Garmin Montana

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by AugustFalcon, May 18, 2011.

  1. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    City Navigator was locked when I bought my 60cx ~15 years ago.

    It is not inconceivable to me that one could copy .img files of nonlocked maps like Topos from one device to another. But I have never tried it.

    Back when I had the 60 I was always having to create .img files with different sets of map tiles for different rides due to the limited amount of map memory available.
    So copying and existing .img file would probably not have been that useful.
  2. simon crewe

    simon crewe Been here awhile

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    Mentioning OSM maps in this discussion may be confusing for some people reading this, they are not a Garmin product, are not locked in any way, are free of charge and will load on almost any device.
    Everything Ken has mentioned is completely correct.
  3. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    If you backup your Montana, including its map card to a USB stick via xCopy in Windows and get all the hidden files, Basecamp will see the backup USB stick as a Montana. Works much faster than the Montana to access the map. My backup USB stick is permanently plugged into my PC. xcopy g:\ h:\ /r /e /h /v /y /s
    wbbnm, I82l8 and Anders- like this.
  4. SteveAZ

    SteveAZ Long timer

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    60csx is very old

    They've been locking maps for quite a bit longer than that... I remember locked maps in the x76/x96's which were out around the same time as the 60csx... I was definitely dealing with locked maps a long time ago - like early 2000's...
    EmmEff likes this.
  5. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

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    Yes, you can copy nonlocked maps between devices with no problems. Whether it's useful or not depends on your individual situation.

    My Nuvi 765T was released in 2007. It came with City Navigator North America which was a locked product from the time it came out much earlier than 2007.

    ...ken...
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  6. Bengt Phorks

    Bengt Phorks Been here awhile

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    I had a flash drive that would not identify with my PC and the solution I found was to assign the flash drive a unused drive letter. Your Garmin may have the same issue.
  7. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    I tried this too without success. Windows updates have been very active over the last weeks and the problem came and went again, so pretty confident its something Bill's team have played with, along with some quirk of the Montana's drive implementation, but :dunno
  8. Bengt Phorks

    Bengt Phorks Been here awhile

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    You can use automotive mode to follow a prepared track. The icon will be larger, it will give you a much larger display of the turns and it always points in the direction you are going so you can see which way to turn.
  9. TwoUpTourer

    TwoUpTourer Long timer

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    Good tip - much appreciated, and will give it a go on my next outing.
  10. TwoUpTourer

    TwoUpTourer Long timer

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    A friend is buying a Zumo XT, so it has made me think about Basecamp compatibility in general. I'm on a local Facebook ADV group here in Oz, and I keep seeing basic questions regarding GPX files, making/transferring etc etc, so I decided I'd volunteer and run an intro class for a few of them in the back room of a pub somewhere. Suddenly I've got 24 people signed up! I did spend 20 years managing a mapping system in local government, so I have a good understanding of the whole background structure to roads and property, which ties in to what ADV guys want to legally(or not!) ride through.

    MapSource was before my time, Montana speaking, and so Basecamp is pretty much all I've used. My basic understanding is that plug a Garmin in, and Basecamp will recognise it, but how far back and forward that goes I don't know. A friend has an old Zumo550, about to be replaced by the latest Zumo XT. Is it known whether Basecamp will happily recognise these two ends of the spectrum? I expect that with 24 people, every sort of GPS is likely to be being used, and understanding the limitations of Basecamp will be useful.

    One further thing, is that within Basecamp, what is the difference between a list and a GPX? I create a blank list and then drag a few GPX tracks onto it so that I can display multiple tracks at the same time, but in some tutorials I've seen, they seem to equate the two, which makes no sense to me, given that I can demonstrate that the way I use it, is that it is little more than a notepad list of GPX files that I put on it. Am I confusing something here?
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  11. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    I did a GPS intro a while back for some locals. I only had time for the intro, but I reckon its important to have the basics understood before moving on. This was my cheat sheet for the session:

    GPS Introduction

    Not about how to use YOUR GPS, but some basic principles that can help you figure out your device.

    Developed originally for the USAF, known as Navstar, becoming fully operational in 1995. Subject to ‘selective availability until 2000. As a result, other systems went into development.

    Other systems are either deployed in full, partly, or are in development:

    · Russian Glonass

    · China BeiDou

    · European Union Galileo

    · India NAVIC

    · Japan Quasi-Zenith

    Various mapping systems around the world were adjusted to suit, like Australia’s conversion from AMG to GDA/MGA. The earth is not a perfect sphere.

    Generally available receivers use Navstar, some like Garmin, add Glonass. Other constellations may be added in the future.

    A minimum of 4 satellites needed to get a position fix. Orbit is known centred on geocentric earth centre. Therefore distance to each satellite is known. The satellites carry very stable atomic clocks that are synchronized with one another and with the ground clocks.

    GPS satellites continuously transmit data about their current time and position. A GPS receiver monitors multiple satellites and solves equations to determine the precise position of the receiver and its deviation from true time.

    At a minimum, four satellites must be in view of the receiver for it to compute four unknown quantities, ie XYZ and the clock deviation from satellite time.

    Maps

    · non routable

    · Routable

    o Direct bypasses routing

    · Tracks vs Routes

    · Waypoints to force route, definition varies

    · Recording

    · Uploading

    · Desktop software

    Good luck :thumb
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  12. TwoUpTourer

    TwoUpTourer Long timer

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    This is immensely useful!
    That background info is important for sure, and you've summarised it a lot better than I could have.
    Because this is aimed specifically at ADV riders, I will cover routes a bit, and specifically the difference between routes vs tracks, I'll be mostly teaching track creation for areas that routes won't work. I will be covering Google map creation/publishing, Basecamp mapping, conversion to GPXs etc, then I'll show them the easy way that I use, Plotaroute.com.
    Importantly for a lot of these guys is interpreting tracks they see on Google Maps and whether they can legally use them or if they are private property.
    Thanks again for your input!
    biker128pedal and BergDonk like this.
  13. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    I still reckon if you got your head around Basecamp you'd have no need for any other software :D
  14. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

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    regarding your gpxx/list question a list is a name that basecamp uses for storing and organising data,comprising of gpx s
    a list is a gpx(or a series of gpx s) and they are stored in a list folder.The gpx files can be viewed in a text editor and edited too.They are just large text files .Open one of you r gpx files with say note pad and you will see its just a giant list
  15. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Not so. They are all stored in the database inside 'My Collection'.

    A list is a form of a report/query in Db talk, ie a subset of the complete data set. Hence any changes you make to an object anywhere in Basecamp applies across the board, wherever that object appears.
  16. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

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    the whole database is "mycollection" no?

    i based my descrition on what i see in basecamp upload_2020-7-19_19-16-6.png
  17. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Sure, but it helps to understand what is going on. Storage of all the gps objects is all in My Collection. Lists are not storage as such, just subset views of what is in My Collection. Nevertheless, Lists are another stored database object, but they don't store the data, just a specification to access a view of what is in My Collection.
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  18. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

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    I see thanks for the insight
  19. TwoUpTourer

    TwoUpTourer Long timer

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    It's the lack of aerial photography in Basecamp that GoogleMaps does have, which is also available as a built in layer at Plotaroute.com in the paid version, not the free version. It obviously allows me to view directly the terrain I'm mapping, which Basecamp can't. I've used it a lot in Japan to wind my way through freeway exits and narrow streets, and here to determine rideable roads vs the theoretically existing but as yet unbuilt tracks. I know Basecamp will give me a functional route, but it's not enough to balance the benefit of the aerial, IMHO of course! :)
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  20. TwoUpTourer

    TwoUpTourer Long timer

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    Okay this now makes sense, and matches what I see. It is just a list of the various other files held within MyCollection, be they a GPX or a waypoint, and it can be used to display whatever is on that particular list, excluding anything else that may also exist in MyCollection. A "view" as you say. When I was still afflicted with the curse of work, I used views constantly when extracting data out for our MapInfo application, so I get it now.
    BergDonk likes this.