1. Adventure Rider Print Magazine!
    We're doing a print magazine this November - 128 pages of high quality adventure riding stories, photography and interviews!

    Click here to purchase a copy for $9. Limited copies still available.
    Dismiss Notice

Gardiner Family Adventures

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by FamilyRider, May 24, 2016.

  1. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Day 3 started off clear and sunny - just like all of the others day. Are you starting to see a pattern here?

    [​IMG]

    We packed up camp and rode down out of the Henry Mtns to the Notom Road. On GoogleEarth this looked like a pretty boring ride, but it was actually very pleasant and more scenic than I expected. We even saw a small herd of buffalo.

    The Notom Road is a fast cruise if the washboard isn't too bad. Just as we approached the Burr Trail switchbacks, another rainstorm moved in. It rained all the way up the switchbacks, so my video didn't turn out too well.

    We decided to take the side spur to the Upper Muley Twist trailhead. This is about a 3 mile ride down a wash. It was a fun ride.
    [​IMG]

    At the trailhead, there was also a short hike to an overlook above the Notom Road and the water pocket fold of Capitol Reef.
    [​IMG]

    A few years earlier my wife and rode around the Wovlerine loop in our SUV. The entire time I kept thinking this would be a fun ride on a dirt bike. So, we included it in our route.

    The main road is mostly pretty easy on a dirt bike, so we took the shortcut called the "Cutoff Road" on some maps. This cuts off the SE corner of the loop. I wouldn't recommend this route in a stock SUV, but it was a blast on a dirt bike. After we rejoined the main loop, I saw a tarantula crossing the road. That was the first tarantula I have seen in the wild. I thought I got it on video, but it is so small it is really hard to see, so I cut that part out of my video.

    We stopped for lunch at the Wolverine Petrified Wood trailhead. We changed into our hiking shoes (at least those of us that hadn't lost a shoe along the way). A friend told me the best wood is about 1 mile in.

    At about 3/4 of a mile in, I noticed a lot of wood on the side hill of the canyon. I wandered over to take a look while the rest of the group continued down the wash.
    [​IMG]

    When I got up on the hill, I could see a huge storm moving our way - fast.
    [​IMG]

    It was obvious that this storm was much larger than any we have had on previous days. I wanted to get out of there, but the rest of the group was farther down the wash, and I had no way of contacting them.

    The storm hit when we were about 200' from the trailhead. There were huge gusts of wind - one of which blew over Bob's bike - and a lot of thunder and lightning. We took shelter from the rain under a small Juniper bush near our bikes - not a great place to be in a lightning storm. The storm hit with a vengeance.

    Once the rain let up a bit, we decided to get moving and get out of there. Luckily the soil was quite sandy, so it wasn't slippery mud. But the rain came in so fast, it was running off the dirt and forming rivers in the road.
    [​IMG]

    I remembered that the road followed the wash for a little ways, and crossed it several times, but eventually climbed up out of the wash bottom. So we moved on.

    The wash got deeper and deeper as we went.
    [​IMG]

    It became really difficult to follow the road in some places. The berm along the sides from the road grader where the main clues. As you will see in the video, there was one place where I wasn't sure which way to go. I then noticed the berms to the left, and went that way. It turns out I had turned into Horse Canyon. The Wolverine Road actually went to the right. Horse Canyon was a merger of two streams; the one we just rode down, and the one we should have ridden up. Thus, the stream got really deep real fast.

    We went about 0.3 miles before the river got so deep that we dared not continue. We pulled off the road at a place where we thought we could camp if necessary, but it was only a few feet higher than the stream. We watched the stream steadily rise, and eventually it began to drop. We waited there for about one hour before someone noticed on their GPS that we missed the turn.

    Rather than risk riding back up the river, we found a cow trail that cut over to the main road. Once back on the main road, the stream quickly got smaller and smaller.
    [​IMG]

    I really enjoy dirt biking, and I really enjoy river running. But I found it best not to combine the two sports. Flash floods can have very serious consequences.

    The rain picked up again as we returned to the paved Burr Trail. We were glad to be out of the dirt, but wanted to find a place to camp as soon as possible. We quickly rode through Long Canyon and found that no one was in the Deer Creek Campground. Of course, there were warning signs at each of the camps saying not to camp there if there was a chance of flooding.

    We decided it should be safe, so we set up our tents and then the sun came out - about 3 minutes before it set behind the nearby sandstone cliff. Thus, we didn't have any time for our gear to dry out before loosing sunlight.

    We also felt relieved to be out of the flash flood, but we were also glad of the experience and the lessons we learned that day. It really was an adventure that day.

    What should have been an easy ride, only covered about 93 miles. But we were happy to be camping at 5700' elevation instead of high up in the Boulder Mtns as originally planned.
    #61
    TheAdmiral likes this.
  2. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Here is part 1 of day 3's video:

    #62
    TheAdmiral likes this.
  3. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    And here is part 2 - with the flooding on the road...

    #63
    TheAdmiral likes this.
  4. TheAdmiral

    TheAdmiral Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,107
    Location:
    Frosty Hollow, Idaho
    Sure got interesting when the storm hit in the second video (Wolverine Loop & Burr Trail). Earlier this year my wife and I rode up a wash which is usually dry but had running water. Farther we went the faster and deeper the water got.

    I once saw a Tarantula on a tar road near White Sands in NM. Far a distance I thought a turtle was crossing the road. As we got closer I could see I was wrong.

    The switchbacks and spur looked pretty fun too. Enjoying your series as usual. Thank you for sharing these rides.
    #64
  5. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Day 4:
    As you may have guessed, day 4 started off clear and sunny... just like all of the other days. Deer Creek campground is in a fairly narrow canyon, so we didn't get sunshine until fairly late. We wanted to dry our tents and clothing, so we didn't get started until about noon.

    We rode in to Boulder to buy gas and supplies, and then headed up Hwy 12 over Boulder Mtn.
    [​IMG]

    Rather than take the pavement all the way, we turned off on road #180/169 - Big Ridge. This is an old Jeep road that somewhat parallels the highway. We could see another storm moving in, so I wasn't sure taking this route was a good idea. But we were here to ride, so off we went. The road is somewhat rocky along much of the trail, but not overly difficult. Occasionally it would break out with a nice view of Capitol Reef.
    [​IMG]

    The storm was getting closer.
    [​IMG]

    And larger. Here you can see Lower Bowns Reservoir in background.
    [​IMG]

    We eventually popped back out on the highway, and of course it was now raining again. It was a short jaunt down to the turnoff to Lower Bowns and the Rosebud ATV trail. I have been wanting to ride the Rosebud trail for years. I was somewhat disappointed. It is just a rocky ATV trail - nothing special.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I found that the dark soil wasn't too slippery in the rain, but the tan colored soil was. I went down at one point while trying to turn on my grip heaters.

    We stopped for lunch at Lower Bowns, and luckily the rain let up for a little while.

    After lunch we started down the Pleasant Creek road with the intent of dropping into Capitol Reef. As with the Rosebud trail, the tan sections were a bit slick.
    [​IMG]

    There is a fairly steep, sandy descent as the road approaches Tantalus Creek.
    [​IMG]

    Tantalus Creek was running high and fast due to all of the rain.
    [​IMG]

    I used a stick to test the water. It appeared to be about 2' deep at the crossing, but about 10' to the left, it was less than 1' deep.
    [​IMG]

    Bob and Ross were right behind me when we arrived a the crossing, but Ron and Danny were not to be found. Bob and Ross headed back to see what the holdup was, while I tested the river depth. No one returned, so I headed back up as well.

    It turns out that Danny's tent had fallen off his bike, so he went back to look for it. He went back as far as Lower Bowns, with no luck.

    Ross and Danny were sharing the tent, so that meant two of the group had no tent - and guess what - it keeps raining. We considered our options and decided to head to Torrey and get some motel rooms. So we went back up the trail to Hwy 12.

    When we arrived at Hwy 12, we decided to have Danny and Ross go back to the Big Ridge trail where Danny was riding in the rear. Bob, Ron, and I waited at the Lower Pleasant Creek campground. The sun poked out from behind the clouds for a while, so we tried to soak in the warmth.

    Luckily they found the tent! But we were cold and wet and decided to stick with the plan and find a motel. But I guess everyone else had the same idea. We couldn't find enough rooms at any of the motels in town.

    After trying several motels, the sun came out again. We decided to camp just east of Torrey in a spot along the highway. I guess this is a popular overflow camping spot because there were people everywhere.
    [​IMG]

    We had just enough daylight left to get our tents set up when it started to rain again. Luckily it didn't last long, and we had a nice clear evening to enjoy the stars. We logged about 114 miles that day in spite of the late start. You can really rack up the miles when riding pavement.
    #65
    TwilightZone likes this.
  6. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Here is the video for day 4:

    #66
    Marcus I. and TheAdmiral like this.
  7. TheAdmiral

    TheAdmiral Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,107
    Location:
    Frosty Hollow, Idaho
    Yeah, I was thinking you were getting rained on every day. Hopefully, you don't have that tire sticking gumbo mud when it gets wet. A slippery trail is bad enough but to be stopped dead in your tracks with the gumbo...not good.

    A month or so ago I was the "trail depth finder gage" when we had a water crossing. It was pretty mushy all around the crossing and I didn't want to tear up the soil so I volunteered to go first through the water. It did cross my mind to use a stick beforehand but I said what the heck and went forth without doing it. It was fine. I'd be pretty leery of the running creek ones though like you encountered.
    #67
  8. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Yesterday I learned that the stream in the video is Tantalus Creek. I thought that was the only stream crossing on that trail, but it turns out the 'real' stream crossing is just before you hit the pavement in Capitol Reef - after Tantalus Creek combines with Pleasant Creek and Sulphur Creek. In normal flows, it is a tougher stream crossing. With the rain, it may have been deadly.
    #68
    TheAdmiral likes this.
  9. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    I forgot the GPS track for day 4:
    [​IMG]
    #69
  10. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    You guessed it. Day 5 started off nice and sunny. That was good because Bob had to change a leaky tire.

    This was our final day, so we had to get back to our cars near Salina. We were lucky and didn't get any rain this day. Unbelievable! But we did encounter some mud.

    We broke camp, rode back in to Torrey for gas, then headed north on the Great Western Trail.
    [​IMG]

    This part of the Great Western Trail rocks. Or should I say, this part is very rocky. I think it was about 12 miles long, and the first 10 miles or so are just a rough, rocky Jeep road. Not hard - just rough. At one point, Ross commented that my kids would hate the trail. I said they would be just fine, but my wife would hate it. I jinxed us.

    The first few miles actually aren't too rocky - but trail navigation was a bit challenging. Luckily we had a GPS track from D-Mac to follow.
    [​IMG]

    But most of the trail looked more like this:
    [​IMG]

    It would occasionally open up into a spectacular view:
    [​IMG]

    But the last few miles got pretty nasty. You eventually go through a 50" ATV gate. Just prior to the gate, the trail got significantly steeper and rockier. Ross was right - my kids would hate this trail.
    [​IMG]

    Some of the climbs were quite long.
    [​IMG]

    But then the trail smoothed out. I call this the "cream filling". Rough crust on either end, but smooth in the middle. My wife likes the cream filling.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And then we hit the wet slimy stuff. The other crust. Most of the wet section was very ride-able, but I went down quick when I hit these slimy logs. They would be easy on an ATV, but treacherous on a dirt bike.
    [​IMG]

    Right after the logs there was a slippery climb that had everyone sliding all over the place. That opened into a small meadow - a great place to take a break.
    [​IMG]

    From here, it was a pretty easy ride to the top of the mountain, we we joined forest road 206, which goes past Elkhorn Campground.

    My original plan had us riding FS206, HWY 72, and FS640 along the Fremont River. This would have been an easy and fast way to get back to the car. But, since it wasn't raining, and we had so much fun on day one, we decided to take the Great Western Trail back to the car - the way we came up on day one.

    The leaves had increased in Autumn color, and the trail is fun going either direction.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And the stream crossings were noticeably larger as well.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    But then we hit mud again. We had to go over one pass at over 10,000'. It had snowed up there. The snow was still melting, so the trail was very soupy.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I went down two more times in the mud, and Ross went down a few times on his heavy KLR. Ross actually did extremely well on the rocks and the mud with that heavy machine.

    The ride was really fun, but the rocks and mud were taking their toll on us. At just after 4:00 PM we decided to bail out and take the pavement back to the car so we could get home at a decent hour. We clocked in about 80 miles for this final day.

    Everyone seemed to thoroughly enjoy the trip. We had a lot of fun trails, some fast trails, plenty of beautiful scenery, and some great memories of dealing with severe weather. I think everyone made a list of lessons learned and things to do differently next time (such as water proof my clothing, pack lighter, etc.). In terms of making great memories and stories, this trip may be tough for us to beat.
    #70
    VietHorse, Mudclod and TheAdmiral like this.
  11. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Here are the videos for day 5:





    And here is the GPS track for the entire 5 day loop:
    [​IMG]
    #71
  12. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    For more photos and more detail about our 5 day adventure, check out my blog.
    #72
  13. sweins

    sweins Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2017
    Oddometer:
    17
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    What size fuel tank do you use for the kind of miles you seem to cover. Just bought a 2015 KTM 500 XC-W and looking for a larger fuel tank. I dunno if i want to go for the mammoth 5.3 gal or if the 4.1 gal would be sufficient. Just in the process over the course of the winter to setup the bike and camping gear to spend a week out at moab come march. Enjoyed your posts, glad you get to spend as much time as you do with your kids.
    #73
  14. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Excellent question. I have written a fairly detailed report of the options on my blog. And when you still need a little extra, here are some options on how to carry a little extra fuel.

    In summary:
    * I generally use the stock tank (2.25 gal) for day rides.
    * My kids have the Acerbis 3 gal tank, giving them about 150 mile range.
    * I sometimes use the KTM 13L (3.5 gal) tank, giving me about 175 mile range.
    * Or the KTM 19L (5 gal) tank, giving me a 250 mile range (you probably won't get quite this much with a 500, and it depends on your sprockets and trail conditions).

    The hassle is swapping the fuel pump, so I eventually bought an extra pump, which makes swapping tanks really easy. I found a good deal on a used 19L tank with fuel pump. Otherwise I would have purchased the Acerbis 5.3 gal. I think the difference is that the KTM tank will fit with the anti-smog canister in place.

    But I think the 4.1 gal is best all around size if you just want one tank for dual sport. Of course, it really depends on your plan. On my last trip, one of the guys only had about 125 mile range, so we planned accordingly.
    #74
  15. sweins

    sweins Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2017
    Oddometer:
    17
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Do you find the weight shifts when the fuel sloshes around? I'm trying to think of what disadvantage there would be for getting the 5.3 over the 4.1 gal. Sounds like the physical shape is about the same with the width only being 1/2" wider on each side. Unless the 4.1 was more rigid to offer better protection of the rads, that would be worth going for the 4.1 then. Since I'm just starting to rig up my bike for camping, i stumbled across this blog with tips on how to pack light. Is there anything you would add that he might not of covered. Planning a trip to Moab in march and the only real uncertainty i have is in regards to a light weight sleeping bag. I've read some advice on this forum when shopping for a bag, pick one that has a rating 20F lower then what you figure you will be camping in. I really like the concept of the Sahara designs backcountry sleeping bag but not sure if it's rating of 30F is adaquate for march. No firm dates have been set and it looks like the temps can range anywhere from 15F in early march to 60F by the end of march for a low. Do you have any advice or suggestions as to what works and what you found doesn't.

    http://livelikepete.com/4-day-motocamping-gear-list/
    #75
  16. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Did you intend to include a link to the blog on packing?

    I have not noticed fuel sloshing around at all in any of my tanks. But the width and weight are noticeable for more technical day rides. I used to use the 3.5 gal all the time, but with the more narrow stock tank, the bike just feels more nimble.

    Packing is both an art and a science. I tend to be conservative and carry more than I ever use. More tools, more food, and more clothing. Thus, I always have a hard time getting everything to fit. I also have a blog report on rackless luggage and tank bags.

    I pack differently every time - still in search of the best approach. I now have the basics down, but move a few things around each time - and sometimes from day to day. You need to think about what gear you absolutely must have, what you should have, what you would like, and what you really don't need. You will find the bags fill fast, so you have to start leaving things out.

    Also think about what you want to access during the day. That is what has led to most of my changes - I sometimes need to get to my jacket, or food, etc.

    I have a friend that packs super light. He has Wolfman E12 saddle bags (which aren't very big) and a backpack. He refuses to put anything on the rear fender. I am amazed at all the stuff he pulls out at camp, but a lot of it is in his backpack.

    I have another friend with a KLR that brings a lot of gear. I am basically in between. I want to camp in relative comfort, but not have a bike that is too heavy to handle.

    When you first start riding with gear, the bike will feel strange. But within about 30 minutes you get used to it, and it isn't much of an issue after that - assuming you have it well balanced and don't have the weight too high or too far back. I do try to ride more smoothly. I avoid quick actions that would more likely cause a tire to slip out or me tip over. For example, I will go over rocks rather than around them. So my riding style is different, but as long as the trail isn't too technical, it works out fine.

    In general, I follow this guideline:
    * Tank bag - stuff I want easy access to; inReach, camera, charging cables, snacks, warm gloves, hat.
    * Front fender bag and tank shroud bags; tools. I try to put some heavy stuff up front.
    * Saddle bags; clothing, stove/fuel, utensils, dinner, breakfast, sleeping bag.
    * Rear dry bag; tent, air mattress, chair, camp shoes.
    * Backpack; lunch, snacks, wallet, down jacket.
    #76
  17. sweins

    sweins Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2017
    Oddometer:
    17
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Thanks, that was full of all the right information although i'm still leaning towards the 5.3 gal tank. I was given an older KLIM sledding backpack with a tool pouch and bladder bag. Tried reading up on some other forums, what i'm trying to decide on right now is what sleeping bag would be idea for Moab in march. What do you use for a bag?
    #77
  18. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    I decided to go with a down bag because they are light and pack down quite small. I find they also breath better than most synthetic. But it is important to keep it dry, so I pack it in a compression dry bag.

    Most of the time I use a Big Agnes Summit Park 15*. The Big Agnes bags pack smaller than most because they don't have any insulation on the bottom of the bag. They rely on an insulated pad. I use the Big Agnes Q-Core. It can slip inside a sleeve in the bag, but I usually don't bother stuffing it in. It is larger than many bags, which gives me a little wiggle room.

    For summer, I use the Big Agnes Deer Park 30*. It is newer than my Summit Park, and I don't like it as well. It has zippers on both sides, but they are underneath me, so they are a pain to operate.

    I would suggest going to your local sporting goods store and try some out. I don't think brand matters much, so just find one that fits you well and seems comfortable.


    One advantage of the 5.3 gal tank is that you will never be wishing you got a bigger tank. The 4.1 would probably be perfect 90% of the time, but that other 10% you will be wishing for a larger tank. I put marks on mine at 1, 2, 3, and 4 gallons. That way I can easily see how much fuel I have left, and I can just fill it as much as needed for the next leg of the journey. Although for a multi-day trip, I always just fill it. The weight hasn't been an issue since I have so much weight in my luggage on the rear.
    #78
  19. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    I haven't been on any more adventure rides this year, but I did get out for a few fun day rides. If you are interested, you can find videos on either my YouTube channel or my Vimeo channel (Vimeo has a higher quality playback engine than YT).

    And for those with a little time to kill, here are my annual blooper and highlight videos...





    [​IMG]
    #79
  20. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Mojave National Preserve - Day 1

    My friend Bob invited me to go explore the Mojave National Preserve in southern California a few weeks ago. I was able to arrange my schedule to join him, and then at the last minute Ron decided to come as well. We planned four days, which included a 7-hour drive on each end.

    We managed to cram all three bikes and all of our gear into Bob's pickup truck. We left early Wednesday morning and returned late Saturday evening.

    We arrived at our staging area at about noon, and quickly rigged our bikes and headed south along the Ivanpah Road into a stiff headwind.
    [​IMG]

    We ventured off the main road and explored Sagamore Canyon. This gave us a chance to get used to riding our bikes with luggage, as well as make any needed adjustments to keep the luggage from flopping around. On the way back towards the main road we got a great view of the massive extent of Joshua Trees.
    [​IMG]

    We stopped briefly at the OX Ranch to discuss our ride options.
    [​IMG]

    We considered heading over to the Indian Well petroglyphs, but decided to save that for later. We found an old road that headed west towards the New York Mountains. I previously saw someone's comment that there was a nice campsite up Caruther's Canyon. We didn't want to camp that high in the mountains since the weather was colder than expected and windy, but when we got there, we all agreed that was the place to camp. It was a fabulous camp that offered good shelter from the wind and had a really nice stone and cement table, bench, and firepit.

    It was only about 3:30 when we found this great campsite, so we decided to go explore part of the Mojave Road before setting up camp. We found a fun and quick way west and south before reaching the Mojave Road. Our intent was to ride east to the Indian Well Petroglyphs, and then return to camp.

    The road followed a sandy was for a few hundred yards. Bob and Ron missed the exit from the wash, so I stopped to wait for them to come back. Since they can ride in sand much faster than I can, it would be difficult for me to catch up to them to tell them about the junction. At times like these, I really miss riding with helmet radios like I use when riding with my family. I ended up waiting about 50 minutes for them to come back. They decided to stop for a snack break and wait for me. I tried to contact Bob via our inReach satellite communicators, but I didn't have his inReach address. So I texted my wife and had her try to contact Bob's wife and see if she could reach him. Just as she was about to call, Bob and Ron came back. We now didn't have time to reach the petroglyphs, so we headed back and set up camp.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    We logged about 62 miles, as shown by my GPS track in cyan:
    [​IMG]

    It got dark about 7:00 PM so Bob hit the sack. I think he slept for about 12 hours. Ron and I didn't want to lay in our bags that long, so we stayed up and enjoyed the stars and a good chat. But it soon got too cold, so we both headed for our tents as well.

    After our September ride with all of the rain, I decided to buy a Kindle so I could read in my tent. I had to be in my sleeping bag to stay warm, so it was hard to find a comfortable reading position, but I did manage to kill a few hours before hitting the hay.
    #80
    NSFW and VietHorse like this.