?? Glue for Carbon Fiber to Aluminum ??

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by ExTex, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. ExTex

    ExTex Been here awhile

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    I have a project to glue carbon fiber rods to aluminum mounting brackets.
    What glue choices are good for this ?

    Thanks,
    Ride Safely,
    #1
  2. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    Post up a photo of the parts as you intend to bond them together.

    I glue things together for a living.

    Once I see your parts I'll offer up a suggestion.

    Dirty
    #2
  3. macrae85

    macrae85 Been here awhile

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    Evo Stik "Impact" (eBay.co.uk) sticks anything-super strong!
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  4. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    Look forwards to Dirty Sanchez's reply.

    My opinion is that this sounds a whole hell of a lot like archery arrows to their hardware.

    AKA carbon fiber tube to aluminum insert.

    And in which case most people use some form of epoxy, some use superbond type adhesives, and some use polyurethane/gorilla glue type adhesives.
    #4
  5. Skippii

    Skippii Milkshakes, my lad.

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    What sort of carbon fiber rods?

    I just ask, because I've known a lot of people to use the term incorrectly, and while carbon fiber composite rods do exist, they're not as common as graphite rods which people incorrectly call carbon fiber.

    Carbon fiber composites are plastic with layers of fabric inside. They're actually made from glue (epoxy, etc) that turns into plastic, so if that's the stuff you've got, then I'd guess an epoxy would probably work best. You see the patterned texture easily. Fishing rods are sometimes made from this kind of carbon fiber rod.

    Graphite rods, on the other hand, are actually pretty much just carbon, which is really slippery and really hard to glue.
    They're usually solid rods, and are used for making things really stiff, like the necks of musical instruments. (Some companies actually make the whole necks from graphite). You can also find hollow rods, like those used in arrows and crossbow bolts.


    The names are often misused, which can lead to problems since they're totally different, so I just want to make sure we're talking about the same thing before anyone recomends certain glues or anything.
    #5
  6. KungPaoDog

    KungPaoDog Been here awhile

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    Graphite, carbon fiber composite, aluminum or whatever it is that you want to adhere you should use Hysol 9394. Or just use some 5 minute epoxy and re-glue it every few months.
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  7. KungPaoDog

    KungPaoDog Been here awhile

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    Oh, and be sure to prep the surfaces well with whatever method you choose.
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  8. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    The Hysol would be decent, but depending on the joint design, loads, impact resistance, etc., etc., or amount of part engagement with the other, another adhesive might prove to be a better choice.

    Aww, hell, a worn out piece of juicy fruit might work. Have you tried that?

    PM me with your number if you don't want to talk it through on the board and I'll give you a ring.

    Dirty
    #8
  9. ExTex

    ExTex Been here awhile

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    Yes, Carbon Arrows from archery, to make a bow stabilizer.

    Not sure why my boss won't just purchase one, but he wants to make one for himself.
    Since I want to keep him happy, I volunteered to assist him in the project.
    Untill he provides the materials, I am unsure of what we will be working with.
    The last bow & arrow I shot was for 8-yr-olds, in the 20th century.

    Thanks for the ideas.

    It seems to me that fiberglass would be a better choice.

    More to discuss with him next week.

    Ride Safely,
    #9
  10. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    Ah.

    Well stabilizers are a unique device.

    You can approximate one by taking 3-5 arrows, cutting them the same length. Using standard aluminum inserts, gluing them inside the arrows.

    Machinging an aluminum round with 3-5 holes, and a central stud threaded to the bow, and for adding weight.

    But honestly, he should just buy one.

    They are pretty cheap.
    #10
  11. xrdcarbon

    xrdcarbon Adventurer

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  12. the_gr8t_waldo

    the_gr8t_waldo Long timer

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    a lot depends on what the mating surfaces look like. and even if you get the alum. cleaned, it'll prove to be the weak element in the matrix.
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  13. 74C5

    74C5 Long timer

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    As per the above, either EA 9394 or EL2995 whichever you can find. Hard to beat 9394 or 934 on aluminum. You might get better results with the 2995 if the graphite bondline is the one your going to be worried about. Aircraft supply houses are often the best sources for the public.
    Some performance depends upon gap filling too though.
    Aggressively abrade the aluminum and clean with acetone or brakleen. Lightly abrade the plastic and clean with acetone if it will tolerate. Wait 30 minutes and bond.
    #13