Fresh mowed grass hazard?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by JerryAtrick, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. JerryAtrick

    JerryAtrick Been here awhile

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    I don't think this post meets the forum guideline but I don't know where else to put it. Has anyone here ever crashed because of freshly mowed grass left on the roadway? An acquaintance directed me to a social media fuss about this "great danger to motorcyclists," which strikes me as BS. Would I go into a corner at full lean angle if I see substantial piles of grass clippings ahead...no. Do I worry about it otherwise? No. Am I missing a huge danger to my well-bring? Perhaps the inmates can enlighten me?
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  2. Smathersfish

    Smathersfish Adventurer

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    Yep. It happened to a buddy of mine. Totaled bike. He was ok except for a few broken bones in his face. His dumbass father had just convinced him that he didn't need a full face helmet! WTF!
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  3. DickButkus

    DickButkus n00b

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    I bit it on wet leaves once, so I could see how fresh grass might be similar if you were already really pushing your luck in a turn. I fucked up quite a bit before the wet leaves became the last part of my chain of fuckery., but I would have remained upright if it weren't for those pretty autumn bastards. Like you said though- with any sort of debris, grass or otherwise, on the roadway would you go balls to the wall into a curve? Probably not. If you are just riding over wet grass, I don't see your bike just slipping out from underneath you as if you were on a spot of ice.
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  4. ninjamunky

    ninjamunky ¡Que buenos son!

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    Wait.., what???
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  5. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever Long timer

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    You might try a search. There have been a few threads about this. They always end in acrimony.
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  6. Scotty P

    Scotty P Funny Like a Clown

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    :D:D:D:D

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  7. dtysdalx2

    dtysdalx2 PITA but useful

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    I'm more worried about a mower throwing a huge rock at me at 100 mph.
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  8. DickButkus

    DickButkus n00b

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    Here's an actual study, correlating different conditions with their coefficient of friction (stopping ability): https://saferroadsconference.com/wp...onal-Characteristics-Roadside-Grass-Types.pdf

    Dry concrete and/or asphalt is anywhere between .75 - .65 CoF. This value is multiplied with the CoF of your tire(s) in your braking ratio to get your ultimate CoF. A wet grassy field is rated at .2 CoF. How much that loss of friction would translate into chopped grass lying in a road is anyone's guess, but based on those numbers I would suspect there is at least an observable loss of friction while driving over grass clippings.
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  9. bandito2

    bandito2 Been here awhile

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    Anything foreign between the rubber of ones tires and the road pavement has potential to be problematic,
    not only for turning but also in braking. The more cut grass on the road, the more of a problem it can be;
    even more so if the grass and/or the pavement is wet. No crashes because of cut grass on the road, but
    did have a couple butt puckering moments... once or twice over the years with leaves on the road as well.
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  10. Vertical C

    Vertical C Long timer

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    People crash on sunny days on dry roads, I am sure it's possible to do it on lesser surfaces
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  11. ozmoses

    ozmoses .

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    Don't mow the lawn into the road was good advice when I was 10.
    It still is.
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  12. ontrip

    ontrip Been here awhile

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    Once it is wet it is green ice. Just like cow manure is brown ice.

    Colleague and very experienced rider slid into a back of a bus because the city crew had left grass when coauthor in a rain storm. They normally clean up .
    #12
  13. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    just another road hazard to be aware of, like when farmer homer doesn't shut his shit spreader off when he crosses the road
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  14. Salzig

    Salzig Been here awhile

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    Or when they move cows from the higer pastures down to the valley before the winter

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  15. TheProphet

    TheProphet Retired; Living the Dream

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    This has been discussed ad nauseum.

    It IS illegal to discharge ANYTHING into a public roadway in most USA States, but apparently never really enforced. Some call out grass clippings distinctly, others include it with littering.

    Likely, there are at least three reasons folks do this:

    1.) Ignorance of the law, and of the danger it creates.
    2.) "Don't give a shit" mentality towards life in general.
    3.) A psychopathic leaning; getting satisfaction out of creating a potentially dangerous scenario.

    Let's face it, folks who cut grass by the roadside for a living are likely not the sharpest knife in the drawer either. You get what you pay for. All one needs to do is position the mower so that the discharge on the final few paths near the roadside are facing AWAY from the road. You'd think it was common sense, and easy.

    Likely the Fine for doing this is relatively low, so towns focusing on generating capital from LEO work place it low on the priority list. More money to be made on speeding tickets and overweight Trucks, etc.

    I live in a very rural, farm and horse raising area. Some Landowners get it, some don't. Roughly 50/50 at best. In many cases, the roadsides are state owned, so State workers mow the area, not the local Landowner(s). We have a Local Weekly Newspaper that prints all the local gossip, police reports, etc. right down to the slightest, tiniest violation. In 40+ years of living here, never once heard of someone being fined. If a State Employee did it, the answer is obvious.

    During mowing season, you expect to see this, so you adjust your riding accordingly, especially around blind curves.
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  16. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    A 4th reason could be not willing to mow with your back to traffic. Personally, that’s my reason. The front of my property is full of ruts from people driving off the road. I like seeing them so I can turn or leap out of their way.

    Dumb is riding so hard on the street that something like grass clippings crashes you. That’s called not leaving an adequate safety margin. At least, in my opinion.
    #16
  17. Turtletownman

    Turtletownman Been here awhile

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    Mowers used for state highway maintenance do not have directional discharge-Bush Hogs.
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  18. STcorndog

    STcorndog No destination

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    I have property in the country and have posted on this before. Instead of whining and hoping the world will see it your way, you are better off learning to ride slow enough to stop within your site distance.

    Even if I was inclined to turn my tractor around and blow the grass off the road and back into the ditch, one of you whiners will likely still manage to come around the curve too fast and slide into me while I am doing it. But, then your whining could be doubled up, as you could blame me for the grass and being in the road with my tractor cleaning up for you.

    You need to read between the above lines very slowly, to really understand my sympathy.
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  19. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    My mower is set up for mulching, so when I mow along the road very few clippings get on the road, and they're so small as to be irrelevant. I enjoy yard work and take pride in it, being lazy and making a mess isn't my way of doing it.

    That said, I know others do it, understand it's a hazard like other forms of debris, and a long time ago a tree across the road taught me to never over ride my skill level, or line of sight.
    IMO, grass clippings are only a hazard to dangerous riders.
    #19
  20. sixspeed

    sixspeed Tired of whining yet?

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    We were told that with the new MS4 and runoff regulations many municipalities are making a stink about blowing grass onto the street. My parents burb noted it in the township newsletter that you will be cited for cutting grass that ends up on the road even though I can't ever recall it being a problem there growing up.

    Once again there is a big difference in some grass coming out of a mulching mower in the spring and leaving a haze of grass clippings in the gutter to someone who cuts grass that hasn't been mowed in a month using a side discharge mower throwing a thick green blanket on the road.

    Most landscaping companies simply use the leaf blower and scatter the remaining grass to the four winds.
    #20
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