Goin’ to Montana for a demo ride

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by ScottFree, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Quick update; more tonight (and more pictures): currently in Livingston, Montana. About 120 miles on the Himmas so far, of which about 50 are gravel and dirt. About 30 miles into the trip, I noticed my high beam indicator was on (no matter whether the switch was on high or low); then found the headlight wasn’t on at all. Rode without headlight to Big Timber, bought three feet of wire and a roll of black tape, and fixed the bad ground. Cost of parts: $3.00. Cost of four years of engineering school: a lot!

    Two pictures before I dive into the sushi at Neptune’s:

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    Picking up at Rocky Mountain Motos.

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    I think this is on West Boulder Road between McLeod and Livingston, but not entirely sure. More later; sushi has arrived!
    #21
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  2. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Into Ennis for the night. What a mostly great day! Before we get to the pretty pictures, let me finish (I think) the saga of the dead headlight.

    When it first went out, the high beam indicator on the dash was on, regardless of whether the switch was set to low or high. And the little LED marker light (which, I think, is not on the lighting circuit) was also out. All my circuit theory courses told me the problem was a bad ground, with a small amount of current running through both bulb filaments in series, and eventually to ground through the indicator lamp. So, a couple feet of wire, one end shoved into the bulb connector and the other grounded to a mirror mount, solved the problem.

    Until it didn’t: after dinner I found the light was again out. But, this time no high beam indicator, so not a grounding problem. Wiggling the wire made it go on and off. Much tracking got me to a four pin connector, up under the gauge cluster, that was working itself loose. First pin to come out was the ground. So, using all fifteen of my fingers, I worked the connector back on and got a satisfying snap from the locking pin. Light works. Continues to work after I disconnected the grounding jumper. So I think I have a permanent fix. Yay!

    Pictures from Bridger Creek and West Boulder roads in next post, after I unload Nikon and GoPro cards. After the dirt roads, we stopped in Livingston for seafood (I had sushi, RB had fish & chips). Nice of the town to un-pave Main Street just for us.

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    We’d had good weather up to this point. But, afternoon in the mountains in late summer... monsoon season. We picked our way along the I-90 frontage road, managing to stay off the thunderslab till we were a mere ten miles from Bozeman. Ten miles of hell, as the skies opened up like it was the end of the world. How heavy was the rain? This heavy: Montana drivers slowed to 35 in a 75 mph zone. Even through my Roadcrafter suit, the impact of the raindrops hurt. Didn’t see any hailstones, but maybe some were mixed in.

    Alas, no pictures of the storm, as I’d put the GoPro in the saddlebag after lunch. Probably wouldn’t be anything but blur anyway.

    Rain let up as we left Bozeman. Had a nice run down to Ennis. Gear is almost dry!
    #22
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  3. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    So here are some of the still photos.

    We took MT 78 from Red Lodge to Absaokee, where we then turned onto route 420 (paved) and onto the dirt on Johnson Bridge Road (across a neat old truss bridge) to Stiiwater Road. This ran mostly across rolling grassland and was gravel with a lot of loose stuff.

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    The sign notes that we are on the “Bloody Bozeman Trail.”

    We took Stillwater to Stockade, which took us into Sweetgrass County. Here, the road was narrower and more graded dirt, less loose gravel. We liked this a lot.

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    Eventually we went down a long, steep hill into a rather foreboding canyon. At this point I got worried. The road was fine, but the website had said it wasn’t very interesting. Were we on the wrong road? No cell service, but the GPS confirmed we were now on Bridger Creek Road.

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    The canyon was pretty desolate, the result of fire or Asian beetles (or both). Eventually it got into prettier country. Don’t know why I didn’t shoot more photos, but I’m pretty sure I had the GoPro running.

    Bridger Creek Road dropped us into Greycliff, where we took the I-90 frontage road to Big Timber. From there, south on MT 298 for 16 paved miles, during which we actually passed somebody (we need the license plate frame: “You’ve just been Himalayaned—passed by 24 horsepower!”). Then we turned onto West Boulder Road for the 20-mile ride to Livingston. This road had some great views.

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    By the time we got to Livingston, we’d gone 130 miles, about 50 of them off pavement.

    After Livingston, about 70 miles of pavement and rain. What fun!
    #23
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  4. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Some GoPro frames from today...

    Going over the nifty truss bridge to Stillwater Road:

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    Bridger Creek Road:

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    Oh, and one more thing: even our motel features an unpaved parking lot!

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    What could be better?

    On to the Gravellys tomorrow!
    #24
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  5. simondippenhall

    simondippenhall Simondippenhall

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    Great ride report, thank you! What do you make of the bikes?
    #25
  6. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice The Virginian

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    Good to know about Red Lodge renting the RE HIMALAYAN.

    I did some research last month and failed to discover this.

    I just googled Red Lodge Himalayan and I found it.

    Thanks for taking the time to make the RR.

    Im a student in Missoula, MT.
    Ive already got my August and September planned out.

    I might bring in my riding gear and rent from them next late summer of 2020.

    Have a good'n.
    #26
  7. Deflave Sr.

    Deflave Sr. Been here awhile

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    This thread has made me like reading again.
    #27
  8. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Saturday: Getti’ dirty in the Gravellys

    Yesterday’s fifty miles of generally well groomed gravel was the appetizer. Today’s ride was the main course: some gravel, but mostly dirt, rocks, gullies, steep grades, cow flops and a bit o’ mud for seasoning. Plus some absolutely eye-popping scenery. In other words, just what we came for.

    That last is important. I don’t have a lot of interest in riding dirt for the sake of riding dirt; there’s got to be a “there” to make the trip worthwhile. The Gravellys did not disappoint.

    We got up to an iffy weather forecast: cloudy early, storms late, but in between about a five or six hour window of dry and maybe sunny weather between about 8 am and 2 pm. So the plan was pretty simple: head south from Ennis on Varney Road, which turns into both Gravelly Range Road and dirt at the fish hatchery. Continue south on Gravelly Range to Black Butte. Then, depending on time, weather, state of tiredness (we are Old Farts), we’d either continue down to the end of Gravelly Range Road and head back north along the Ruby River, or take Standard Creek Road down to US 287.

    So, maybe a dozen miles of pavement to Varney Bridge (a beautiful classic truss that’s being torn down and replaced), then a few more miles of gravel, and then the fun begins:

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    Notice the little brown sign with the arrow pointing up, and the road that looks like it’s going straight up the mountain... yep, that’s where we’re going. At the time, it looked pretty steep. Little did we know...

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    Top of the hill (first of many), after a couple tight U-turns on steep upgrades. That’s the Madison River, halfway to heaven if you’re into fly fishing, waaaay down there. We are done with “improved” gravel roads; from here on out the road is pretty much just dirt and rocks... which the Himmas loved.

    Just after I shot this picture, a pickup truck went by, towing a long horse trailer down the hill. A reminder that to us it’s an adventure, to the guy in the truck it’s another day at work, and to the horse it’s just going to another pasture.

    The next twenty or so miles were riding along the Gravelly Range, on dirt and big rocks, into and out of the woods, up and down hills. The Himmas handled it with ease. Uphill? Thing pulls like a tractor. Downhill? Put it in first and let that single pump air. Erosion cuts across the road? Stand up (most of the time we were sitting comfortably; the Himma is not a GS) and bounce across. The Himmas didn’t just make the dirt road easy; they made it fun.

    And, of course, there were the frequent stops to gawk at the scenery and go, “Wow...”

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    (And we weren’t even halfway to Black Butte yet)

    Snow! In August!

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    And if you look carefully, you can see the road going on and on...

    I don’t know if this is the highest point on the road, but it’s the highest elevation sign we saw.

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    A bit further on, we ran into a family group: a couple four wheelers, a couple dirt bikes...

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    ...and the dog.

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    They were kind enough to take our picture.

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    (I’m on the right) Is my hair really getting that thin on top?

    (To be continued)
    #28
  9. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    So, after about thirty miles of dirt road, we got to Black Butte. It was everything people said it is.

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    Decision time. We were averaging about ten miles an hour because of all the stops to stare at the scenery (we were making a relaxed twenty when we were actually moving). At this pace we’d be getting back onto pavement around sundown if we followed our original plan. Or, we could cut down Standard Creek Road and be at the paved road back to Ennis in about two hours—an hour before the monsoon storms were supposed to start. We went with the latter. We’d encountered a few muddy spots and found the Himmas’ stock Pirelli MT-06 tires weren’t great in mud. Didn’t want to be out on dirt roads when the rain started.

    Mile or so down Standard Creek Road, we came to the Black Butte Cabin:

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    The folks we ran into earlier were staying there; said it cost $25 a night. Great price, but... no electricity, no air, not sure about heat, and you have to walk across the road to an outhouse. Did I mention they said they’d seen a grizzly bear in the area? We’ll stick with the lodge, thank you. They also said we should help ourselves to the beer in the cooler, but since it was Busch Light we decided we’d wait till we were back in Ennis and could visit the micro-brewery.

    We didn’t see the bear. Just as well, as we had no pepper spray. Or those “bear bells” that are supposed to make bears go away, though maybe the Himmas made enough mechanical racket to serve the same purpose. We did see some other people, camping and trying to spot the pair who’d supposedly hiked up this cliff:

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    Do you see them? I don’t either. The campers also told us about a moose they saw a mile down the road. We didn’t see that, either.

    What we did see was a lot of water.

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    And mud.

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    I let myself get sucked into a muddy tire track here, the front wheel started slithering around, and I had to put both feet down and dab my way out. I suspect that if I’d been on my GS, I’d have ended up with a face full of mud. The Himma was just inconvenienced a bit. We were really glad we had only the occasional sloppy stretch. Would not want to be here in a storm.

    It’s interesting how different people approach messy spots. Like this unavoidable puddle: my approach is to hit it fairly quick and splash out as much as I can (hey, it’s a rental bike; I don’t have to wash it). Riding Buddy prefers to sneak up on the puddle and go through with the minimum of splashing.

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    Even though he’s riding the white bike and I’m on the black one, his looks much cleaner!

    All too soon, Standard Creek Road widened into the dirt equivalent of an interstate, and dropped us onto US 287 for the 70 mph run back to Ennis. Yes, on level ground the Himma will do 70. If you’re patient.

    All told, 100 miles today, of which a bit more than half were dirt. Much more interesting and challenging dirt than yesterday. But great fun.

    We beat the rain back to the motel. And to late lunch/early dinner. And to the pool. In fact, we’re still waiting for the rain. Maybe it’s falling up in the mountains. Maybe not. One way or the other, we now have a reason to come back.

    Rumor had it the rain will arrive tomorrow morning and stick around all day. So our ride back to Red Lodge may be sticking to pavement. Oh boy—we may get to ride Bear Tooth Pass in the rain twice in four days!
    #29
  10. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Loving your RR! Thanks!
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  11. Rocky Mountain Motos

    Rocky Mountain Motos On a long leash Supporter

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    Great to see you boys riding the bikes as they were intended. Very entertaining ride report!
    #31
  12. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Resuming the tale, now that I’m in a place where iPhone, hotel wi-fi, and ADVrider play nice together...

    Sunday: Weather Forecasters, Gas Gauges and Other Liars

    Sunday (the day we had to travel back to Red Lodge), the forecast called for a 60% chance of morning rain turning to afternoon storms. As if to make the point, we awoke to the pitter-patter of raindrops on the motel roof at 6 am. Even after the rain stopped, things looked pretty gloomy.

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    We decided to stick to pavement, and ride back via Yellowstone Park and Bear Tooth Pass. Besides (we rationalized), we hadn’t yet really tested the Himalayan’s handling on a twisty mountain road.

    So we set off south, toward West Yellowstone. A dozen or so miles out, the sky did a strange thing: the clouds burned off and it became a beautiful sunny day. To celebrate, we successfully passed another vehicle in a 70 mph zone. It took a while, but we did it!

    By all calculations based on our Friday/Saturday mileage and the Himma’s tank size, we had more than enough gas to make West Yellowstone. But the gauges kept dropping and dropping. By the time we got to Earthquake Lake, the trip meters were counting miles ridden on reserve and the gauge on both bikes were barely above the E.

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    We were getting a bit worried when we came across a tiny station in the middle of nowhere. $4.35 a gallon! I believe it was “Ripov Brothers, Inc. Still, when the gauge is barely above empty...

    Both bikes took 2.5 gallons. Which means we both had at least 1.3 gallons left. Who was it said, “There are lies, damned lies, weather forecasts and gas gauges”?

    Into Yellowstone, grateful that we both have the federal Senior Pass that lets us into National Parks for free. $30 for at most two people on a bike? Meanwhile, seven people in a minivan pay $35. I guess they figure motorcycle riders are all wealthy.

    Still expecting the weather to turn on us, we didn’t make many stops. Couldn’t resist wading through the chaos of the parking area to take a gander at Gibbon Falls.

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    Our plan had been to not ride off pavement. The Park Service had other ideas—a construction zone with a few miles of dirt, occasionally moisturized by a water spray truck. The Himmas seemed to handle this a lot better than those rough, tough SUVs, which slowed to a walking pace in places.

    Right turn at Mammoth, and for a time much lighter traffic.

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    Between Tower and Silver Gate, we ran into the usual Lamar River bison traffic jam. Thirty-one years ago, I sat on my bike watching nervously as a huge buffalo sauntered down the road toward me, snorting now and then, before finally ambling into the field. Same thing happened Sunday. This time I had the presence of mind to tap the button on the GoPro. At least this stationary Depends Moment would leave me with some great video.

    Nope. When we were safely past the bison, I looked in the little display. FULL, it said. Once again, the GoPro finds a way to disappoint. If it’s not a dead battery at the crucial moment (even though it was charged last night), or a spattered bug covering the lens, it’s a full card...

    The sun was still shining at Cooke City, so we made a lunch stop. Buffalo burgers, of course. The bison is a magnificent animal—magnificent and delicious!

    And then, up Bear Tooth Pass! The Himma was a hoot. Had to wring its little neck to get some power, but the light weight and good handling made it a ball. Mind you, it’s no sport bike, but it’s a heck of a good time.

    For those who haven’t been over Bear Tooth, the descent into Montana looks like this:

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    If you look carefully, you can see the road.

    From the bike, the view was even better.

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    And

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    Too soon, we were in Red Lodge and it was time to drop the Himalayans off, pick up our Harleys...

    ...and go do laundry. Nothing like the romance of motorcycle travel...

    Attached Files:

    #32
  13. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks for sharing your adventure with us!
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  14. simondippenhall

    simondippenhall Simondippenhall

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    Merci. Hope you will do a post ride review of your impressions of the Motos...
    #34
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  15. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Oh, I will. Probably not till I’ve gotten home and had a few days to ruminate.

    Meanwhile, a bit of catching up...

    Monday: 100% Bison Free!

    Back on the big bikes, going over Bear Tooth Pass for the third time. Sunny day, but chilly. I had a great time going up to the pass, but by the time we got to the Bear’s Tooth, my teeth were chattering and my fingers were going numb—even though the grip heaters were set to “Blast Furnace.”

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    OK, where’s the Tooth? In and out of clouds. This pic is better.

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    It’s the pointy thing at the center.

    The RB enjoys the protection of an Ultra:

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    Having gone over the Pass three times, we figured we ought to take a summit photo.

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    On the way down, we stumbled onto a bit of Bear Tooth Pass history: at one time, the road went over this little bridge:

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    The current bridge is much longer, higher and more expensive...

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    ...but it does round the curve a little.

    So, down from Bear Tooth and into Yellowstone Park by 9 am. Fresh card and full charge in the GoPro, so of course no bison sightings. We’ve both been to Yellowstone many times, so the plan was to just cruise through the park and spend our time in the Tetons. Easier said than done, with construction, congestion, and new improved lower speed limits. We didn’t get down to Jenny Lake till about 3 pm. Luckily we were still able to get a ticket and ride the boat across the lake.

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    Once across, we hiked to Hidden Falls.

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    Hardly hidden in my book...

    We continued about halfway to Inspiration Point, where the view inspired us to say, “that’s inspiring enough.”

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    And that was that. Down to Jackson, where we checked into the motel I’d used seven years ago to the day. Not a bad Last Day Together. On Tuesday we’d be going our separate ways.

    Attached Files:

    #35
  16. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Greetings from Paxton, Nebraska! Just in case you were wondering, no, I’m not dead yet, despite the best efforts of a coyote on the way to Battle Pass, a construction company that unpaved five miles of Colorado 13, and any number of brain-dead car-pointers. Just had a succession of hotels with lousy wi-fi. So no pictures, but I thought I’d try to give a sort of bottom line on the Himalayan.

    I was trying to answer two questions with this rental:

    First, can the Himma actually tour? My bikes don’t go on a trailer (unless they’re broken), I live near Chicago and like to ride in places like Utah and the Carolinas, so any bike I own has to be able to do 2-400 miles a day with a full load of gear. An ADV bike has to do this on unpaved roads.

    Second, will it be fun? I remember my touring-converted 1979 XT500 being fun to ride, at home on pavement and dirt. The 2008 KLR650 I bought in 2013 and the 2006 R1200GS that replaced it in 2015 felt big, heavy, and awkward, and dirt-road touring on both of them seemed a lot more work than fun. Of course, I was 28 when I rode the XT; now I’m 65, with a patched-up shoulder and a store-bought hip—could it be I’m just too old for this ADV thing?

    The Himalayan answers both questions with a resounding “yes!” We rode these bikes over 500 miles in three days. Two of those days were over 200 miles (one of them including 50 miles of gravel and dirt), while carrying all the gear I’d brought out on the Harley. This included eight days’ worth of clothing, riding gear for hot/cold/wet/dry days, a pair of sneakers, electronic entertainment stuff, maps and documents, even a six-pack cooler and a half-gallon vacuum bottle for taking ice water into the desert (notice the “MOAB” sticker at dead center of the Harley’s windshield). Definitely not minimalist! All this stuff fit easily into the luggage provided by Rocky Mountain Motos (Rigg Gear roll-top dry bags semi-permanently mounted to Royal Enfield side racks, and a Chase-Harper tank bag), plus my 50-liter waterproof duffle on the back seat. I didn’t even have to use the luggage rack. The bike barely noticed the stuff was back there.

    While the Himalayan is far from a hot rod, it kept up with traffic on Montana roads that were posted 70 mph. We got passed from time to time, but the bikes were all-day comfortable at 65. The engine doesn’t seem to be straining at this speed, and the balancer does a great job—smoother at 65 than I remember my KLR being.

    There’s room for improvement, of course. The seat’s only so-so, a bit low for me (6’1” with a 34” inseam), and it does tend to slide me forward till my knees hit the those tubing things on the gas tank. I think I’d want to install the Seat Concepts tall/flat upgrade. And take the rubber inserts out of the footpegs.

    The windshield works better than I expected, but once the rain starts it becomes obvious it’s too small. Those big, heavy Montana thunderstorm drops (maybe mixed with a bit of hail?) really pounded my shoulders, even through my Aerostich suit.

    I’d also want hand guards—not because I expect to ride in the woods, but to keep my hands a bit warmer (and electric grips—something I would definitely add—are pretty much useless without hand guards).

    On to the second question: was it fun? Oh, yeah. The Himalayan carries its weight down low and centralized, unlike the KLR, which carries it high and forward. Even though I never got the Himma to do a throttle wheelie, I didn’t really have to worry about lightening up the front end when I hit loose stuff. Unlike the GS, which was bulky and heavy and had to be wrestled everywhere, the Himma is light and compact and seems much more point-and-shoot. As I said earlier, riding the KLR and GS in dirt seemed like a lot of work (and the off-road class I took at last year’s MOA rally did nothing to dispel this notion). In comparison, riding the Himalayan off pavement is play. I will happily give up the GS’s much greater performance (and prestige?) to have a bike that’s about play rather than work. Heck, I’m retired; don’t need my bike to be a job!

    So that’s about it for now. Will I be buying a Himalayan? Seems likely, though I’m still looking at the numbers.

    Meanwhile, home tomorrow to sort through all the pictures and video. The last few days have been interesting. Discovered two fantastic (paved) scenic roads in Utah that I had no idea existed, hiked to one of the most spectacular overlooks around, and added two more dirt roads to my “to be ridden” list. Also saw how a once-gorgeous backroad has been wrecked by suburban sprawl, and been disappointed by a brewery that had been my whole reason for braving the sprawl in the first place. But now it’s time to hit the road.

    If I can find it. How’d it get so foggy out?
    #36
    dsquires16, Cal, td63 and 7 others like this.
  17. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,074
    Location:
    God's country, Western North Carolina
    Fun ride! Thanks for taking us along :beer
    #37
  18. Deflave Sr.

    Deflave Sr. Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2019
    Oddometer:
    143
    Location:
    South Florida
    Scott,

    Great review. Thanks for posting.
    #38
  19. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    185
    Location:
    Ill-Annoy
    Well, I’m back home, so I no longer have the “crappy hotel wi-fi” excuse for not finishing this RR...

    Tuesday: Separate Ways

    My Riding Buddy and I rode twelve miles south from Jackson, then he went left, aiming for Colorado Route 12 and Poudre Canyon, while I went right, down the WY/ID/UT border, planning to reach a motorcycle-themed brewery in Springville.

    It was a lovely mountain morning, not freezing cold as it had been Monday, but cool enough that I had the grips set to “Tropical Paradise.” No gnarly passes, but a pretty enough ride along the Snake River and through some pretty enough mountains.

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    The town of Afton sports what it claims is the biggest antler arch in the West.

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    Maybe. Is it really an arch, though? Fun fact, and a source of comfort for you PETA folks: no elk or deer were harmed to make this arch; they just gather up the antlers when they fall off after mating season.

    On into Idaho...

    B60A5406-86E3-491E-937C-E37ABD1D51EA.jpeg

    ...for all of maybe ten miles. It was here that my ten-year-old, ten-dollar Rummage Sale Special Nikon camera bit the dust, when its motorized zoom lens jammed up. Oh well. Next time I’ll make space for the SLR. Phones and point-and-shoot cameras don’t do justice to this scenery anyway.

    Grabbed a Utah road map in Randolph, as I wanted to confirm that a road I was planning to take was actually paved (Google said yes but my five-year-old state map said gravel, and Google has misled me before), got gas and a to-go sandwich in Evanston, and headed down WY/UT route 150... which turned out to be an absolute delight.

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    A road I’d picked mostly for the shape of its line on the map (my HOG/Rand McNally “Touring Handbook” didn’t even give it the “scenic route” yellow highlight) turned out to be the Mirror Lake Byway, with lots of fun curves, views of the 12-13,000’ Uintah mountains (said to be the only range in the Western Hemisphere that runs east-west instead of north-south), lakes...

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    ...and waterfalls.

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    Plus, next to no traffic, at least not on a Tuesday. There are a lot of Forest Service campgrounds, ATV trailheads, etc., up there, and I wouldn’t be surprised if half of Salt Lake City heads up there on weekends.

    The “next to no traffic” ended at Heber City, as did the fun. Last time I rode US 189 through Provo Canyon (1990? 97?), it was a two lane scenic backroad with a great little turn-off at Bridal Veil Falls. At least, that’s how I remember it. Certainly don’t remember it being that worst of all things, an Urban Expressway, four lanes of angry commuters jockeying for position at 70 mph. I got a glimpse of the falls:

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    ...but decided I’d rather live than try to cross the oncoming lanes to get to the overlook. Sigh...

    The expressway abruptly ended, dropping me into Provo, an endless succession of red lights and construction zones. Eventually I made it to my motel, cooled off in the pool for a while, and then walked over to the “motorcycle-themed brewpub” that was my destination-of-sorts for the day. They had a nice old Harley on display:

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    There was really nothing wrong with the place that a change to (or creative interpretation of) Utah liquor laws couldn’t fix. Unfortunately, they hewed to the Letter Of The Law and served no beer stronger than 4% by volume. Maybe it’s Springville’s proximity to Salt Lake City, because it seems the bars and breweries down in the canyon country have figured out how to serve beer whose strength is appropriate to their style. There’s nothing wrong with “session” beers, if they’re a style that’s naturally low-alcohol. But when you brew a 4% IPA, you’ve got to turn everything else down to keep it in balance. Which made me glad Tuesday was half-price pint night.

    But the antique Harley was pretty, and the sunset (seen from the bridge over I-15) was gorgeous.

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    And Wednesday would be all about the Wide Open Spaces. And, as it turned out, Space itself.
    #39