Goodbye Cruiserface, Hello Happyface: The (old) Long and (new) Short Of It All

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by popscycle, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. zookster

    zookster Chupacabra

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    The "Hat in the Ring" Squadron! I read Rickebanker's autobiography many years ago. Great read.
    KMichael and popscycle like this.
  2. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    After you read up on the life of Eddie Rickenbacker, you almost have to ask, "Is there anything he didn't do?" I only recently learned the WWI ace (26 kills) was in a B17 in WWII that went down in the Pacific Ocean. He survived to go on and do other stuff. The man was a hero to my father's generation.
    KMichael, klaviator, black 8 and 2 others like this.
  3. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    More Fiat Pics: I converted several more pictures of that 1907 Fiat super car, the first of which is a BxW of the one above.

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    Below is a front-end view of the car. In 1907, this was the look of prestige and power.

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    And lastly, a close-up look at the 11 liter, 65 HP, 6-cylinder engine. It had dual camshafts, single updraft carb, top speed of 80 mph and gave the car a total weight of around 3,000 lbs. Cylinder heads were cast in pairs and joined, which caused torsional vibration in the crankshaft at higher speeds. At slower speeds, however, the 6 was smoother than the 4-cylinder and lower cars.

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    The only alteration to these pictures was editing out the barrier rope around the car, the shadow of which can still be seen in the bottom right corner of the middle pic. I forgot to take that out and am too lazy to do it now.
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  4. chethro

    chethro Long timer

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    :hmmmmmYou may see more :muutt Remember pics if she is asleep! :D

    On a serious note, do you carry a Garmin Inreach, Spot or PLB with you? I use a Garmin Inreach and like the size and the cheapest plans works for how I use the device. In my area, cell service disappears as you leave towns or the interstate.
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  5. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    The Quintessential Horseless Carriage: Back in the very early 1900s, the first cars were really horse carriages with a motor and steering gear added. Such is the case with this 1908 Bailey electric.

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    This car was advertised for ladies as a vehicle that was easy to steer and drive. Being easier to start than a "break your arm" gas engine crank, it was a natural for dainty damsels. You can't see it but there is a footman's seat at the rear of this car. Affluent ladies of the day often had an accompanying footman to carry and load all the stuff she brought or bought. Below is a period ad and illustration of the Bailey factory.

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    With Edison, rather than Exide, batteries, the advertised range was 100 miles at a cost of 1 cent per mile. It weighed around 2,000 lbs. and could make close to 20 mph. The battery charging station, previously shown, was a mercury arc vapor valve (i.e., AC to DC rectifier) affair shown again below.

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  6. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    I don't carry such a device but probably should. Greatly appreciate the thought and will definitely look into it. Think spring!
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  7. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Auto Errata Seen: Interesting radiator cap on a 1927 Lincoln limousine.

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    The radiator cap figure looks suspiciously like the greyhound bus emblem, making me think it did not come as standard equipment.

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  8. ShOqUePoT

    ShOqUePoT GS Pot

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    That was indeed the Lincoln mascot from 1925 through the '30's.
    Edit:
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  9. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Blast From A Winter Past - Milling Around In Brewster: Below are several additional images of the Stony Brook gristmill in Brewster, MA.

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    The mill is located at coordinates 41.744810, -70.112615 in Brewster. The mill is the last remaining structure in what used to be a 19th century industrial village. You can still buy ground corn meal when the mill is open.

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    This is truly one of the most photogenic sites on the cape.

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    Also of interest is the annual herring and alewife run up Stony Brook. Across the road from the mill are foot paths along the brook where you can watch the fish spawning run.

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    The sign says, "do not play with, pickup or touch the herring."
  10. chethro

    chethro Long timer

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    I worked on electrical equipment like this at US Steel in Pittsburg PA. Two of the areas I worked were 1939 vintage. Very Frankenstin'ish controls. It was amazing what was done with resistors, relays, capacitors and contactors. Everything was in the open and accessible. We don't need no stinkin cabinets!
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  11. ShOqUePoT

    ShOqUePoT GS Pot

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    No safety considerations back then. 10 years ago I bought a 1923 washing machine, got it running, and sold it to a museum. Here it is off the museum website:
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    Open motor, over water, no on/off switch (you plugged it in and it ran) and a mechanical reduction in speed allowing for enough torque to rip a housewives' hand off. The other thing that made me laugh was the oil fill caps on top of the two "feet". You filled them to keep the joints and slip mechanism of the feet lubed. Where would the excess oil wind up? In the clothes you were washing of course.
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  12. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    As a youngster, I always thought it would be cool to work in a place full of meters, knife switches, relays, etc.; with the holy grail being an ENIAC-like machine. One part of my bedroom looked like a not-all-that-bright, mad scientist lab complete with jacobs ladder, tesla coil, oscilloscopes and other electronic paraphernalia. The closest I got to the ENIAC dream was working nights in a big room full of big boxes full of vacuum tubes they called computers. I put myself thru college working 2nd and 3rd shifts running those things. By then, all the big meters, switches and relays were gone. Once, someone even took a picture of my endeavors.

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    Note the big "pizza oven" hoods over the computer components (e.g., IBM 650). The concentration of vacuum tubes generated a lot of heat.
  13. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Congratulations on what looks to be a great restoration job on a very interesting piece of washing equipment. As an aside, we used to get and use old Maytag gas washing machine motors for various forms of propulsion.
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  14. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    The Saga Continues - Useful Appliance or Expensive POS? The company kept its word as we came home to find this on the porch. One the chance that someone here has or knows someone who has a need or desire for exceptional air quality, we will continue to report on this thing.

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    More to follow, including whether or not the thing keeps working longer than 24 hours.
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  15. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Larz Anderson Revisited 10 - LaSalle, The Lesser Caddy: General Motors success from the 1920s to 1940 was due, in no small part, to its market segmentation and building cars to meet specific price ranges. Noting Packard making inroads into Cadillac's market share, CEO Alfred Sloan noticed a price gap between its Buick and Cadillac autos. Thus, the LaSalle was developed to fill that gap. It was designed by a newbie named Harley Earl who would later go on to head up GM design , produce classic designs like the 1957 Chevy and 1958 Cadillac as well as father the Corvette. The first LaSalle model came out in 1927. The car below is the 1931 345A series coup.

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    The LaSalle shared the same mechanicals with the Cadillac and was built to the same standards. It gained a solid foothold in the GM price range lineup (i.e., Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oakland, Oldsmobile, Viking, Marquette, Buick, LaSalle and Cadillac) and had a full range of body styles (e.g., coupe, phaeton, roadster, etc.).

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    The year 1940 saw the last LaSalle model and the brand was retired. It should be noted that since 1933, LaSalle consistently outsold Cadillacs but by 1935 the Packard One outsold LaSalles by some 70+% up until 1940. It was then decided to fold the LaSalle into the more prestigious Cadillac marquee and drop the LaSalle moniker. Since that time, GM has shed most of its models and greatly consolidated platforms and mechanicals as its market share was gobbled up by other companies. GM today is just a hollow shell of its former self with just about everybody eating its lunch.
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  16. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Tuesday Train Fix: With the redhead in for new fluids and shoes, I was forced to do my train chasing in the toasty warm confines of the Miata this morning. I managed to catch a few, beginning with NECR backing out of the yard.

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    3850 was backing out so that two other units could switch to another track.

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    It sat by the station for a while, waiting for other yard action to get done.

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    More to follow as I get pics converted from RAW.
    KMichael, klaviator, chethro and 4 others like this.
  17. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    The Saga Continues Part 2 - Useful Appliance or Expensive POS? One the chance that someone here has or knows someone who has a need or desire for exceptional air quality, we will continue to report on this air purifier and humidifier. Now having the replacement in hand for the first unit, which didn't last much past 24 hours, we unpacked what look looked like a new unit.

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    All the parts were in the box - the basic unit, two air filters, power cord and remote control. I set it on the counter for assembly.

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    Assembly consists of pulling off the tape, taking off the filter covers and inserting the front/rear air filters.

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    The final step was to pull out the water container, fill and reinsert. The water reservoir has a collapsible handle and rollers.

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    Rollers made it easy to push the reservoir into place. I placed the unit on the floor, plugged it in and turned it on. Thus far it has run continuously for over 24 hours with no problems and is collecting and reporting air data on the iPhone. Air volume, circulation, filtration and humidification is good thus far.

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    Note: The graph shows how I was playing with the settings to test them.
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  18. jeickerman

    jeickerman Full of it.

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    Too damn fancy. :)

    John
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  19. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Not to mention too damn expensive and possibly troublesome (as the first unit was). As I stated, I wouldn't have bought it but will give it a go since it was a gift and since knowledge about the unit may be of some benefit to others. As an immediate observation, for not having any external fan blades, this things moves a good bit of air relatively quietly and quite safely.
    KMichael, klaviator, JRowland and 2 others like this.
  20. popscycle

    popscycle Fahren Away Super Supporter

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    Train Fix Pics: More pictures from yesterday's excursion to the Palmer diamond.

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    NECR was moving freight from its line onto CSX. To do that, it has to cross CSX, going on far enough so it can shove the cars on down the CSX siding.

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