Goodbye Cruiserface, Hello Happyface: The (old) Long and (new) Short Of It All

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by popscycle, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. Ccieurzo

    Ccieurzo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    142
    Location:
    Cornfields of the Midwest
    3344D0E5-42DE-4040-9FDD-7AB4DAE51B62.jpeg
    Thanks for this awesome thread. It keeps this displaced New Englander happy. Here’s some payback for the entertainment. 4014 underway at Castle Rock, UT.
    TM1(SS), CamoColton, zookster and 4 others like this.
  2. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    Thank you for helping to keep this thread interesting with a great 4014 pic!
    TM1(SS) and Ccieurzo like this.
  3. Ccieurzo

    Ccieurzo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    142
    Location:
    Cornfields of the Midwest
    5E1B5646-A165-4071-A46D-82504885AD59.jpeg
    My pleasure. Here’s another pic.
    TM1(SS), zookster, B10Dave and 4 others like this.
  4. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    The Pressure Washer Works As You Would Expect: Below is the bike before it was washed but after it had been hosed down and then left to dry. The ass end of the redhead was still dirty all the way up to and including the tripod. There was a good bit of caked mud up underneath the fenders that the earlier hose down couldn't budge.

    [​IMG]

    After a few minutes with the pressure washer, all of that crud was gone.

    [​IMG]

    I did not use soap this time nor did I do anything other than a quick going-over and wipe-down, giving sensitive areas (i.e., seals, bearings, electrical, etc.) less pressure by moving the wand farther back/away. Having gotten her quickly cleaned up, there was still time to ride into Worcester for her annual inspection. Annual inspections with this girl are a breeze - never any problem. Back in the cruiser years, it seemed as if something was always amiss, which may be a major factor for that cruiserface look (i.e., grimace, consternation, constipation, etc.).
    Shaggie, TM1(SS), zookster and 6 others like this.
  5. panzer

    panzer The Mountains Are Calling And I Must Go Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    592
    Location:
    lake ontario coastline, new york
    My servo brakes used to cause me whatever consternation is in Germany.
    popscycle likes this.
  6. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    I remember an eventful $600 (or more) worth of Bestürzung when the potamus' fork seals suddenly opted to lube up the front brake rotor. Somewhat less irritating was the time one of the light switches decided it didn't like person conducting the inspection check.
    TM1(SS), B10Dave and panzer like this.
  7. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    Just a quick note - the pressure washer worked fine on the rag top Miata. I used the soap dispenser to thoroughly cover the car (it looked like it had been whitewashed) than pressure washed it all off, taking care to put additional distance between the washer wand and the ragtop. That said, the pressure got the soap and dirt out of the fabric and it's cleaner than I can remember. Bottom Line: So far soo good.
  8. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    ADVenture Du Jour: As is the mostly case on these (very) rare days when the sun shines, my adventures don't get much farther than the driveway. With really, really nice weather this morning, the upstairs carpet showed up, was carried up and installed. Once that was settled in, the remainder of the morning was punctuated by the arrival of the kitchen cabinets, as shown below (iphone photo).

    [​IMG]

    With all the cabinets and materials inventoried and moved inside, the afternoon was looking very promising. I went in for lunch and then upstairs to check the email and found the ornamental railing folks wanted to install this afternoon while the weather was good rather than (scheduled) tomorrow. That meant waiting around for them to come, answer questions (e.g. where is the water and electricity for the diamond drill) and then pay them when done.

    [​IMG]

    By the time the iron folks had the railing installed, it was late afternoon with no time to go anywhere. That's OK, though, as we're now seeing major progress on the carriage house.
    black 8, Shaggie, zookster and 3 others like this.
  9. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    Great ADV Day: The redhead and I got up and out into the early morning sun today. Temps were in the high 50s starting out and warmed up into the 70s later, making this a picture perfect day.

    [​IMG]

    We headed west to take in the Old Newgate Prison and mine (which opened this month) by way of CT 190 and assorted back roads. I did stop in Stafford Springs long enough enroute to hydrate and take some pics, one of which is shown below.

    [​IMG]

    I did get pics of the spring(s) and will post them later. Also, there's some good pics of Newgate prison and mine. Will get those up soon. Now, though, it's time for a cold beer and a sandwich. I am feeling pretty good about doing a 275 mile day with only a modicum of hurt (at my advanced age). Advil and Rox Risers can make a difference. Things are looking up.
    zookster, black 8, KMichael and 5 others like this.
  10. Shaggie

    Shaggie Unseen University Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,892
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    @popscycle they are nice riding temps!!

    Btw, did you see I tagged you and @B10Dave over in my Tiki thread?

    Best wishes

    Shane
    B10Dave and popscycle like this.
  11. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    In Search Of Those Springs: As I mentioned in the previous post, I rode through Stafford Springs CT on the way to the Old Newgate Prison and Mine. Stafford Springs, shown below in a pic from last year, is of some historical note as it became one of this country's first "health spas" due to the natural mineral springs. The springs first gained attention when it was noted that the Nipmuck tribe 'took the waters' because it gave them energy. Later in the 1700s, colonists, including John Adams, would travel to the springs to take the cure (i.e., for gout, arthritis or whatever ailed you at the time).

    [​IMG]

    Above is an Episcopal church on the left and with the town's historical society building on the right. The springs were reported to be between the two buildings, so I rode across the river and parked the bike behind the two buildings.

    [​IMG]

    Looking up between the church and historical society building, all I could see was what looked like a capped well, also known as a well house.

    [​IMG]

    On closer inspection there are adjacent concrete steps leading down to a small pool fed by a small gurgle of water coming out of a pipe.

    [​IMG]

    Apparently, the history of Stafford Springs as the nation's first health spa has been documented by several authors, including Cleveland Amory, who, in his book ''Last Resorts,'' writes of the village's holding ''the honor of being the first recognized society resort in the country.'' The town's mineral spring led to the founding of the Stafford Gingerale Company in 1900, which bottled and sold the mineral water. I read that a decades old analysis of the water showed it contained iron, sodium, magnesium, bicarbonate of soda and lime.

    I am not sure what I expected the spring to look like, but whatever it was, this wasn't it. If you wish to see the springs, it is at coordinates 41.952726, -72.304699.
    zookster, black 8, Shaggie and 4 others like this.
  12. panzer

    panzer The Mountains Are Calling And I Must Go Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    592
    Location:
    lake ontario coastline, new york
    Did you give some H20 to the Redhead?
    popscycle likes this.
  13. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    An Interesting Old Tavern Of Some Repute: Below is a pic of Viets' Tavern, the first known reference of which is 1712 when Dr. John Viets was granted a license by the town of Turkey Hill (Now E. Granby, CT) to "keep a house of public entertainment."

    [​IMG]

    The tavern is just across the road from Old Newgate Prison, which will be the subject of an upcoming post or two. Dr. John's son John, who also had a tavernkeeper's license, both ran the tavern and served as warden of the prison for a period of time. When John died of smallpox in 1777, his son Luke took over and ran the inn until 1834. It is said that the tavern was a very popular place during the prison's active years, both with visitors, travelers and even some convicts.

    Viets' Tavern is located at coordinates 41.961882, -72.744538.
    B10Dave, KMichael, zookster and 4 others like this.
  14. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    When A Copper Mine Became A Prison: A long-standing item on the redhead's dance card was a ride to E. Granby, CT, to explore the Old Newgate Mine and Prison, which had been closed for many years. Now open, we made it there on a picture-perfect riding day.

    [​IMG]

    Old Newgate Prison began life as a copper mine that first operated from 1707 to 1773. The mine was created by digging a vertical shaft and tunneling horizontally, with additional vertical shafts dug for ventilation. When mining operations ceased in 1773, some colonials thought the mine would be a great place to hold prisoners, whoever they might be. This was what we really wanted to see so we paid our $6 senior citizen fee at the visitor center, shown below.

    [​IMG]

    The lady at the desk was very pleasant, informative and helpful, giving me a place to store my helmet while visiting. She did think keeping the helmet might be a good idea given the low height of the ceiling in some places of the mine. I thanked her, left the helmet (Who wants to walk around with a helmet on such a perfect day) and went through into the prison yard, shown below.

    [​IMG]

    Walking into the yard, I encountered a staff member leaning on wall remnants of what was once the prison's nail shop. I knew that because the nice lady in the visitor center gave me a map of the place, shown below.

    [​IMG]

    Area 11 was the prison nail shop, of which not much is left to see other than a partial wall. Of much greater interest was area 12, TBD in a following post. More to follow.
    black 8, B10Dave, Shaggie and 4 others like this.
  15. Toadady

    Toadady Push'n parts Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Oddometer:
    6,253
    Location:
    Southern Missouri
    They didn't mistake you for an escaped prisoner ?
    popscycle likes this.
  16. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    I think seeing an old fart dressed in motorcycle gear but not looking like a pirate, carrying a camera and poking around while eschewing docents had them confused.
    zookster likes this.
  17. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    Train Fix With A Double Take: Just a brief interruption of mine/prison adventure to note I got a long-needed train fix on that ride. Thinking Pam Am had rid itself of its GPs, I saw what I though was a blue GP sitting. On closer inspection, though, the blue thing was one of the older, rebuilt, ex-CSX Dash-8s (B20-8) that had been given PA blue livery since last seen.

    [​IMG]

    I wonder if they have painted or will paint any of the newer Dash 8s (e.g. B40s), such as the one behind. Such questions don't rise to the level of foaming but are the spice of chasing trains.
  18. panzer

    panzer The Mountains Are Calling And I Must Go Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    592
    Location:
    lake ontario coastline, new york
    Would one be a foamer if you painted your bike in the Pan Am color scheme?
    zookster and popscycle like this.
  19. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    LOL! In the realm of 'necessary vs. sufficient', I don't think a paint scheme rises to the level of sufficient. I am told that to be a true foamer, a rail fan must, when a train is within sight, display some level of over the top excitement, whether it be wild gestures, pissing your pants, shrieking like a teenage girl and/or some other emotional display like trying to hug the locomotive. :D

    Edit Note: I think it is about time for a spring pilgrimage to the haunted Hoosac Tunnel and toast the spirits of the dead tunnelers with a bottle of Hoosac hooch.
  20. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    7,992
    Location:
    Central MA
    Ding Dong Bell, Prisoner's In The Well: In December 2, 1773, the colonial legislature approached landowner and tavern keeper John Viets about a new opportunity - becoming warden of the newly-minted Simsbury prison across the road. The old copper mine across the road had supposedly been made both easily manageable and escape-proof. This was done by capping the main mine shaft with a heavy grill, and building a guardhouse over it. Also, various other drains and passages were closed so as to make escape from the mine impossible. For just a mere $375 expenditure, the colony had an impregnable prison/jail that was nothing more than a dark, dank mine cavern that was accessible via a 40 ft. ladder. Prisoners were to be kept in the mine at night.

    Some days later the legislature had turned the prison over to John Viets, he was given his first prisoner - one John Hinson. Hinson was a glib, fast-talking con man's con man who had done time in various jails for theft, impersonation, violation of CT's blue laws and other misdeeds and misdemeanors. All was well with the new prisoner until the night of December 22, when Hinson simply disappeared from the depths of the mine. His was just the first of many departures from the impregnable jail. Prisoners disappeared from the prison mine almost as fast as they went in. It was eventually discovered that Hinson escaped up through the well, shown below, with the help of his mistress, who snuck onto the prison grounds and lowered a rope down the well into the mine.

    [​IMG]

    The prison's well was a pool of water down in the old mine. The well was also a conduit for a number of escapes before it was figured out that people outside the prison were helping their friends, relatives and lovers escape the mine by way of the well. The prison didn't have many guards and they weren't quick to figure out that simply removing the well rope did not prevent escapes through the well.

    To prevent well escapes from happening again, large stones were cemented over the well shaft with iron grating covering most of the opening. Other securing works were undertaken; however, between 1773 and 1775. virtually every prisoner confined to the mines had managed to escape. News of the horrors of the mine also became public knowledge and the prison got the name "Newgate" after England's most formidable prison.

    In 1827, on the night before all remaining Newgate prisoners were to be transferred out to the penitentiary in Wethersfield, one Able Starkey bribed a guard to lower a rope and water bucket down into the mine. Starkey then tried to climb hand over hand to the now open top but the old rope broke and Starkey plunged to his death. It was the prison's last escape attempt.
    B10Dave, KMichael, zookster and 3 others like this.