Got a Garden?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by RustyStuff, May 31, 2015.

  1. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    Everything from seed.. Radishes were yummy(Blank corner where the skinny sunflowers are)
  2. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    They really are! Sometimes we take our breakfast tea out into the garden and feast on the radish as we pull them.
    We do wipe off most of the dirt. It is organic and homemade.
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  3. mike

    mike Long timer

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  4. Trust

    Trust but verify

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    We did self-watering pots from 5 gallon buckets. Really helped us deal with fluctuations in water from the skies. If you are going to be in rentals for a while, you may want too try one next year (or this year for a fall crop.
    You can empty them each year and being them in for the winter, or even extend your season with a garage/out-building/other overnight shelter once temperatures drop by just sheltering overnight. We've done peppers (hot/poblano/green/tomatillo/etc), tomatoes, herbs, cucumbers, zucchini and more in ours. It limits you to one plant per pot at first, but it seems you don't mind that limitation to get started...

    This was our 5 gallon bucket variety, and they seem to work well overall. Those two fig trees got planted in the ground tonight ... Notice the super long roots toward the bottom left of the image - those were all in the bottom bucket which just holds water. Happy plants.
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  5. chippertheripper

    chippertheripper motorcycle junkie Supporter

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    Not bad for a downtown neighborhood garden.
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    L to r: strawberries by themselves, broccoli, cukes and ‘maters in the middle, and carrots, cantaloupe and watermelon on the right.
    Each box was made from 2/12 rough cut and has 3ea sunflowers along the very back.
    We have beautiful loamy dirt here, which was provided from excavating for the slab I poured for my new shed; we just moved here last December.
    New shed was built for a shiny new 790advr, and because I lost a garage in the move.
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  6. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Here we are advised to constrict the root run of fig trees, presumably our shorter growing season and cooler, wetter climate stops things happening on larger plant.
    In southern France and Italy, they literally grow like weeds out of cracks in rocks or on cliff sides.

    Many years ago I bought a fig for a friend who had a large south facing wall on the back of his house.t It has gone potty, really vigourous and produced far more fruit than he can ever think of uses for.
    He lives in London, and they have a micro climate several degrees warmer than most of the country.
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  7. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    It is. And its even bigger now. I need to start cutting it back some.
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  8. miguelitro

    miguelitro I like the ads, in fact, give me more ads.

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    Harvested a tray of worm compost today and started some compost tea as I finally got a bubbler.

    The worm compost is amazing as always and full of worms and worm eggs.

    The compost tea is simply the water from washing out the base of my Can-o-Worms, a few handfuls of worm compost with the worms removed, a couple ounces of molasses, and about a half of a cup of fish emulsion. I plan to use it as foliar spray as well as for watering.
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    My peppers are finally growing as it's finally been hot and sunny after a very cool start of the summer here. Also, finally getting tomatoes, spaghetti squash, etc... IMG_0084.jpg
  9. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Funny old season so far.
    Last Thursday was the hottest ever recorded temperature in the UK. 38.8C, and only a few miles down the road from us.

    Last night and today, lots of rain. Last time it rained, all the nearly ready tomatoes split. But now we have sufficient coming through.
    As usual, the patio peppers are producing pretty well compared to the green house ones. Our aubergines are starting to fruit up, after a couple of weeks with flowers.
    Cucumbers, courgettes and beans, both runner and French bush, are going crazy.

    The main crop strawberries were a wash for everyone in the area, including the commercial ones. Our raspberries are slow too. A brief showing earlier than usual, but now about a month late.

    Our new cover to stop the pigeons and butterflies is working well. All the brassicas for winter are looking great.
    Looking forward to sowing the over winter spinach and carrots.
    Leeks are in. Must remember to get the garlic and shallots earlier this year.
    Garlic this year a disaster, rust destroyed the lot - both varieties.
    The shallots did really well, a fine crop. Drying in the green house, need a bit more trimming.
    Our beetroot started well, but the succession sowing produced very little, and lots of bolting. Same with the spring sown carrots (although we have enough.

    Such is the life of the gardener - keep trying people!
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  10. MNdirt

    MNdirt less than 1% juice

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    Green and yellow wax beans are trickling in. The yellow wax are my favorite of the two because I can let them grow a bit larger and they don't get tough like green beans do. The downside is that they're vulnerable to rust, so I enjoy them while I can.

    The sweet corn began to tassel last week and it's showing promise.

    Carrots aren't looking very good. Soil conditions were very bad for small seeds this spring. Very, very lumpy.

    Potatoes look excellent. Whites took a while to come up, but are coming on strong now. Reds are doing well, too. Both blossomed a few weeks back. I hope to carry a couple hundred pounds down into the basement this fall.

    Buttercup squash appear to be doing well.
  11. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

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    We live in a class A motor coach, based in a park in Oregon's Willamette Valley. In our small space we have:
    12 different types of Tomatoes.
    27 Pepper plants
    2 Tomatillo plants
    2 Cucumber plants (Lemon)
    All in containers.
    We have a 250 gallon patio pond with a UV light and canister filter, and two smaller still water ponds. Once a week I clean the filter media, and then mix the sludge with water in a 5 gallon bucket. I pour that into the plant pots.
    The large pond has two waterlilies in it, the next smallest has Yellow Flag Iris and Lotus, and the smallest has just Lotus.
    I also grow Bonsai trees....
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  12. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    I have many tomatoes on 1 plant. Will too many stunt the size of them ?
    Wondering if I should cut some away.
  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Depends a lot on your local conditions. Are you growing cordons or bush type?

    Here, with our cool dampness, the rule of thumb is to stop the plant after 4 trusses for cordons. Quite how large the trusses will be, is down to the variety of tomato. Snipping out the smallest in each truss will tend to make the rest larger.

    You could try pruning some and leaving others as a trial, or asking around locally. See what works best in your area, with your climate.
    Here tomatoes will continue to grow and produce flowers (if not ripen because of the lack of sunlight) until the cold or disease kills them. So as long as you have warmth and light, any losses due to over exuberant pruning should be replaced.
    I believe that the original tomato was a perennial, but from tropical/sub tropical areas. I have heard of people in Canada growing them commercially until November with only mild heat.

    This year, our Marmande* - a large beefsteak type - are producing like crazy despite the cool/cold/wet/hot/wet, They can normally be quite tardy. Our biggest problem is the onset of blight due to rain washing the spores onto the leaves.

    *just had a our first marmande tomato for lunch. Very ripe, very juicy with excellent flavour. Went well with fresh homemade bread and French brie.
  14. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    Its a Mortgage Lifter
    Thats one plant
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  15. TNWillie

    TNWillie Been here awhile

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    That last picture reminds me of an idea I'd like some feedback to, if possible. Does anyone have any experience with dwarf fruit trees? I ask because I'm giving serious thought to ripping up the Nandina bushes on the south side of my deck and replacing them with a couple of fruit trees. Any responses based upon experience would be much appreciated.
  16. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    In the small gardens over here, fruit trees on dwarfing rootstock are common.
    They need a post support for life. The tree dwarfs because the root ball is tiny and a decent wind will cause root rock.
    A previous owner had planted lots on our plot, she had used only flimsy bamboo canes for support. Some years the trees produced enough fruit we had to prop them up.
    In the end our soil quite quickly eats any of the stakes we can get, and the trees were in the wrong place. Turned out the root ball had not excaped its original container size, and the trees just pulled out easily by hand.
    They do work, they are far more common here than larger trees, but they need fairly close supervision.
    We are thinking of getting some supertiny "step over" apples and pears, about a foot high then cordoned to form a hedge/separation between the productive part and the grass.
    https://www.pomonafruits.co.uk/fruit-nut-trees/stepover-apple-pear-trees
  17. TNWillie

    TNWillie Been here awhile

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    THANKS! I wasn't familiar with Stepovers but will look into them. I hope they're available in the States.
  18. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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  19. Trust

    Trust but verify

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    Has anyone ever bought an Eley hose reel, and if so, have you gotten a discount code you'd be willing to share? :ear
  20. mike

    mike Long timer

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    Habanero. :annie

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