Good garage hoist

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Andyvh1959, Nov 9, 2019.

  1. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Anyone have experience with a decent reasonably priced 110v or 220v electric hoist for the shop garage? Brands to consider or avoid? Or good deals to search for on craigslist?
    #1
  2. MightyChosen1

    MightyChosen1 I wanna be sedated

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    Hard to beat Ingersol Rand for a small electric hoist . Pricey new but I see them pop up on C/L once in a while . We probably have a hundred small hoist out in the factory IR branded and they hold up pretty well . Air powered is an alternative too but watch out for the older models because parts are becoming scarce for them .

    Not sure I would trust my life to one of the Harbor freight cheapies . A friend of mine was lifting a truck bed of about 400 Lbs. last week with a brand new HF " 8 ton" come along. It broke a tooth while suspended about 2 feet in the air , fell about a foot , then caught right before it hit the ground. It was a little scary .

    How much weight are you planning on lifting?
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  3. moparmiller

    moparmiller Been here awhile

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    CM is a good hoist for a used rig. I don't trust any Chinese rigging gear- slings, shackles, chain buy US made for good quality control and known metallurgy.
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  4. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    I agree on not using any Chinese product for lifting loads. My 5x10 tilt bed trailer weighs about 700lbs. I may use a hoist to lift the trailer and store it above the garage door.
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  5. ABHooligan

    ABHooligan The Flying Mythos

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    Can your ceiling joists support that much weight, for that long?
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  6. cresmond

    cresmond Adventurer

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    I have an HF one. It works well when needed.
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  7. cagiva549

    cagiva549 whats a cagiva

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    I wouldn’t touch electric for a garage hoist unless you were loading and unloading trucks all day , for lifting motors in and out electric is way to jerky , not enough or too much . A chain fall is precision control . Hydraulic is better than electric If you just have to have power lift . My garage hoist is a fork lift , easily moved around wherever it needs to be .
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  8. mitchntx

    mitchntx Visit The wick in Seattle

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    I had a 800lb HF electric hoist in my previous shop.
    Did everything I asked it to do.
    I do agree that the starting and stopping was not smooth. The nylon sling would stretch and the load bounce.
    Lifting a V8 motor was sketchy at times.

    For the new place I opted for a chainfall.
    Not because of the issues outlined above, but the lack of power to run the hoist and the logistics of routing said power as the trolley traverses the width.
    A chain fall is just as fast lifting and lowering, takes little effort and is just as versatile.
    The trolley was $60 and the chainfall was $80 from Amazon.


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  9. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    I use a Chinese HF chain-fall hoist 1.5 tons that has hung from a beam on back of my sawmill shed for like 20 years. Used to turn large logs using a nylon sling. It is weather exposed, under a roof and yet you can use it whenever needed. I'll question why OP needs electric? Manual works pretty good?
    In my e.g., cheap is best.
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  10. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    when at the local HF the pick a parts -salvage parts, was buying several HF chain hoists, commented that the liability wouldnt cover the electric.
    I have lifted several engine-trans -(fwd) small units with a come along, fitting up a beam across the single car garage with its own uprights.
    #10
  11. gmiguy

    gmiguy You rode a what to where?

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    I'm very sure that I wouldn't trust a person's life to any hoist that is not rated for safety-critical use, regardless of the manufacturer or purchase price.

    Ingersoll Rand seems to agree, and says on the first page of their electric hoist safety manual:
    If a person is using any of these things in such a way that somebody gets killed if it fails then they're doing it very wrong.

    Regarding the original question I submit that a manual chainfall is probably a better choice for most home garages, unless the application is very frequent or the user has physical limitations that prevent them from using one.
    #11
  12. jasiu

    jasiu Been here awhile Supporter

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    I opted for Big Blue bike lift, it is perfect for my needs. The beauty of this lift is the small size and can be easily moved around garage. In addition, work very well when I put bike away for the winter. I just lift bike couple inches above the ground and let sit like this for entire winter. Very stable and easy to use, came with "J" hooks which allow me to grab bike frame to further stabilize it.
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  13. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    Bike lift I have already, a professional Handy lift. I also have an old chain block & tackle that is rated for one ton. So that is an option for lifting also, though slow.

    The trailer weight load, if I decide to lift/store it above the garage door level, is not an issue or holding the weight over time, that is basically a "one" duty cycle factor. Its a slow lift so that is also a low duty cycle. Once up the weight is up it is stationary, and constant. The trailer load does have to be factored in with the potential snow load per square inch, for the rated load of the trusses. Some additional bracing or load cables attached to the trusses could distribute the load better.

    Or I got the easier route of storing my trailer stood up on end at the back of the garage. It's a 5x10 flat bed with an angle iron frame, that could be stood one end.


    That I can do with my block and tackle, or get a wall mounted electric winch. The snowmobile will get winched onto a slanted storage platform against the side wall, and then the platform gets levered up to the stored position so some of my bikes can be parked underneath the snowmobile platform.
    #13