Goodbye Cruiserface, Hello Happyface: The (old) Long and (new) Short Of It All

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by popscycle, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Why Our Day Trip Didn't Happen: Aside from being from rainy and cool, a bevy of builders showed up yesterday and blocked the redhead's egress.

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    After over a month of permit, personnel and weather delays, the carriage house got a start yesterday when they poured the footings.

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    We're hoping the foundation will be in by this time next week and aiming for an estimated completion date in Feb. The logistics of this (i.e., selecting/scheduling appliances, cabinets, windows, doors, fixtures, etc.) is taking major bites out of riding time, not to mention the retirement budget. It's worth it, though, given the opportunity to be with family and close to work.
    bluestar, B10Dave, black 8 and 4 others like this.
  2. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Bad Battery Behavior: We were raring to go this morning. I fired up the bike to head into to NH and VT. After stopping at a gas station several towns north to top off the tank, the redhead threw a fit and refused to start. It would turn over once or twice and then quit. I had seen this several other times but didn't think to much about since it would start after sitting a few minutes. This morning it was more like 15 minutes and I am thinking it's time to use my MOA membership. After talking to a guy about bikes for some time, the bike managed to start - barely. Now , it dawns on me that perhaps there's weak or dead cell and that it's time for a new battery. The one in the bike is going on 5 years. So, I got smart, cut short the ride and headed for the nearest dealer, which was fortunately not too far away. I pulled in, just as a band of Indians was pulling out on a group ride. They were riding and I was wasting a beautiful morning sitting in a dealer (iPhone photo below).

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    They got me in, ran all the checks and found nothing wrong other than a very small decrease in battery voltage. I asked if there was a bad or weak cell and the wrench said he did not have a machine capable of telling. I told them to just replace the battery, which they eventually did. After that, the bike fired up immediately every time. I figured it was cured and rode up through southern NH and VT with nary a hiccup. The problem was the battery. Thinking back, the Goldwings used to go through a battery every year, with failure usually following summer. Lesson learned. At the first sign of lazy or recalcitrant starting when kept charged, get thee to a new battery.
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  3. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

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    John; did you go with a lithium battery? I have one in my bike and really like it's performance.
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  4. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Condemned To Slow Death? The condemned building you see below is the 1843 Mechanics Hall located at coordinates 42.475749, -71.842689. The structure got its name when used as a gathering place by mill workers in the mechanics union. Before that, though, the building began as the village school, rebuilt from timbers from an earlier school. The mills in the small village are long gone and the hall has set empty since the 1970s.

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    Many of these old buildings, be they halls or mills, have a strange habit of catching fire and burning to the ground. Local historical groups are have been trying to save and restore this one. So far, they've not been very successful at restoration.
    bluestar, B10Dave, KMichael and 2 others like this.
  5. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Just wanting to get back on the road, I told them to just put in a replacement. Since they didn't bring up the subject of type/model, I suspect it was not lithium. Starting is, though, quite an improvement - nearly instantaneous. If this battery's life is a good as the last one, I will officially be a really old fart and probably sufficiently forgetful to ask about types next time, too. :D
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  6. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Early Fall Street Scene: Taken this weekend in Warwick, MA as I was heading north into NH.

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    This is a favorite stop, hydrate and stretch spot on Hotel Rd. Since the building below is the only property facing the road, I have always assumed it was once a hotel.

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    This village has a good number of structures that date back into the 1700s. The building above may be one of those.
    KMichael, B10Dave, Shaggie and 4 others like this.
  7. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Lurking Turkeys Anew. We had them hanging around our last place and it seems they'll be part of the new one. This particular rafter of turkeys (a.k.a. a gaggle, a flock, etc.) consists of about a dozen birds that show up for breakfast and dinner.

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    Other critters out back are deer, coyotes, some free range chickens and a very large raptor. A neighbor's dog seems to do a good job of protecting the chickens, as only a few are lost each year.
  8. MarkVeeMarkADV

    MarkVeeMarkADV sharing misinformation and useless trivia

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    actually, the Inn built in 1827 by Samuel Fay was a stagecoach stop with horse shed;
    later on the addition on the north side, built by Fay also, was a great hall on the 2nd floor (21x60 ft) for
    gatherings,church services,(and town meetings before the town hal was constructed)

    In 1974,my first legal beer was HERE.

    Thank you for the pictures you take-
    Mark.
    popscycle likes this.
  9. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    A Bridge As An Old Friend: The Ashuelot Covered Bridge (ca. 1865) is like an old friend that I visit at least once a year when heading up into VT or NH. It is one of the region's few remaining 19th century covered bridges, as most have been removed or replaced, sometimes with an completely new covered bridge.

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    Being a double-span, lattice truss bridge, it boasts two walkways. The bridge rests on stone abutments and a central pier that has been updated to protect from scouring (the water flow under the bridge can be quite rapid). Unlike many covered bridges, the sides are open and less protective of the roadbed. Back in the day, horse and buggies didn't handle well on icy bridges, which was the reason they were covered.

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    I generally ride through the Ashuelot bridge, go back and ride thought it again to make sure I've gotten all of the bridge's good vibrations. If you like bridges, this one will make you happy. It is located at coordinates 42.777117, -72.423335.
  10. Toadady

    Toadady Push'n parts Supporter

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    Follow the race to rebuild the Old Blenheim Bridge in New York State, an icon of 19th century American engineering, destroyed by Hurricane Irene in 2011. Watch a team of elite craftsmen faithfully reproduce the massive, intricate wooden structure under grueling time pressure as flooding threatens their worksite. In China, witness craftsmen restoring thousand-year-old covered bridges based on ingenious frameworks of woven timber beams. Discover how Chinese artisans are keeping traditional skills alive to ensure the survival of these stunning ancient structures.
    panzer and popscycle like this.
  11. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Great link, thanks! You have to appreciate the old world craftsmanship that went into these bridges. As the video suggested, there were a good number of covered bridges destroyed by Irene. One that stands out was the Quechee Bridge, which was in ruins after the storm. As the main link into the village, it was the path you took to the Simon Pearce Glassworks and Restaurant (a favorite place to visit). It was fully rebuilt when we went there in Sept. 2015. Shown below, the new Quechee bridge, unlike the the Blenheim, appears to be just a modern steel and concrete bridge with a wooden, covered-bridge type canopy.

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    A video of the not-that-old bridge (1970 rebuild) being torn apart by Irene is below.

  12. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Move The Motorcycle Or Suffer The Pangs Of Not Riding: It was a good/bad news thing. The bad news was that I am a little older, slower and late to the party. The builders again beat me to the punch and had a concrete pumper truck in place before I had time to make coffee or get the bike out. After pouring footings they were back to install forms and pour the full foundation by the time I was fully awake. That was the good news.

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    Knowing they might come early to take the forms off, I did manage to free the bike in the wee hours of yesterday morning and get out for a ride. When I returned in the afternoon, voila - we had a foundation.

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    We will soon have enough total garage and work space to accommodate all the local cars plus a possible 4th motorcycle, should one ever mysteriously appear to assuage both my tired butt and Kevin's yearnings. This is, after all, a joint operation to which motorcycles bring some sanity.
    B10Dave, Shaggie, KMichael and 4 others like this.
  13. Toadady

    Toadady Push'n parts Supporter

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    that squared of vault looking place on the far end looks like the beginning of a gun safe,
    panzer and popscycle like this.
  14. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Yea, it's too small for the tank I want that Lynne won't let me have and that I can't afford anyway. Not being deterred, though, I will be off bright and early tomorrow to look at tanks. Pictures will follow.
  15. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Train Images Of Late: Below are the bulk of the train chasing activities over the last week or so. Due to construction-related tasks, the redhead didn't wander too far and, as a result, didn't score much either.

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  16. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    When The Destination Is Better Than The Journey: Few destinations beat the enjoyment of the ride; however, today's did. This morning was the Collings Foundation's opening salvo in the "Battle For The Airfield", a WWII reenactment of the allied battle for the airfield outside Aachen Germany. Opening at 8:30, we got there just before 9 and parked up near the hanger. The place was already jamming up.

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    The reenactment wasn't the only attraction, there was also the aircraft hanger (i.e. the building to the right above) and the "soft opening" of the American Heritage Museum shown in the background. Not yet totally completed, the museum contains the best of the Jacques Littlefield's tank collection and Collings military memorabilia. A teaser is below.

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    IMHO, this is a world-class military history museum. Also fun was seeing reenactors fire a real German 88 KwK at some American tanks. Pics to follow (I took nearly 200. It was that good).
    tjzondrz, KMichael, Deckyon and 7 others like this.
  17. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Road Balm: Gravel. It soothes the mind and spirit. Before delving into the plethora of yesterday's military stuff pics, here are some shots from a very relaxing ride a few days earlier.

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    Can you be happy riding up and down gravel roads? Well, yes you can.

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    The ride is especially entertaining when there's a lot of very loose gravel on uphill turns and switchbacks or in the low wet areas when you have both loose gravel and slime.

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    All in all, it's just lovely if the rocks aren't too big, the pot holes too deep or the road too slimy.
    zookster, Shaggie, KMichael and 6 others like this.
  18. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    AHM Ride, Part 1: Over the weekend, the redhead and I went to the Battle For The Airfields WWII Reenactment. We didn't go for that event, though. Rather, we went because allied with the event was the first, soft opening of the American Heritage Museum (AHM). Nearing completion, the museum was really the star attraction for us and we arrived shortly after the event opened at 8:30. We were the first motorcycle there; however, a half hour later (when the pic below was taken) the Collings Foundation's substantial property was getting jammed up. In the foreground to the right is the Foundation's large hanger with a Shaker round barn facia. In the background is the new museum, which, like the hanger, is much bigger than it looks.

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    The museum's "soft opening" was very controlled with groups of 50 going in at 12 to 15 minute intervals. First up was a 12 minute movie on U.S. military history that was, IMHO, exceptionally well done and quite patriotic. Following the movie was a dynamic WWI diorama depicting trench warfare. Below is a low light level shot of part of that exhibit. The diorama was animated and noisy, as it attempted to give you a limited idea of what life in the trenches was like.

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    The diorama exit leads you out into the museum proper onto the upper mezzanine level where the first thing you encounter is a rare WWII Mercedes-Benz W31-G4 staff/command car.

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    Walking beyond the staff car takes you out onto the mezzanine overlooking the various exhibits, which are getting closer to completion but clearly not finished.

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    More to follow, noting there are now a select few of us riders who can say we took a day trip to see a Scud Missile.
  19. Deckyon

    Deckyon The Raven

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    Can't wait to see the rest!
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  20. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    AHM Ride, Part 2: Last weekend, the redhead and I went to the Battle For The Airfields WWII Reenactment. Coincident was the "soft opening" of the Collings Foundation American Heritage Museum (AHM). The AHM was the main reason for the ride. After waiting in line, sitting through the intro movie and diorama, I came out onto the mezzanine overlooking the exhibits. Amid all the tanks, planes and memorabilia down on the main floor was this rocket.

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    A trip down to the main floor for a better shot was in order. It was down there that I learned this was a Scud B, never having been up close and personal with one.

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    The Scud missile and launcher was originally part of the Littlefield collection that was bought out by Collings.

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    I tried to find someone who knew where it originated from, pre-Littlefield. Nobody knew and nary a decent docent was to be found. In all fairness, it was a soft opening. Later, I learned the launch vehicle carrying the rocket was a MAZ-543.

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    Some 7,000 of these Scud-B rockets were produced starting in the 1960s with many variants produced by other countries in the Soviet bloc or clients of Russia. I am guessing this one came from the Middle East, with Scuds having played a role in the Gulf War.

    More to follow.
    tjzondrz, zookster, Deckyon and 7 others like this.