Frame jigs

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by mikejohn, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. mikejohn

    mikejohn Long timer

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    So, who's got a frame jig? I need some ideals on building one for my projects, from modifying a frame to hopefully building a adventure bike frame later.
    I am looking for plans and books
    #1
  2. mildhog

    mildhog Long timer

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    I have something like this for my silverwings. This particular one belongs to Dave in GA who is an expert on these bikes. Hope this helps.



    [​IMG]
    #2
  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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  4. Hybridchemistry

    Hybridchemistry ...

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  5. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    We all start at ground zero as far as skill sets are concerned.

    Inmate RoadracerAl has connections with the MotoUniversity in the Bay area. They have a tech section where you can work on stuff.
    #5
  6. huub

    huub Been here awhile

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    i build frames without jigs , just fabricate the parts , and tack them together on the workbench
    if you are happy with the frame, make a very simple steel jig, just to connect the swingarm shaft and headstock with a couple of big lumps of steel to stop the frame distorting when welding it up.

    worked for me...
    #6
  7. pennswoodsed

    pennswoodsed lizards,bugs and me

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    Anything by Tony Foale ,this site http://www.mechwerks.com/Frame_Jig.htm

    See also you tube mostly chopper stuff but applicable just adjust angles and dimensions for your purpose .
    Regards,Ed
    #7
  8. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    Dang, a few years back I would have jumped on that. Two weeks ago I decided I was never going to build a frame but now I'm reconsidering... :evil
    #8
  9. sonic reducer

    sonic reducer Been here awhile

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    I'd say the most precision in a frame jig has to be in the way the head tube is held compared to how the swingarm pivot bolt is held. That is the hard part. Keeping precision in homemade adjustable parts requires some careful planning. Google frame jig, there is a lot of info out there mostly about jigs for chopper building or bicycles. Usually a few sets of tapered cones on adjustable mounts to hold the round parts true (inside register) on a measurable centerline. My bicycle jig is made from 2x2 tube, cold rolled flatbar, various hardware and cones that were purchased from eBay. Nothing that expensive. I had use of a small mill with questionable precision. the bigger and nicer of a mill you can use the easier it will be. I'll try to get some pics of it later but it wouldn't work well for a motorcycle because there is no way to get width with it. You can use stuff like plumb bobs, 6' levels, lasers etc to try and dial it in. In bicycles a lot of people work off a surface plate with v blocks or set height blocks with centering cones.
    #9
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  10. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    Mmm! Frame building! My favorite subject.

    Frame table: I scored a well-used milling machine table, and it's awesome for frame building. Uses milling machine hold-downs. Fixtures bolt into the T-slots. Nice. Heavy, weighs as much as a car engine.

    First, finding a place to do stuff: look into Tech Shop if you have one in your area.

    In the Bay Area, MotoShop has lots of useful mechanical classes, but no fabrication classes AFIK. MotoU has un-partnered from MotoShop: we were putting a lot of effort into promoting their business, but it wasn't reciprocal.

    The intertubes:

    Jody runs an awesome site with, un-ironically, welding tips and tricks. He's a good presenter, and he'll help you with all your welding. Motorcycle specific, he has a couple of segments on welding thin wall tube. Since most DIY guys use MIG, watch all his MIG videos, too. Your welding WILL improve!

    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/

    Searching for stuff is how you learn, and search terms are how you search effectively. Know and understand that motorcycle tube chassis and aircraft tube airframes share about 99% of their DNA. I'd look at aviation sites for fab tips.

    Kent White runs Tin Man Tech, and they specialize in aviation stuff. He's got some info on his site, and sells tools & DVDs, and runs classes.

    https://www.tinmantech.com/index.php

    Just noticed this book in his books section: looks interesting, and cheap!!
    https://www.tinmantech.com/html/bk_aircraft_welding.php
    And, since I'm spending your money, this looks *awesome* -- I'd go for the $85 deal and get the tube repair vid as well.
    https://www.tinmantech.com/html/4130_aircraft_chromemoly_tubin.php


    Books, in order of value (IMHO)

    Buy the whole Carroll Smith package deal -- it's cheaper than buying the ones you want. If you only wanted 2 books, I'd recommend Engineer to Win and Nuts, Bolts, Fasteners & Plumbing Handbook (aka Screw To Win)

    http://www.carrollsmith.com/books/

    I like metal shaping books: after all, what is building an MC frame besides metalshaping? I'm fond of the two Ron Fournier books, and the Timothy Remus Advanced and Ultimate Sheet Metal books. This info will help you with everything which is not tubing.

    http://www.fournierenterprises.com/preview/6m3/books-dvds/books.html

    Remus has been a busy boy! Since the last time I looked, he has put out a third sheet metal book, AND!!!! two books on custom bike building. I'll vouch for his clarity as an author, but haven't read either. The custom bike book seems to be more outcome-oriented than technique-oriented.

    Ron Covell is an innovator in the training biz. He does both reasonably-priced seminars, and DVDs. He has a number of excellent videos, but the two which are most applicable are "How to build a Chopper Frame" and "Motorcycle Tank Building". While it's car-oriented, the "Working with Tubing" vid is excellent as well, it focuses on exhaust tubing, not frame tubing, which is useful. I've met him in person, he's a real nice guy, too. The chopper vid might be a bit basic, but if you really want to go to school, the aviation guys really know how to make good tubing joints.

    http://www.covell.biz/dvds.html

    As mentioned, Tony Foale's books are what you read when you want to know WHY a motorcycle does what it does. Very mathy. The first book from the '80s is a little easier for the average Joe to understand. His second book from the '10s is much more comprehensive, but also more math intensive.

    What is extremely useful is his kineomatic simulation software(s) -- If you want pro-level modeling of suspension systems, he's the go-to guy.

    http://tonyfoale.com/

    And, of course, don't forget the SUPER AWESOME RaceTech Suspension Bible! :D

    http://www.amazon.com/Techs-Motorcy...ion+bible&pebp=1422522225764&peasin=760331405
    #10
  11. dpforth

    dpforth no inline fours

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    Don't forget Bradley's 'the Racing Motorcycle' vol II (if you can find/afford a copy). Actually has a how-to chapter on frame building.
    #11
  12. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

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    If pics of frame jigs help, here's the one I saw at Big D's in Dallas.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Just pics , no dimensions , sorry.
    #12
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  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Links to that ^^^ in post #3.
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  14. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    Yes, I have both volumes, but they're out of print, therefore.... *really* hard to get.... so I didn't include them. I think I paid $100 for each volume when they were available in the US. :eek1

    There are two other "theory" books: the Coco book, and the Cossalter book. Skip the Coco book: Tony Foale said it was full of errors. The Cosalter book is a little more approachable than Tony's work.

    http://www.amazon.com/Motorcycle-Dy...-1-fkmr0&keywords=walter+cossalter+motorcycle
    #14
  15. mikejohn

    mikejohn Long timer

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    Pretty much what I am planning to build, I am a Die maker and Machinist so I plan to tweak it a bit. Right now I plan to mod existing frames as in different swingarms and sub-frames, I plan on getting books on welding cro-moly. I will be retired in 10 more years so I'd like to have a small business making one off stuff for ADV bikes:D
    #15
  16. pennswoodsed

    pennswoodsed lizards,bugs and me

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    You can find Engineer to win and many others very inexpensively . I am looking for the Bradley books ,and others my self.
    Regards,Ed
    #16
  17. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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  18. mikejohn

    mikejohn Long timer

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    Just looked at one on Amazon $3115.00 yes you read it right $3115.00:eek1
    a tad too rich for my blood:huh
    #18
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  19. DesmoDog

    DesmoDog Desmo was my dog. RIP big guy.

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    They must have been running a half price sale. Here's the latest listing I saw. At this price I should sell the copy I have and just buy whatever I was thinking about building!


    ChassisV2.JPG
    #19
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  20. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen

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    Not a motorcycle, but I built my third recumbent bicycle from scratch using a simple wooden jig built on a sheet of 3/4" cabinet plywood. I made wooden v-blocks to space the tube centerlines off the plywood. This made it easy to measure the tubing centerlines spacing to the base plywood. Good for a simple frame setup. It tracks very straight, even when I got the bike up to 45 mph (downhill).
    #20