Fuel efficiency

Discussion in 'Australia' started by GodSilla, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. Mouse

    Mouse I'm only smelly

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    :scratch

    ^ Point?

    Mercs bigger trucks use a mix of gps/predictive shifting and Angel gear to achieve economy targets too.

    Guess the guys manually shifting bypass those benefits though...
    #81
  2. AUSSIEADV

    AUSSIEADV Long timer

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    Blank!
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  3. BradventureRider

    BradventureRider Power to rip yer bloody arms off!!!

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    If they want to break the existing record then get a faster truck :lol3
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  4. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    Takes time for bike and truck to get up to speed .. so you need a long length of tar (salt = dust = bad lungs for the rider).

    EFI systems have been doing that for decades. No news here.
    #84
  5. abhibeckert

    abhibeckert Long timer

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    Those just shut off fuel delivery. The engine is still "running" in that all the moving parts are still moving around.

    The idea is to shut it down and shift into neutral — so the engine stops completely, with a battery or capacitor topped up by regenerative brakes that slow you down as drivers expect when they're not accelerating.

    Then you can use the power collected to accelerate again. It won't get you all the way back to your previous speed, but it should get more than half way there, saving a ton of fuel.
    #85
  6. farqhuar

    farqhuar Human guinea pig

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    Existing bike speed record is just shy of 270km/h, :eekers achieved 23 years ago. The 130k record (now upped to 144k) was for a rider without a slipstream.
    #86
  7. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    So it needs some kind of auto transmission ... or a manual clutch override. And then an electric motor/generator. May as well go all electric drive like the diesel trains.

    No photos .. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cycling_records#History_of_unpaced_records
    Photo of aero bike https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/a22946/human-powered-speed-record-aerovelo/
    #87
  8. abhibeckert

    abhibeckert Long timer

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    I reckon you could do it with slightly modified manual gearbox, all it'd take is a computer controled clutch and most cars already use that for the accelerator and brake pedals.

    The electric motor is already there for starting the engine. It needs to be bigger if it's going to accelerate the car, but not bigger — they assist the petrol engine rather than replace it entirely. This isn't new technology, nearly all current stop-start systems use the electric motor to get the car moving off the line until the petrol engine starts and takes over. The only change would be to keep the electric motor running alongside the electric motor until the capacitor or battery is drained.

    The real complexity (and cost) is having a regenerative braking system to collect power while slowing the car down. But the fuel saved over the life of a car is probably enough to cover that easily.
    #88
  9. Mouse

    Mouse I'm only smelly

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    Eh? The Merc start stop I've had experience with doesn't use an electric anything to get moving.

    Main diff is it uses electric drive for aircon and power steering so they continue to work even while sitting still. Car might restart and stop again stationary to help out aircon. Push the accelerator, the car starts and off you go.
    #89
  10. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Another tangent. Some years ago BMW reckoned that one reason for diesel being more economical was that it had no intake air flow restriction, like a throttle butterfly. Their testing found that full throttle acceleration of a EFI petrol engine to a given speed, then steady throttle, was more efficient than gentle acceleration.

    Has anyone noted that cars have got a lot heavier over the years? A Kingswood was about 1200 kgs, now a Corolla weighs that much. Mind you the last HX Kingswoods were shit, flat out at about 120 and used about 12 mpg doing it, all in the name of emissions.

    Accelerating a mass to a greater speed takes energy, the bigger the mass, the more energy is required, basic physics.
    #90
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  11. diabolik37

    diabolik37 Deadly Gubba

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    Maybe is time to rename this thread "Electrical efficiency", but that is going to possibly put Troy and myself out of business...

    Oh well... :muutt
    #91
  12. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    If you don't like the start stop engine thing, the ones I've tried won't shut down if you don't push too hard on the brakes. Easing off as you come to a stop, as we all should, then just enough pressure to remain stationary, and the engine keeps running, at least on those I've played in.

    #92
  13. farqhuar

    farqhuar Human guinea pig

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    Wow, this grumpy old bastard sure is full of himself. To me, he sounds like he is straight out of the stone age! :rofl

    My experience of stop/start is quite the opposite - I think it makes a significant improvement to fuel economy in the city. I have been commuting on a Burgman in Melbourne traffic for over 10 years and have experimented with shutting off the ignition at lights (yeah, I know, I'm a tight arse :lol3) and find I can easily reduce my fuel use by around 15% - from 18km/l down to 21km/l.

    Interested to hear of other's experiences?
    #93
  14. Mouse

    Mouse I'm only smelly

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    Hard for me to directly compare. Merc went to start stop plus held a gear longer/lower in the rpm, result was real world economy improvement to about 6L from 9L over a distance of about 80k km with a fair mix of urban and rural driving.

    And that was in a ML, their mid sized 4wd thingy. First version ran the 3L v6, second version the 2.2L sprinter engine, but both pretty much same tune, don't drive sparingly, don't speed but don't slow down either.
    #94
  15. Eaglebeak

    Eaglebeak All roads rider, West Oz.

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    About 5 kms/litre or ~ 14.5 mpg.
    That’s bloody good for such a big, bulky vehicle
    My old Valiant 6 cylinder sedan only got about 16-17 mpg at best.

    And yet some people still believe vehicle economy hasn’t improved much over time.
    #95
  16. Andrew2

    Andrew2 Long timer

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    My VW Tiguan ( turbo diesel) gets 16kpl ( 45mpg ). 1000 kms from a 65L tank. That's only a couple of kpl less than the 1150. Economy has definitively improved.
    #96
  17. rossguzzi

    rossguzzi 990 Adv.

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    I thought it would have done a little better than that.
    My ol v8 Diesel tour bus pulling a trailer got 4km per L. I thought that was crap at the time but had no option.
    Still love your rig tho
    #97
  18. lockyv7

    lockyv7 Long timer

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    My LWB Sprinter and its 7.2m long with a high roof gets 7.5lt/100K my Kia gets 11.5/100K those Euro diesels are good on fuel.
    #98
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  19. LivingdeadCamo

    LivingdeadCamo Long timer

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    Had a year or two driving one for a living, they're a good thing. Five of us used to race fully loaded up Kariong hill at 4am hahaha.
    Good to drive and were reliable too.
    #99
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  20. a2zworks

    a2zworks Así es la vida

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    My 12 month old Hilux 2.8L diesel doesn’t reach 500km with 70L
    I do have a heavy foot, but bloody hell that is sure too much for the “latest” technology.

    Oh yeah, great thread and excellent camper truck build I love it.