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Garmin GPSMAP 60CSx - As good for road use as "the others"?

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by LasseNC, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. LasseNC

    LasseNC XSessive!

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    Hello

    I am a GPS newbie. I have been searching for a gps for a little while and came across a Garmin Quest2, but unfortunately it was discontinued.

    Today I then found the Garmin GPSMAP 60CSx, which looks like a hiking/marine GPS.

    Is it still a viable option for motorcyclists? Now on the garmin site it says it comes with a map for America, but I am more interested in Europe. Does that exist?

    Mounts available?
    #1
  2. Joerg

    Joerg Long timer

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    Hi,
    Did you use the search function? I bet you will get hundreds of hits for that unit :evil

    If you look for a "motorcycle-only" GPSr, there are better units available, but the 60/76 Cxx series are among the most versatile GPSr on the market - I use my 60CS for hiking, outdoor, motorcycling, car.

    Then buy from a reseller in Europe. Or buy the USA version and use OSM (OpenStreetMap).

    Of course. Personally I favor the unit from bikertech.de.

    [​IMG]
    #2
  3. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Joerg has pretty much said it all again x

    But to add: I just bought a 60Cx recently to replace my GPSII+, and not least so that it can display map data. I like the compass display, and the programable data fields for information (altitude, long/lat location etc.)

    It's true it can route along highways in the same way as a 'car' type unit can, find points of interest (fuel, hotels, banks etc), and that you can upload other maps (you can buy City Navigator Europe on a SD card or CD and upload it to the card in the GPS60). The 60 series is also waterproof, and has dedicated buttons which you can use in gloves - all good for motorcycle use.

    However, the screen on the 60 series is rather small, and personally, I tend to use my Garmin 2610 on the bike for general (including dirt-road/off-highway) use. It is a fantastic unit, very intuitive, easy to use (even with gloves on) and has all those functions mentioned above - except the compass display, although it will show heading... In fact the only downside with the 2610 is it doesn't have batteries, so it has to be connected to the bike/car power, or use a mains supply when away from the vehicle.

    But for general navigation, I'd say a 2610 is better for bike/car use.

    J xx

    ps. as for mounts, I'd recommend the RAM cradles and arms - very good value and well-designed.

    pps. Just read your post again - the 2610 series is also discontinued now, but you can still get them at a great price either secondhand or manufacturer refurbished units though various resellers - check ebay...
    #3
  4. john_aero

    john_aero Long timer

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    I just got a garmin colorado,

    great lil device and just as good if not better than the csx. mate mine uses one now for some time and he loves it and uses it now over the zumo 550
    #4
  5. duhgee

    duhgee Been here awhile

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    I've had a couple of GPSs, and the 60CSx is my preferred. I had a larger screen Magellan and it reflected light horribly on the bike. The 60CSx works great. Good size, durability, waterproofedness, battery consumption, usability with gloves, and brightness. I too use a RAM mount - it cracked in the freezing cold, but they were quick to replace it for me (lifetime warranty).
    #5
  6. dad2bike

    dad2bike Retired! Cranky Old Fart Supporter

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    I love my 60CSX for my off-roading bikes. I also have 276C that I use in my truck & on my 950 Adventure.
    I've got one of these coming to keep mine safe. I'll be painting it Hot Orange just in case It gets ejected for some reason.
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=550178
    #6
  7. T-Stoff

    T-Stoff Been here awhile

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    Does almost all of what the traditionally motorcycle friendly GPS's do except talk.
    #7
  8. john_aero

    john_aero Long timer

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    when on bike last thing you want is voices ringing at you.

    any way you wont go wrong with garmin and the hill walking/auto gps are now i think the best all rounder as get everything you want and more for less money
    #8
  9. LasseNC

    LasseNC XSessive!

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    Seems like it fits the bill 100%, thanks guys.
    #9
  10. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    many consider the 60csx the best unit for bikes
    #10
  11. T-Stoff

    T-Stoff Been here awhile

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    I suppose it all largely depends on what and how you need your GPS. If all you do is the traditional waypoint setting, hiking, cruising, tracklogging, general navigating in wide open, wilderness spaces, perhaps leisurely stopping any time to check coords, or even when you're somewhat familiar with the area or route to take, then the Garmin 60Csx's standard features might suffice. An error of a few tens of meters or a few seconds might not be detrimental.

    But in a busy urban setting, with lots of traffic and unfamiliar streets, minimum speeds to maintain and hazards to avoid, I think the LAST thing I'd want is to constantly look down at a small, sunlight washed out screen mounted on my vibrating handlebar, anticipating how far and when the next turn will be because I could hardly hear the audio prompt beep through my helmet.
    #11
  12. marcoue

    marcoue Been here awhile

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    I use both the Zumo 550 and the 60CSx as a backup.

    The 60CSx is more precise, better for tracks therefore better for offroad riding.

    Routing is almos impossible (in comparison to the 550) for me for many reasons.
    • Recalculation is slow.
    • Screen is small.
    • Brightness of screen isn't sufficent
    • highlighted road (when routing) is too thick so it covers too much of the lines witch are often side or crossing streets
    • Almost impossible to enter or modify a waypoint while driving
    • Menus are too complicated to be used while driving
    All that said, I really enjoy it as a backup, to record data, for it's presicion and accuracy.

    I usually put my road maps on the Zumo 550 and my topo maps on the 60CSx.

    Hope this helps!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

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    :huh
    What are these "errors" you are talking about? The 60CSx is probably as or MORE accurate than any consumer unit out there.

    If I ever find myself in a "busy urban setting, with lots of traffic and unfamiliar streets, minimum speeds to maintain and hazards to avoid" all I need is a straight line to the "wide open, wilderness spaces".:evil

    You are right, if you are constantly riding in unknown urban areas searching for addresses or something you better get a Zumo with blue tooth directions pumped into your helmet. That kind of situation constitutes maybe 1% of my riding.

    marcoue, if you are doing anything much more complicated than zooming in/out or if you are trying "to enter or modify a waypoint while driving" - I think you better pull over anyway!

    That said - yes, there are better street units. The 60CSx will still do most of what they will though, and still let you navigate tracks offroad.
    #13
  14. Dano 407

    Dano 407 One Man Wolfpack

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    I have the 60CSX and use it in my car and two motos. Hell, I even put it on my bicycle once in a while.

    RAM mounts are the deal. Just get a cradle and a few mounts and you are off and running. I use a suction cup mount in the car and 1" ball mounts at my mirror bolts while on the bike. You will need to buy a 12v charger somewhere as well. Not a big deal. I think I got some stuff at "The GPS Store".

    Very versatile; you wont be sorry.
    #14
  15. Joerg

    Joerg Long timer

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    Hi,
    Just for the record, there's no such thing as a "12 V charger" for those units since the batteries cannot be recharged while in the unit - it's a "12V power supply".

    This being said, pfranc.com supplies all kinds of connectors or cables you might need for that unit. Disclaimer: Yes, I am pfranc retailer (for Switzerland).
    #15
  16. T-Stoff

    T-Stoff Been here awhile

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    You misunderstood. I meant rider error, not GPS error. In wide open spaces, even if the GPS says to turn at this spot now, your turning a few meters or seconds farther down the road (because you missed the audio prompt) would not matter so much.

    Nix, if in urban where a RIDER "ERROR" of a few meters or seconds (again, because he missed the prompt) would mean finding another exit ramp miles away and recalculating from there.


    Really now, would I collect this much if I thought they were inaccurate?

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=12174136&postcount=2843
    #16
  17. marcoue

    marcoue Been here awhile

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    After crossing Canada - and back - I can tell you that I had lots of time to use and play with my Zumo with tasks far more complicated than zooming in or out!!!

    But let's not start that debade on safety again PLEASE!!!
    #17
  18. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

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    I have a GPS V, a 60Cx, and just got a Nuvi 500. I think the Nuvi operates much like the Zumo.

    Not meaning to start a safety debate again - I probably mess with mine while riding more than most. I just don't think the menus are that complicated and after using the 60Cx for some years I can use the buttons by feel. I did the Continental Divide Ride in 2007 from Omaha, Nebraska, 5300 miles (8530 km), so I had time to play while riding across high desert and Great Basin.

    With the Nuvi I have to look at the touch screen to see what I'm pushing.

    Screen brightness/visibility is a toss up between the 60 and the Nuvi IMHO - each is better under different light conditions.
    #18
  19. bigborefan

    bigborefan Making new friends

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    I just unboxed a 60CSx. Do you have to buy additional Map software. The software for this thing is not intuitive at the least.
    #19
  20. marcoue

    marcoue Been here awhile

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    As I was saying! This is not a motorcycle GPS in my humble opinion!

    As for the maps, if I remember well, it only came with the World Basemap so yes, you need to purshase other maps if you want to use it to navigate.
    #20