For What It's Worth: Simple Ideas and Hints/Tricks

Discussion in 'Trials' started by D2W, Jan 27, 2019.

  1. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    >>> A better way to secure a bike; secure the back wheel <<<

    I came across this technique "by accident" as I needed to prevent the rear end of my bike from bouncing around in my utility trailer as I drove over a washboard road; I ran a strap around the rim/tire, then around a side rail on the trailer, then back through the tire to the rail on the other side, and then back to the ratcheting mechanism near the wheel. What was critical was the strap wrapped over itself at the tire and on one of the side rails, and these wraps then prevented movement of the strap. It's also important that the side rail wrap points were lower than the tire wrap point. When I tightened the strap by way of the ratchet, the wheel was drawn down into the trailer, and because the strap couldn't move/shift on the trailer or tire, the bike stayed vertical and was held in position. :-) So when it came time to secure the front forks, I could run them very loose with almost with no compression on the fork mechanisms. Basically, the fork straps are now just for safety.
    #21
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  2. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    >>> An easy way to hold your drinking tube to pack straps; use a binder clip

    My old riding backpack doesn't have a way to hold the drinking tube on the shoulder straps when I have my Camelback inside the pack. But a binder clip can be disassembled and reassembled into something useful in a few seconds.
    20190602_125502[1].jpg
    #22
  3. motodojo

    motodojo Rock Ninja

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  4. motodojo

    motodojo Rock Ninja

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    hose card holder.jpg

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    #24
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  5. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    I thought I'd place a new "trick" here as Hoss's "Tool and Shop Tricks" thread seems more "mechanical". And, besides, this old thread of mine hasn't come around much lately. :-)

    >>> A trick for storing syringes <<<

    I use (medical-type) syringes to bleed brakes, measure oils, etc., but I often find that when it comes time to (re-) use them, the rubber diaphragm has swollen to the point of sticking, and when I pull on the plunger it pulls out of the diaphragm (and then I spend the next few minutes trying to get it back in ... and work and ... argggg! [toss].

    But then my brother showed me a cool trick; when you finish using a syringe, leave the plunger out a bit (~1/2") so that when it comes time to use it the next time, you first push it in. This little bit of motion frees up the diaphragm and reduces the stiction, and allows the plunger to be retracted much more easily.
    #25
  6. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Sloppy 300 rider Supporter

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    I pull the syringe apart and wipe the rubber clean. Then store it in pieces.
    #26
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  7. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Do not change alot just before an event
    Article from Bones in MX Action.
    The big race is not the proper place to try out a new widget. That’s what practice tracks are for. Even the most inconsequential things can drastically affect how a bike handles. Adding a tooth to get a little more drive will alter the amount of leverage the swingarm exerts on the shock, which in turn will change the sag, the wheelbase and the basic handling characteristics of the bike. One tooth on a sprocket changes the axle position about 4mm, and one chain link longer or shorter will change the axle position about 15mm—that is a huge geometry change.
    #27
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  8. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    >>> Oil and THEN gas <<<
    I mix my pre-mix in small quantities (4 litres/a bit more than a US gallon), and I use one of those translucent (red) plastic fuel containers often used for lawnmowers/string trimmers. I have a mark on my container which gives me the 80:1 ratio I want when I use the appropriate amount of oil. I always had a difficult time getting the gas to the mark; I could never see if the fuel was too high or too low before adding the oil. It then occurred to me to add the (very dark blue Opti) oil first to the container and then add the gas; the gas is tinted by the oil and I can now easily see the fuel level in the translucent container as I add the clear pump-gas.

    Oh ... dunno if this is a Canadian thing ... but I always burn "marked/marine" gas rather then gas from a station; such gas is less expensive as the price does not contain a road tax.
    #28
  9. ZippyGasGas

    ZippyGasGas Long timer

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    Adding the oil to the gas can first also mixes the oil in better when the fuel in pumped into the gas can
    #29
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  10. ZippyGasGas

    ZippyGasGas Long timer

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    this is not necessarily a trick or revelation, but more of something I have learned over the years.

    * Don't get too wrapped up in getting the bike fixed "RIGHT NOW" *
    Yes there are times (mid-event comes to mind) that you need to fix the bike in a hurry.
    what I am talking about is the state of mind where you are frazzled and just want to get that Mother#$#%@#T^# thing apart and fixed!
    when you find yourself all stressed out, and ready to just bash it with a hammer, take a step back, get a beverage and just stop for 10 seconds.
    I know it sounds corny, and like something the workplace tells you about "taking 5 for safety". but seriously sometimes stopping and relaxing for 10 seconds lets you look at the problem with a fresh start and maybe you won't strip the threads in that aluminum casing, or snap that bolt in half. You may actually save yourself time and get back to riding much sooner.
    took me 30 yrs to learn this..... damn I am slow
    #30
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  11. Ymirtrials

    Ymirtrials Long timer Supporter

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    So true, I’ve come up with new swear words and thrown lots of tools before I learned to take a little breather before getting back down to work fixing what I’ve broken.
    #31
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  12. ZippyGasGas

    ZippyGasGas Long timer

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    I used to throw tools and then pick them up after my tantrum. My wife cured me of that, I threw a bunch of tools around the parking lot (lived in apartment complex at the time) she quietly picked them all up and took them into the apartment. She then proceeded to be amused by me trying to find all of the tools I threw. I finally gave up and then found out she had them all safe for me in the apartment. I stopped throwing tools after that. Swear words, Oh *%^&(&( yes I still throw those around like they are free.
    #32
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  13. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    If I might add to Zippy's advice ... "Resist the temptation to imagine the worst and take the (in) appropriate action."

    Basically, slow down when something isn't working right and try to figure it out before you dive in with all your tools. I approach problems as a "lazy mechanic"; when trying to solve a problem, I try to understand all of my options and what steps might be required, and then I assign a "cost" to each, and then I do the cheapest/easiest task first. Being the cheap bastard that I am really helps in this regard. :lol3
    #33
  14. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    Oh ... I just read Zippy's post about removing the rim of his wheel in order to remove a spoke, and then he found that the replacement spoke went in easily ... and it made me think of another (hopeful) pearl of wisdom; don't "break/damage" something in order to remove something that you're going to replace/throw away later. Sometimes destroying an item in-place is easier than trying to remove it whole only to throw it out once removed. So, in Zippy's case, he might have been able to cut/grind the bad spoke out and then slip the new one in rather than dismantle the wheel in order to save a (bad) spoke.
    #34
  15. ZippyGasGas

    ZippyGasGas Long timer

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    Similar experience I had with a tractor I was working on. when I started working on it fuel tank was full of rust, After I got everything running it was burning oil. I was running it to test it out. It stalled and would not start. I instantly thought burning oil fouled the plugs, pull plugs, clean - no run. I noticed in-line fuel filter empty, I instantly thought fuel line plugged by junk I missed in fuel tank. Take fuel lines apart and cleared the plug. to find No plug, but also no fuel......................................... it just ran out of gas........ doh! I should have went with the easy fix first.

    I understand what you mean, there have been times that were faster and easier to destroy a bad part instead of removing it as if it was to be saved.

    But the spoke thing was a little different
    I had considered the cut the bad spoke technique. (I really, really considered it)
    but the head of the spoke did not want to pass by the other spokes to be removed. I wanted to mess with the bad spoke to see how the head of the new spoke would pass the other spokes.
    that way if I did mess up a spoke it was the bad one.
    Also there was not enough room at the hub to cut the head of the spoke off without damaging nearby spokes.
    I would have had to remove approx 4 spokes from the rim anyway to insert the new one because of the angles the other spokes needed to rotated to for the head of the new spoke to pass by and land at the hub.

    but.... I could have potentially saved myself from removing the entire rim, if I would have known only a few needed to be removed and angled differently. :hmmmmm
    #35
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  16. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    And sometimes all you can do is give it your best try. :thumbup

    I often console myself with this quote: "Experience; it gives the test first and the lesson afterwards". :lol3

    Happy wrenching.
    #36
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  17. CDMAN

    CDMAN Been here awhile

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    When installing a new chain - use the old chain to thread the new on on. Take the side plate off the master link. Take one end of the old chain off the master link. Slide the end of the new chain on the master link and then pull the old chain out. The new chain will follow through the guides and over the sprockets. Once the new chain is fully threaded on take the old chain of the master link and then install the new master link and finish the connections. Saves the time of trying to fish a new chain through the guides and over the sprockets.
    #37
  18. Huzband

    Huzband Team Dirt

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    Stopped by my favorite Ace Hardware this afternoon for some cherry wood & a few other things & spotted this cute little job on the shelf.
    20200905_154147~2.jpg

    What's the big deal you ask? The big deal is if you have a Ratio Rite, & who doesn't, you can't measure anything leaner than 70:1. Since modern trials bikes are no richer than 80:1, we've had to be "creative" with measurements. This little fella fixes that.
    #38
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  19. D2W

    D2W Been here awhile

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    And you can use to it for making morning pancakes before the ride. :thumbup

    I just got in from the garage. I had resolved to remove the dog bones and replace the bearings as I noticed that the swingarm slop was beyond acceptable; I could see the linkages moving end-to-end when I lifted the swingarm.

    But I was pleasantly surprised to find that the issue was caused by the frame/dog bone bolts loosening and that allowed the inner sleeve on which the bearing rides to move. A simple re-torquing saved the day. :thumbup Since I was there I did relube the bearings.

    So ... once again I benefit from my own advice ... do the easy stuff first and don't assume the worst. :rilla
    #39
  20. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Just use ounces, 4 ounces in 4 gallons and she`ll run sweet. Simple. If your chicken add another ounce or two. Nothing is as simple using whole numbers. :imaposer If you just have to use glass, remember before ratio rites we used baby bottles.:lol3
    #40
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