used it on KTM water pump O-rings to ensure no leaks, and it acts as a lubricant to prevent damage while assembling. A couple of dabs holds those thin clutch cover O-rings in place to avoid pinching while reinstalling. Leaky oil drain bolt metal gaskets also like it, and/or put a slight dab on the threads closest to the underside of the bolt head.
    #10
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  11. Norman Foley

    Norman Foley Devotee of the Husqvarna Supporter

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    BFA5DB9A-3709-4B4E-ABD8-81911A639611.jpeg
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  12. wheelieman14

    wheelieman14 Been here awhile

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    Looks great Norman! Big thanks to the guys from RITC (Rhode Island Trials Club) for sharing this tip :-) A bought a couple bright fluorescent green size 3 soccer balls and really like how little compression is required to hold the bikes stable in the back of my van.
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  13. Norman Foley

    Norman Foley Devotee of the Husqvarna Supporter

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    Thanks for sharing Bob!
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  14. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    >>> A cheap and effective front suspension washing tub.
    This is brilliance from a video I saw posted by Cascao on suspension service ( ); use half of a large PVC/sewer pipe. :-)
    #14
  15. Yokomo

    Yokomo Dirt Rider

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    Who has a good trick on how to fill up the gas tank without it all spilling out every damn time! Even when I go slow and check, wiggle bike, dump a little more in, check, wiggle more.... then one more little splash of gas and out she comes, all over my bikes.
    #15
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  16. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Patience, and a smaller fill hose. A no spill gas can works, but still spills if you hurry.
    #16
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  17. oldtrialer

    oldtrialer Trials since 74

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    I don't have any problem spilling electrons when changing the battery.
    :-)
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  18. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Long timer Supporter

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    :nah
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  19. Cascao

    Cascao Been here awhile

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    Bent shifter other day....
    Tryed removing pedal to strenght it with a rock but it wasn't possible due my allen key beiing short.
    Mounted new one with a longer bolt and a spacer...
    [​IMG]
    #19
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  20. Cascao

    Cascao Been here awhile

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    Ps. Shifter from 2010 sherco is shorter and hide itself behind ignition cover.
    #20