Goodbye Cruiserface, Hello Happyface: The (old) Long and (new) Short Of It All

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by popscycle, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Anderson's Carriage House Revisited 3 - Charron, Giradot et Voight: For those who've never seen one of these, the Anderson's most grand and expensive car was this 1906 CGV. It cost them $23,000 to build, which would be in the neighborhood of $700,000 today.

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    It was made for long distance travel, which was far more adventurous back then. The car could supposedly do 80 miles per hour with a massive 75 hp, 4 cylinder motor. Road quality, however, would have made such speeds a problem.

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    A seat could be made into a bed and the rear compartment had a pseudo drawing room for Mrs. Anderson. The CGV's most notable amenity might have been its toilet, the plumbing for which is something we wonder about. Was it a straight shot down onto the road like the commodes on trains? I keep forgetting to ask.

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    In any event, it looks to be a proper period pissoir. More to follow.
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  2. drklynoon

    drklynoon Adventurer

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    Pop, That car is amazing. I can't imagine any US roads capable of the speeds of this car. I love the fold out bed option.
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  3. chethro

    chethro Long timer

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    My guess would be no holding tank....:D Pity the turn of the century cyclist following behind. Bombs away!
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  4. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Seen When Out Riding - The Frankenstein Panel: Technically this is a "mercury arc valve rectifier" but it looks like the kind of thing you saw in Frankenstein movies where the mad doctors would flip switches and turn knobs to send electricity into the monster. In reality, this device converted AC to DC and put an electrical charge to battery terminals in the early 1900s.

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    The particular apparatus was made by GE and used to charge the batteries of a 1908 Bailey Electric automobile.
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  5. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    I suspect you're right. After all, in those years, horses were still the primary means of conveyance and people were acclimated to, if not enjoying, excrement in the street. I cannot imagine what it would be like riding your bike through such stuff. Also, I remember taking a train in the mid 20th century where you could look in the WC toilet bowl and see the tracks below.
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  6. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    If you like the fold out bed option, you might have loved the "bathtub" Nash of the late 40s and early 50s. It had a bed option and could be bought used for next to nothing in the late 50s. It should be noted that back then a girl's parents were not happy if you showed up at her house on a motorcycle; however, if you showed up in a Nash, they would make sure she didn't go out with you - ever! :D

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  7. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    A Railroad Favorite: In need of a train fix this afternoon, I dug up this old favorite where two PAS' NS units wait on a MBTA commuter train. I post this in case there's anyone else who'd enjoy a train pic today.

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  8. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Anderson's Carriage House Revisited 4 - A Cord: Below is a nicely restored 1930 Cord L-29. The L-29 was the first American production automobile with front wheel drive.

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    From a design standpoint, the Cord's front wheel drive assembly meant the body could be lower on the frame due to the absence of a rear drive train. This gave the cord a lower, more sleek look than other automobiles of the era. That look persists to this day in the form of a low rider.

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    The L-29 is powered by a 125 hp, straight-8, Lycoming engine. It cost a little over $3,000 when new, which would be a little over $50,000 now. As best I can tell, the value of these models today ranges from over $150,000 to just north of a quarter mil, depending on condition. Unfortunately, the L-29 did not survive the great depression.

    Edit Note: Erett Loban "E.L." Cord, who founded the company, also controlled Lycoming Engines, Duesenberg Inc., New York Shipbuilding, Checker Cab, Stinson Aircraft Company, American Airways (later American Airlines) and other holdings (over 150 in total). He was a very interesting person, who became an influential politician later in life.
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  9. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Scene While Riding: Pic of a park in Brookline, MA, that was taken from the road last week.

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    Looks like they had a small grass fire. Lightning strike on the tree perhaps?
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  10. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Anderson's Carriage House Revisited 5 - Most Rare: Below is a very rare 1925 Luxor Taxi. Squeezed in between a car and a wall/post, getting a good picture was difficult.

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    The Luxor was made between 1924 and 1927 in Framingham, MA in the Bay State Auto Plant, and in Hagerstown, MD, by the M.P. Moller company. Moller was an affiliated company that also made the Crawford Dagmar automobile and other things. It is hard to find any information on the Luxor other than the Andersons bought the taxi as a utilitarian vehicle - perhaps the only known private individuals to purchase one.

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    I was led to believe this was the only Luxor in existence; however, there's reason to suspect a Moller/Hagerstown-made Luxor may be in the Washington County Rural Heritage Transportation Museum south of Hagerstown. I came across this picture whose background matches pictures that of other cars in that museum. Perhaps the Anderson Luxor is the only remaining MA-manufactured taxi.

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    I think we'll put this museum on the dance card for the next time we head south. I have this itch to see and photograph a Dagmar automobile. Who names their car a Dagmar? Aside from being the name of a queen, Dagmar was the also the name of a well-endowed female of the 1950s.
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  11. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    The Continuing Saga Of An Expensive POS:

    In our last episode, I had been persuaded to try to get the unit fixed and driven it several towns over to a service center. This morning around 8:43 AM, EST, I receive an email that read -

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    We've fixed your
    machine


    We have completed the work on your PURE HUMIDIFY + COOL,
    and it is now ready for pick up.
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    So, around 10 AM, I once again drove to the service center to pick up the machine only to learn it had not been fixed. The person in the shop came out (COVID operating rules) and told me they were going to send me a new one. Upon asking why they sent me a letter saying to pick it up here, the resident wizard said, "Their systems are messed up." Understatement noted, I wondered why he said "their systems" and not "our systems". So, I guess we'll wait to see if one shows up here and if it runs for more than 24 or 48 hours without wanting a cleaning cycle or shitting the bed. Since I didn't pay for this thing, I guess it's a bit of an adventure, provided I don't stupidly waste more time on it. The affair is certainly a learning experience, not the least of which is don't be so fast to throw the box away

    Edit Note: More hilarity. After posting the above, I received yet another email (i.e., about the 5th or 6th) about a minute or two ago at 12:04 EST saying they could help me diagnose the problem if I called. Noting that I had explained the problem a number of times in writing and in person, the word FUBAR comes to mind.
  12. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Palmer Diamond Train Fix Link: With thanks to and appreciation for @jeickerman, we have a link to a new webcam at the Palmer, MA, diamond HERE. Back when trains were more frequent, the Palmer diamond was a good riding destination where you could hang out, talk to other rail fans and eat your lunch.

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  13. KMichael

    KMichael Go Explore

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    Love this pic. Amazing.
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  14. drklynoon

    drklynoon Adventurer

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    Pop The Nash is always such an odd one to run across. My mom had a Metropolitan before she even had a license. I love the looks of this one though and the bed option is genius and should be a thing available for new cars.
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  15. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    I am guessing one could pick up a 1950s era, bathtub Nash with bed for somewhere in the neighborhood of $25K. Imagine how cool it would look cruising in one of those these days.

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    One must remember, though, that it is mobile boudoir. :D
  16. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Anderson's Carriage House Revisited 6 - Oh MG: Amidst the high-brow cars on display, there was this nice MG. Being not well versed in MG models, I am guessing this is a T-type MG.. They were made in 1940 and then from 1945 to 1955. If true, the MG is a bit out of place with the other cars on display. If it is an earlier model, I'd like to know. There was no placard.

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    Due to that characteristic failing of wanting to move on, I failed to take more than several pictures and the other one was poorly framed.
  17. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Portrait Of A Motor: Some phtogs take pictures of people, do a whole bunch of post processing and turn the picture into a portrait. Personally, I like portraits of motors and here's one I did today. The pictures was taken on a ride down to CT to the New England Air Museum back before COVID. The subject below is a Packard 3A-2500, V-12 aircraft engine. These found their way into aircraft starting around 1929 and were the most powerful of its time. This engine is only one of two or three known to exist today.

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    It can be a challenge getting motors to pose for you. :D
  18. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Anderson's Carriage House Revisited 7 - Delahaye: Below is a 1948 Delahaye 135M, arguably one of the most celebrated of Delahaye's models.

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    The famous teardrop coachwork was the work and signature style of coachbuilder Giuseppe Figoni. Delehaye had no coachbuilding facilities of its own. The 135M was one of the company's most popular models and sold up until 1954.

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    The company, "Societe Des Automobiles Delahaye", existed from 1894 to 1954. The firm was killed off by punitive taxation by the French government.
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  19. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Larz Anderson Revisited 8 - Fiat: Below is the most powerful car of its time, a 65 hp, 1907 Fiat Tipo 50/60. Manufactured by Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino (i.e., F.I.A.T.), a company founded in 1899 that persists to this day, this auto was the super car of its day.

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    This particular auto was the company's first 6 cylinder unit made in a production run of 116. It was a very expensive car back then. Priced at around $12,000 in 1907, its price would equate to the rarefied air of million dollar cars today. Below is info on the car that I found from Hemmings.

    Old-car people often think about the thousands of makes that have come and gone over the years. More than 2,000 names no longer appear on new cars, and while that large number looms in our minds, maybe we should instead celebrate the handful that have celebrated a centenary--Rolls-Royce, Mercedes-Benz, Peugeot, Renault, Alfa Romeo, Fiat, Skoda, Morgan, Vauxhall, Ford, Aston Martin and a few others. Of all the European makes, none was more visible in America than Fiat in the early days.. Despite selling a generally, and sometimes startlingly, high-end lineup of cars, by 1907 Fiat was the top imported make in America.

    Specifications Engine: 11,038cc T-head straight-six, cast in pairs, dual camshafts Horsepower: 58 A.L.A.M. @ 1,200 RPM Torque: N/A Fuel system: Single Rayfield/Findeisen & Kropf updraft carburetor Transmission: Four-speed selective sliding gear rear transmission/differential, double chain drive 0-60 MPH: Interminable Top speed: 80 MPH (est) Length: 180 inches Width: 69 inches Height: 59 inches Wheelbase: 139 inches Curb weight: 3,000 pounds (est.)

    Lovingly unrestored, this is the only one known to have survived.

    Edit Note 1: I made one alteration to the photo by editing out a barrier rope surrounding the car.

    Edit Note 2: in searching around this morning to learn what other (than the cars and the auto museum) contribution Larz Anderson may have made, we learn he was a born-into-wealth bon vivant with connections who married into more wealth (i.e., the Boston Weld family) and lived the life of the idle rich.
  20. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Making A Move On Spring: The redhead was picked up today and is off to Max for fresh fluids and new shoes.

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    I probably had another thousand or two in the rear but decided to get it done how. The dealer was having a winter free delivery and pickup special for service business so it seemed like a good idea to do scheduled service and tires, making the move to 80-20 Anakee Adventure tires after seven good years with Anakee 3. I see more gravel in my future. More specifically, I see roads like this.

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