From Estonia with love (Round the World)

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by tsiklonaut, Jun 30, 2009.

  1. EyeCake

    EyeCake Adventurer

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    Thank you for the detailed view of your workflow and it really does show in the finished result the time and effort of film over digital give truly deep and dramatic photographs with real feelings and the passion shows.
  2. BELSTAFF

    BELSTAFF ADV NOMAD

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    The meaning of FILM photography & process developing is not lost on those of us that once lugged a B&J 4x5 press around, so you will appreciate this tail of woe,--------
    My wife's aunt,lovely woman,although suffering with advanced dementia, recently GAVE her dead husband's Hasselblatt w/ full complement of lenses to a Goodwill store,When I ask why, her reply was ," It was hard to find film for,cost to much to develop the photos & it made too much noise"--my reply---- "IT WAS A HASSELBLATT FOR CHRISTS SAKE"---
  3. BELSTAFF

    BELSTAFF ADV NOMAD

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    [QUOTE="We simply do not have the money to buy a brand new single cylinder lightweight ADV bike that needs to be pampered and must be serviced meticulously till it reaches 40 000 - 50 000 and then simply throw it into the rubbish bin and buy the brand new one again to be sure it keeps going. For sure it's the best thing for sunday offroad play outings and it's superbly well suited for that, but if you travel and cover more than 100 000 distance in very rough conditions, it makes you think twice...[/QUOTE]

    THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, for that quite eloquent "fuck you & the asian crap you road in on" statement. I get sick & tired of all that chit & the abuse that a motor bike takes that carries riders by the countless thousands around the world dailey and has done so since 1923.
    I challenge anyone to show me a 1923, 33, 43, 53, Kawasaki, Suzuki, Yamaha or Honda be it a museum model or a photo '

    Thank you again.
  4. tsiklonaut

    tsiklonaut the (in)famous boxer perv

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    LOL, a good sense of humor never hurts does it! :lol3

    I'm not that bold though and don't want to turn this into another mindless "Japanese vs others" thread, it's just we had bad experience with our DRZ and we are very emotional now. I'm sure we'll get over it soon.

    In fact I think larger displacement Japanese bikes you get the most of "bike" for the money unlike some overpriced premium European brands, although YMMV case still applyes. IMHO it's the lightweights that tend to cause too many problems on large distances, and I think it's not an Japanese problem, it's most manufacturers, even the premium one, they're just not made for the long run. So it's all ment as a bit of cool aid to the small-displacement lightweight single cyl ADV bike promoters from our side that cover large distances, that's all. We believed all the hype on buying the DRZ but it failed the test in practice. No hard feelings, please forgive us if there seems to be the case! :)

    Ride safe,
    Margus
    kiwial, VTbeemer, SNOMED and 3 others like this.
  5. legasea

    legasea Ape on wheels

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    It's still a great pleasure to share your rides and wonderful old school photos.
    Your balance in life is an appreciated bonus.
    Ah... and don't you think your'e talking to yourself. More or less discrete there is a good crowd following you, since the beginning.
    tsiklonaut and Uke like this.
  6. tsiklonaut

    tsiklonaut the (in)famous boxer perv

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    It wasn't long till we released how large Russia really is. Multiple days we did 600 kilometer distances and when we checked the map, it looked like we hadn't moved at all!


    [​IMG]


    Day after day we rode in the same rhythm, woke up on the cold sunrise, boiled some coffee on our stove, with a quick sandwich eaten we quickly hit the road, passing endless row of trucks in black diesel fumes, most Russian trucks look like they don't even meet the EURO 0 standards. With our noses pitch black and irritating from the inside from the inhaled toxic gases we keep resisting them, we don't have much choice really, it's the fastest way to escape the Siberian cold following us so rapidly. Like that we ride till the lunch time and the small roadside eatery places all seemed to have the same usual menu, then continue the same way till the sunset to find a wild camping spot.


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    Russia is a strange and very illusory country in many ways - the main Trans-Siberian road looks like the developed Europe - the road is in excellent quality, well lined and all the signposts properly done, all the necessary infrastructure is also top notch: roadside restaurants and fuel stations are all there at frequent intervals. Yet, when you turn off from that main road, it's literally after just hundred meters you're back to mud roads, even when there's a large signpost showing a supposedly big town nearby. It feels like Russian government likes the tourist to see their country like a highly developed and cultural superpower element, but deep inside it's heart it's still a third world country. Russian government seems like doesn't give a slightest what's happening outside their big cities. Poor locals have to use the treacherous mud roads to get to work to the nearby cities since finding work at the countryside is very hard after the communist-time farming community system collapsed.


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    Going too fast on those mud roads tends to end not well.





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    But we found it to be a very nice feature that the Russia isn't actually that developed - there's lots of bush and free untouched nature! With just occasional bears, elks, foxes or roes roaming around, it's always a good feeling to be one with the nature.
    gperkins, Seba1, X11-MAN and 14 others like this.
  7. Asianrider

    Asianrider Been here awhile

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    Hi Margus and Kariina,
    glad to see you're back on the road, I almost missed it, tucked at the end of your great first RR ! Great narrative as always, keep it coming.

    Last time we met we were both on long-time trips - several years for you I think. This one is different, you could get off work only for 2-3 months as I understand. How does it feel traveling with a deadline in front of you ? (I know the answer, but would like to hear from you). Reading you, it seems you had to rush the trip to pack all these 1000s of km in such a short time. You literally zipped through Georgia, Pamir, Mongolia, all destinations that we wished you had had more time to explore off the beaten path and share pictures with us. It sure sounds different from your adentures in Africa ;-) Of course, the DRZ breaking down didn't help, but you were anyway short on time I guess at that point.

    So now that you're back, what would you say, is it better to pack as many countries as possible in the allotted time or narrow down to one region and spend more time exploring and meeting with people ? what is the place you'd want to go back to asap ? (I can guess..)

    Waiting for the last pics - is there anything more coming than the russian highway back to home ?

    Laurent
    edd-nor likes this.
  8. Saralou

    Saralou Worldwide Rider

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    Great RR! We are leaving Vancouver May 1 to retrieve our bikes from Leipzig. We are headed from Motocamp Bulgaria May 18 to Stans, Mongolia.....so will be on your trail! Good luck. Sara
    edd-nor likes this.
  9. bartman314

    bartman314 Been here awhile

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    i took a 3 year break (or so) from advrider, and have just come back looking for info on dual sports...

    low and behold, you are both still at it.

    all i can say is what others have said in better ways. you are both incredible & inspirational and are experiencing life as it's meant to be experienced. please please please publish a book and broaden the impact you've had on us to others who aren't riding/forum junkies.
    X11-MAN likes this.
  10. Shaggie

    Shaggie Unseen University

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    If you are ever in New Zealand, we would be honoured to host you!
    tsiklonaut likes this.
  11. Orangecicle

    Orangecicle On a "Quest"

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    Hey, Margus, mine's easier to pick up. :lol3

    [​IMG]
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  12. jyrays

    jyrays The Wanderer

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    I am ;)
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  13. tsiklonaut

    tsiklonaut the (in)famous boxer perv

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    Are you sure about that Brad? Since you don't have those nice sticking out cylinders that won't let it to fall all the way down so it's actually easier to pick that utterly heavy pig up :lol3
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  14. tsiklonaut

    tsiklonaut the (in)famous boxer perv

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    [​IMG]
    Trans-Siberian views.





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    Russia is vast, literally. There's so many nice places to camp.






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    The only problem is - it gets bloody cold!




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    -4C night. Brr...





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    A very decent morning to start a new riding day, filling your lungs with a fresh cold breeze... You just have to make sure you don't crash on those icy roads.
  15. ACD

    ACD old nOOb

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    Hi guys! Have a question: do you guys rely on some kind of heating inside the tent or just have very warm sleeping bags?
    Thanks!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  16. tsiklonaut

    tsiklonaut the (in)famous boxer perv

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    We use regular sleeping bags with a +8C comfort temperature. Hence anything close to zero or below is a challenge for us. We use inner sheets and warm underwear to full body, also sleep with a hat on is probably the best improvement. We cover the legs and central body with riding jackets laid on the sleeping bags. Like this we've found to -2C is doable, less than that it gets a bit too challenging :)
    edd-nor, Uke and Shaggie like this.
  17. jyrays

    jyrays The Wanderer

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    Better sleeping bag would be better than adding clothes on. I have Finnish army commando training and I have slept in a hole in snow when -25 ° C and in tent when - 50 ° C.
  18. Orangecicle

    Orangecicle On a "Quest"

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    You guys need some Enlightened Equipment Revelation quilts. I love mine. It packs down very small.
    Claddaghman likes this.
  19. tsiklonaut

    tsiklonaut the (in)famous boxer perv

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    Solo motorcycles aren't really meant to be ridden in Antarctic type of environments 24/7 to enjoy riding, we just occasionally go into cold places and manage fine with our lightweight and comfortable bags.

    All the sub-0 bags are humongous and very little leg room, not possible to zip together. We like square bags that are possible to zip together into nice one big bag - it's much nicer to share one bag than be in a separate one, tent is our home afterall. :)
    george248, edd-nor, Uke and 1 other person like this.
  20. jyrays

    jyrays The Wanderer

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    I agree, sharing sleeping bag makes it warmer ;)
    I have one with -18 rating that you can zip together, but cannot help you with the brand as I am far from home (New Zealend and Australia) but I will check next week when I get back home.
    tsiklonaut likes this.