Goodbye Cruiserface, Hello Happyface: The (old) Long and (new) Short Of It All

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by popscycle, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Naked Aviation Porn 17: Having taken so many plane pics on various rides, I thought it might be interesting to show some of these in their 'naked state' - that is, with surrounding and background clutter removed so the plane or part of the plane becomes the sole object of attention. The 17th of these is the Doublas C47, which was the military cargo variant of the DC3. Over 10,000 of these were produced in the 1940s.

    [​IMG]

    Finding and masking these images is a not-unpleasant, human-distancing pastime when factors (e.g., cold wet windy weather, people sneeze and cough, laziness, etc.) limit your riding. We hope folks who like planes enjoy seeing these masked images.
    KMichael, NxtGoRnd, Shaggie and 5 others like this.
  2. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    The Meetinghouse Was The Church Was The Meetinghouse: It's no secret. I like old New England church buildings. They were once the social, religious and administrative centers of the town or village. It was inside these structures that the early fabric of this country was woven. Over the past decade, I have taken many pictures of these structures, many of which date back to before the country's founding. Below are three more of the better-maintained church buildings that I rode in the past week.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It goes without saying that parishioners have upgraded these buildings over the years by adding extensions and constructing newer/taller steeples.
    KMichael, NxtGoRnd, Shaggie and 5 others like this.
  3. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Complex Virus + Complex Storm = Crap Riding Conditions: It wasn't bad enough that the virus closed things down and made some people stupid/crazy. A complex weather system parked its wobbly ass off the eastern seaboard. The system is warm in the center and rainy cold on the periphery (i.e., over us here). It did stop for a few minutes yesterday afternoon so I could walk out across the street to the mailbox and then check on the steeds in the garage.

    [​IMG]

    For a brief moment, I had the urge to throw on the togs and take a short ride but low 40s temps and the rising damp in the old bones sent me back inside to the comfy chair in front of the fireplace I'm most grateful for.
  4. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,216
    Location:
    Kingsmill Corner Ont.
    Hi John. Low sixties here today. Spent a couple of hours putting some break in miles on this.
    Int650 001.jpg
    KMichael, AdvNuma, zookster and 8 others like this.
  5. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Sweet looking ride, Dave. Is the Interceptor an addition to your stable or a replacement?
  6. black 8

    black 8 motographer

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2016
    Oddometer:
    3,800
    Location:
    33.202738 -117.384040
    :thumb
    B10Dave and popscycle like this.
  7. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Scenes From The Road: The redhead and I got out for a short bit this afternoon. Below are a few pics taken along the way at my hydration and/or stretch stops. The first is looking across a town common.

    [​IMG]

    Just across the street from another town common is this old manse, which is a favorite of mine.

    [​IMG]

    Just across the street from an old village church is this old house, which looks to be a well-kept, late 1600s or early 1700s colonial.

    [​IMG]

    Aside from town commons, old houses and mills, we have a lot of these - apple orchards. Johnny Appleseed, who was born in this area as John Chapman, left his mark. The apple trees could blossom as early as late this month, depending on the weather, but will boom in May for sure.

    [​IMG]

    These orchards make us think ahead to those wonderful "Wrapple" pastries that come with the fall apple harvest (but from a special orchard). As previously posted, the "Wrapple" is like cinnamon apple pie rolled up in a flaky pastry covered in delicious frosting.

    [​IMG]

    More to follow. I accidentally caught a train moving.
    KMichael, AdvNuma, NxtGoRnd and 11 others like this.
  8. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,216
    Location:
    Kingsmill Corner Ont.
    John; it will replace the F650GS. I will sell or trade that one for an airhead BMW; preferably an R65. I have had my fun on the GS and it is getting well on in the mileage department. I love the older airheads and want another. My last one was a R100T 1980.
  9. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Thanks and please don't skimp on pictures of that airhead.
    black 8 and klaviator like this.
  10. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    983
    Location:
    Central CT
    I love my R65! My father bought it brand new from the dealer in 1980.

    IMG_0251.jpg
  11. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Lunch At The Hoosac: Knowing there had been a cave-in in the Hoosac tunnel, I had the feeling that something might be going on there. I took a 2.5 hour ride (100 milesl) to get there via the Mohawk trail to have lunch and see what was happening. I wasn't disappointed. There was lots of things I'd never seen before parked in and around the tunnel. A few were up near the mouth, as shown below.

    [​IMG]

    I should have gotten there earlier and packed more food. More to follow on this story when I get pics converted.
  12. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    At The Wrong Place At The Right Time: It was pure happenstance. Having been fenced out of a favored train watching spot, I was checking out another further up the line. It was at a point where two, two-track lines (i.e., Pan Am and MBTA) converged into one two-track line. I had checked out the inside of the vee and was working my way down the outside.

    [​IMG]

    I had gone to the MBTA side just up the track a bit from the vee to check the view when I heard a train whistle. Thinking it had to be the MBTA, since moving PA trains were few and far between if they existed at all, I got off on the MBTA side to get the pic. Unfortunately it was a Pan Am coal train with three power units pulling a string of empties. I did take a pic of the lead.

    [​IMG]

    As the result of all this, though, I did find the good spot at the point of the vee on the MBTA side.
    KMichael, GAS GUY, klaviator and 4 others like this.
  13. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Lunch At The Hoosac Part 1 - Getting Out Of Town: Knowing there had been a cave-in in the Hoosac tunnel, I had the lingering feeling that something was going on there and I should see what it was. Curiosity and good weather overcame housebound comfort and laziness on Monday and I took a 2.5 hour ride (100 milesl) to get there via the Mohawk Trail (i.e., Rt 2). The idea was to have lunch and see what was happening. The first hurdle was getting up, getting ready and getting out of town

    [​IMG]

    Getting out the door meant getting the redhead up and out, packing a lunch, stowing the camera, doing a quick pre-flight of the bike and heading off sometime after 9 AM. Temps were in the high 40s, looking to hit mid 50s. Not wearing a watch, time checks are made using clocks in towns I pass through, looking at the instrument panel, Nav or iPhone. By around 9:30, we were well underway with the prospect of hitting the tunnel around noon.

    [​IMG]

    Monday mornings would usually see bustling traffic but the roads were mostly empty - bad for the economy and people's livelihoods but good for the rider and ride. Nary a car was in sight as I rounded the reservoir making tracks north to the Mohawk Trail.

    [​IMG]

    There aren't many tourist traps left on Rt 2 (i.e., the Trail) but the place below seemed to have a steady draw. Seeing it devoid of cars was a little weird.

    [​IMG]

    With minimal traffic on this usually-busy road, we got ahead of schedule, accumulating spare time to stop, stretch and grab a pic. As you know, trails tended to follow rivers and this one is no exception. The river was full and moving fast - perhaps too fast for the usual assemblage of fly fishermen in waders seen along here following the April 1 opening of fishing season on this river.

    [​IMG]

    More to follow in Part 2 - "Into The Hills".
    KMichael, GAS GUY, klaviator and 9 others like this.
  14. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Lunch At The Hoosac Part 2 - Into The Hills: Knowing there had been a cave-in in the Hoosac tunnel, I had the lingering feeling that something was going on there and I should see what it was. Curiosity and good weather overcame housebound comfort and laziness on Monday and I took a 2.5 hour ride (100 milesl) to get there via the Mohawk Trail (i.e., Rt 2). The idea was to have lunch and see what was happening. There was no dilly-dallying around. We went up to Rt 2 (i.e., the Mohawk Trail) and headed west until hitting Zoar Road in Charlemont.

    [​IMG]

    The road is quite good until it passes under the RR tracks just before Zoar Park. You might want to get up off your butt on this short stretch of crap road, which now becomes River Road. This part of the road would make a great train shot should a train ever happened along.

    [​IMG]

    Zoar Park in the spring, summer and fall months is where the kayakers, tubers, floaters and rafters hang out when they're not in the Deerfield River.

    [​IMG]

    Once past the park above, the ride and road to the tunnel is quite good, especially out of season where there's little river traffic. There are a plethora of places to pull off along the river.

    [​IMG]

    River Road does as it name implies - follow the Deerfield River all the way to the Hoosac Tunnel and beyond. It is good for some happyface, spirited (but not stupid) riding with a good number of sweepers and elevation changes. During summer months, though, you have to watch out for the floaters whose minds are more on getting into the river than driving. This trip, we didn't see a single car or motorcycle on the road. There were two riders at the tunnel.

    [​IMG]

    More to follow in the final Part 3 - "Strange Things At The Tunnel".
  15. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Lunch At The Hoosac Part 3 - Strange Things At The Tunnel: Knowing there had been a cave-in in the Hoosac tunnel, I had the lingering feeling that something was going on there and I should see what it was. Curiosity and good weather overcame housebound comfort and laziness on Monday and I took a 2.5 hour ride (100 milesl) to get there via the Mohawk Trail (i.e., Rt 2). The idea was to have lunch and see what was happening. Once there, I saw stuff I'd never seen before, up near the tunnel entrance, as shown below, and all around the periphery. The porta-potty tells you it's a formal work site.

    [​IMG]

    Although I didn't get pics of them, there were a bunch of workers and trucks up near the road. I rode thru like I was one of them and parked half way between the memorial and some strange lean-to.

    [​IMG]

    By the time I got off the bike and snapped the picture above, everyone had left except one worker and two riders who were down at the mouth of the tunnel. As I rode up, the worker girl was walking down to the tunnel entrance to chase them out.

    [​IMG]

    I went back to the bike to see about lunch and get a better look at the lean-to.

    [​IMG]

    The lean-to had lots of steel railroad things hanging about. What was that all about?

    [​IMG]

    On the other side of the track was a bunch of bundles of "Spec Mix" that I assume was being used in some way to patch the unlined tunnel.

    [​IMG]

    Seeing all that concrete/mortar mix made me wonder how it was being used or applied in a tunnel whose ceiling and walls were mostly jaggedy rock - something to contemplate while eating lunch. Of course, I had to wander across and look at it. Happily, the girl worker didn't chase me off before she left.

    [​IMG]

    There was also a rock drill nearby. I read somewhere they were drilling test bores in the ceiling and walls to check for instability.

    [​IMG]

    Having looked things over and taking photos, I went back to the bike to eat lunch and think about all of this. I was wishing I had gotten here when they were working; however, they'd have probably shooed me off and out of the portal yard.

    [​IMG]

    I finished in time to hear the two crotch-rockets fire up and buzz off down river road.

    [​IMG]

    Taking a quick look around again and wishing for a train, I followed the two riders some minutes later. The next day I read the tunnel had been reopened two days earlier for the first train. Even if nothing had been there or happened, the ride itself was worth it. All of the stuff at the tunnel was just a bonus.
  16. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    The Redhead Went To Harvard: That would be the town, not the university, where she stopped by the type of places where she likes to pose - old historical society buildings. This one was once a Baptist Church dating back to the early 1800. Unfortunately, the covid brouhaha has closed such places.

    [​IMG]

    The town of Harvard was an agrarian village settled 25 miles from Boston in 1658 and incorporated in the early 1700s. Contained within the town were several non-traditional communities. One was a transcendental, utopian group at what is called "Fruitlands". Another was an active Shaker settlement. And a third is the St. Benedict Abbey. The Abbey is still an active monastery at this time and there is a nearby convent/nunnery.

    More on these three, less-common communities to follow.
    KMichael, zookster, B10Dave and 5 others like this.
  17. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Not The Best Old Structure But Maybe An Interesting One: Getting a picture of your bike with an old structure can be pretty easy around here. Just park it somewhere near a town common and walk around it, taking a picture every 90 degrees. Chances are there will be an old structure somewhere in the pictures. Such is the nature of this one, shown below.

    [​IMG]

    This particular old structure was built around 1830 as a town hall. Towns and villages built these when the state mandated separation of church and state, which ended the practices of one building serving as both. Stonework is less common, though, and suggests there was a benefactor at work. More often, such people funded libraries and schools but sometimes a town hall or two. This one is located at coordinates 42.353752, -71.733823.
    KMichael, zookster, bluestar and 2 others like this.
  18. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Going To Harvard For Shakers, Monks and A Bit Of Little Women: As previously noted. Harvard town, not the University, was an agrarian village settled in the mid 1600s. Within the town can be found evidence of three less-traditional communities - Benedictine Monks, Shakers and traces of a dysfunctional, utopian, transcendental commune. Of these, the Benedictine Monks currently occupy a good bit of the village of Still River within the town of Harvard. The abbey is shown below.

    [​IMG]

    The Shaker community in Harvard was established by church dissenters in the mid 1700s. Membership diminished over time and the Shakers dissolved in the early 1900s. Today, a good number of shaker buildings are still standing as private residences . Below is a picture of one such structure, with remnants of the old shaker stone barn.

    [​IMG]

    Remnants of the third less-common community in Harvard can be found at the Fruitlands, which was a transcendental commune founded by Louisa May Allcott's unstable father Amos and an English vegan named Charles Lane. In 1843, a penniless Alcott moved his family to a that utopian agrarian commune. Louisa May, author of Little Women, was seemingly influenced by her short stay there.. As all utopian pipe-dreams, Fruitlands quickly failed.

    Back in April 2014, R2 and I stopped by the place and got a picture of the commune center, which is still standing. The place is currently a (closed) museum of transcendental, shaker and native life in the area.

    [​IMG]

    Today, Harvard is an affluent town with a population somewhere between 6K and 10K. Upscale folks seem to like having the name "Harvard" in their address, especially doctors and lawyers. Back when I was gainfully employed, we looked at real estate there but decided it was a little too "uppity" for once-poor, farm country folk. Who wants to waste money on high property and vehicle excise taxes just to have a fancy address?
    KMichael, zookster, emptyHead and 2 others like this.
  19. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    21,204
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta
    I sure miss the architecture and lazy byways of New England. Great stuff as always.
    popscycle likes this.
  20. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    8,552
    Location:
    Central MA
    Not Your Usual Show Your Bike At The Bridge Picture: I took and posted a number of pictures of this bridge about this time of year some years ago. I found another, previously-unposted image yesterday while looking through April RAW picture files. I thought the picture was worthy of a post since (1) it was an April photo, (2) there aren't many "pumpkin seed" bridges left that you can ride across and (3) the bridge, and its surroundings, rather than the bike, is the star in the pic.

    [​IMG]
    KMichael, zookster, bluestar and 4 others like this.