Got a Garden?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by RustyStuff, May 31, 2015.

  1. RockyRaccoon

    RockyRaccoon Found:Gideon's Bible

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    We're in the midst of a drought, so we planted just five tomato plants this year, which we water with what's left when we empty the horse trough to put in fresh water.

    We planted:
    Sungold
    Early Girl
    Purple Cherokee
    Black Krim
    Paul Robeson

    So far the plants are looking good and there are a few green tomatoes on several of the them.
    #21
  2. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Anyone tried "Back To Eden" style wood chip mulching?
    #22
  3. RustyStuff

    RustyStuff Long timer Supporter

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    I did some reading about it. No personal experience but It sounds like it would work fine.


    Built a Compost tumbler on Sunday-

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    Built another planting bed last night. Same as the last big one at 4x8. Not sure what I'm going to plant in it.

    Everything it going nuts, we have had 5 days now over 100* Planted some Okra and some cabbages, more carrots. Almost all of my last plantings have taken off. Fun to watch the corn grow, it seems to double in size every day.

    Ibbob, I really like the greenhouse. Mine is going to be pretty similar. I'm thinking I'll try and build some of the base out of cinder blocks and concrete on top of the concrete stringers that are in the ground. The old house site on the other side of the yard has Water and Power with a good southern exposure. I'm thinking something like 12 or 16x8x8 may be a good size.
    #23
  4. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    #24
  5. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light Super Supporter

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    Nice!

    I found on my composters access from the end was a bit difficult, the side openers seem to work better for me.

    Get ready to turbo charge your garden, the compost works amazing!

    Bacteria ROCKS!
    #25
  6. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Do those rotating composters work well enough to produce enough compost?
    I fill my first 8cu yd bin a few times, the level dropping between each fill. Once sunk back to 1/2 depth I then turn it over in to next bin to aerate it. Once that has shrunk to half again it goes into the final maturing stage. Then used.

    The early peas have just started cropping really well. The pea maincrop Alderman is podding up and should be plastered is a fortnight. Have another maincrop variety Hurst Green Shaft in seed trays ready sprouted and busting to get in the ground.
    All of our peas are hertitage varieties and produce crops over quite a long period. The F1 types are often intended to all be ready at the same time, which is good for farmers who want to harvest once, but I want to just go pick enough for this meal.
    We tried some F1 chantenay carrots, yup all ready together. Ok if you are storing for winter in a clamp, but these are supposed to be small snacking carrots.


    Got a load of wood chips and lay them around. If nothing else, they make good cheap paths.
    The soil round the plants is cooler and moister, which I presume is a "GOOD THING"?
    Weeding is a lot easier. Normally, a rain shower will see any soil greening over - thistles, nettles, sticky willy and docks first then loads of other crap I don't know the names of. None of that now, just occasionally something pokes its head above the parapet, but is so easy to pull.
    So far the only thing not detered is bindweed, of which we have a lot. There are miles of dykes around here to drain the fens (we are below sea level), and the Middle Level Commissioners only get to clean and dredge each one every few years. Otherwise they are breeding grounds for the sodding convolvulus - and its not called mile-a-minute for nothing.

    Beechgrove Gardens is a lovely Scottish bbc TV gardening programme, been on air for 30+ years. The actual gardens are up in Aberdeen, which is pretty far north, 57.15N. They still do quite a bit of veg stuff. Back issues on utube.
    I much prefer it to the English bbc Gardeners World - pretentious twaddle usually.
    #26
  7. gastone

    gastone R.I.P. my little girl Izzy

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    I've got a small city lot (1/8 acre). Not much room to garden here. I put in 4- 4x8x1 raised beds three seasons ago. One is dedicated to strawberries (about 80 plants +/-) these days. One other has a tomato, a squash, and some garlic. The last has onions, greens, and a melon. Stuff to get my wife and I by day-to-day. We also do pumpkins that I just plant in with the landscaping.

    However, my mother has a two acre lot about 15 minutes away. That's where I try to do most of my gardening for canning. She loves the idea of gardening, but not the reality. The last few years the garden has gone to shit as she refuses to weed it, and I have a hell of a time getting her to even water it. So this year I decided to build 9 raised beds, which should help limit the amount of weeding (for a season or two anyway). I also put in an irrigation system for 6 of the beds (I'll work out the kinks this year on the irrigation and then put it in all the beds next year). We also plan on expanding the garden next year, which means I'll be building more raised beds this fall. I'm about 80% done with setup. Still some more mulching to be done and there's always more cleanup, but things are starting to produce and do well.

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    And my daughter last fall with a couple of 'punkins' that we grew here in the city.

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    #27
    Hannda likes this.
  8. Murf2

    Murf2 Long timer

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    Hey Les, How wide is that fabric you have down? It looks wider them what I can find but it may be the photo. Where do you buy it? Your plants look great!

    Murf
    #28
  9. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light Super Supporter

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    Output depends on the materials and temp. I run a couple but have considered a bulk setup as well. This time of year I get compost every 3 weeks as it is hotter than.....

    50/50 brown to green with a bit of horse crap to freshen:wink:
    #29
  10. vintagemxr

    vintagemxr old fahrt, nobody special

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    I planted a few ornamental things in the yard for the first time this year. They all died except the cactus. On the other hand my two corgis are happy and healthy. Corgis rock. GSDs are a very close second.
    #30
  11. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    This time of year we have so much stuff, grass clippings, veg by product - stems and leaves and such, I think I'd need several just to keep up.
    The three piles I have take about a day per fortnight. Well after I've finished I'm too fucked to do anything else. Conservative estimate is about three tons across the three bins.
    Most time is spent on the first wetting everything down, which of course makes it heavy to shovel.

    Had to cut the haulme off the potatoes because of blight. It was the red Duke of York, a heirloom variety with little resistance. The spuds should be ok - hoping! The next variety, Anya, is a modern type and was left untouched. Same with the Nicola.
    Just hauled in the Red Baron onions and called it best with the strawberries - any that come now will be for the birds. Went nextdoor to pinch a few of the neighbours and they had been taken by the bunnies, we know it was them because their cats had trapped them under the fleece.
    Peas are doing well this year, unlike the beans which are yield light and very late. The corn, looks healthy but stunted.

    If this humid weather continues we will get concerned about the tomatoes. SHE planted far too many and some of the poorest beans went to make space.
    54 or 57 - too many to shake a stick at.

    Now we have started harvesting and seeing bare earth again, we have started arguing what we are going to plant/sow next. First topic is the brassicas for winter/spring. Yes, the nights will be drawing in again in a couple of days. Soon be xmas.

    Have fun with your hands in the dirt.
    #31
  12. Les Peterson

    Les Peterson Been here awhile

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    My neighbor works for a asphalt company and that is some left over 12'6" wide stuff they use under the pavement for weed control. That stuff works great for the melon patch.
    #32
  13. Murf2

    Murf2 Long timer

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    That would be perfect for my needs. At least, I will now know were to look. Thanks a bunch!

    Murf
    #33
  14. RustyStuff

    RustyStuff Long timer Supporter

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    Update. Everything is growing fast with the sustained temp's over 90, 115 predicted this weekend. Going to have to water multiple time's I believe.



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    #34
  15. DMZ

    DMZ Castor Bean Addict

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    My bean patch is looking good. Couple more weeks:

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    The tomatoes are just putting on small fruits:

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    #35
  16. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    I’m pulling up the last of my radishes this weekend ( Great crop this year) any sugestions on what to plant in their place? (5 rows 5 feet long.) or should i wait a month or two and plant radishes again?
    Southern New England
    #36
  17. Nico

    Nico Save the @Pork Butt

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    If you have a couple months to wait, plant lettuce in the space. You'll harvest and then be ready for more radishes.
    #37
  18. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Agree with Nico above.

    We have quite a few different varieties of salad leaves.

    We get packets of mixed leaves, different leaf colour and shape to give interest to the salad bowl. You can cut and come again. Sow a few at a time, every week or so to get leaves for as long as you want. You can sow into small containers once you need the ground.
    Radicchio is a bit slow but will work for ages. Another you can just harvest what you need.
    Reine de Glace has worked really well for us this year, not bolting despite it being reasonably hot.
    Escarole is a slightly bitter endive type salad. Another you can cut and come again. Gives that variation on the plate. Can be long lasting like the radicchio. Best to put a plate or tile over the centre once growing to blanch it.

    A couple of months should grow you some beetroot. We have had great success with Pablo, an F1. Pulled as baby beet, they only need a short cooking time. We normally go with heritage ones but these have been great in front of peas, beans and tomatoes in the hot border, by the south facing fence.
    #38
  19. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    Lettuce and Beets it is.. Thank you Nicco and Nick Guzzi. G.
    #39
  20. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Ok - get to it!

    An alternative is to shove some green manure in. Depends what your land may lack, nitrogen or humus or whatever, but likely there is a plant that can go some way to help.
    Some green manure seeds can be a bit thuggish, so do check out their habits.

    My BiL's allotment in Frankfurt is on a geological sandune. A bucket of water disappears straight in. He plants mustard seed as soon as a crop comes out - even if it's just for a couple of weeks.
    My garden here in Fenland is pretty rich so I plant phacilia, more for the bees than anything.
    #40