Got a Garden?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by RustyStuff, May 31, 2015.

  1. PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2011
    Oddometer:
    354
    I have forgone the traditional garden and have opted for 5 gallon self watering buckets. Much easer almost zero weeding and water one a week. Another benefit is supposedly that since you are not watering from the top you are not watering in diseases that can accumulate on top of the soil. Not sure I believe this or not but I can say the plants show no sign of disease and are super healthy.

    Also this year I topped the pepper plants when they were about 6" tall. It was hard to do because you essentially cut off the top 1/2 of the plant and think you going to kill it buts it for the better. Within a week the plant had new growth and were almost as tall as before. The benefit is the plant will get more bushy than tall and produce more fruit. It also is more wind resistant because there is not one main long tall stock but lots of branches off a shorter thicker main stalk.

    The herb garden was my daughter wash tub fairy garden that was repurposed into a herb garden. This is a traditional top water planter setup and it need water ever other day if not every day. Much less efficient than the self water ucket set up.

    G1.jpg G2.jpg G3.jpg G4.jpg
    mike and nickguzzi like this.
  2. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Milwaukie, Oregon. The Great North Wet
    When we moved from the stick house into the 39 foot class A coach we now call home, We gave up this:

    June 21-08 001.jpg
    37'w x 75'L x 4'D. Every rock and plant was placed there by me. I even brought in Tree Frogs which bred to the point that in the spring time, they could be heard half a mile away...
    Now we have everything in containers. Even my pond, which can be taken apart, flat packed and moved.

    Pond Rim.jpg

    And This

    IMG_20190621_161532838.jpg

    And This

    IMG_20181021_124720149[1].jpg

    This past June, I went out and netted out a few dozen tadpoles and resettled them in my current ponds...
    MiniBike and nickguzzi like this.
  3. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Milwaukie, Oregon. The Great North Wet
    This morning I was out watering. Other than the vegetable garden, we have landscaped our space in our base camp much to the delight of the park owners. I put in the fence, added the trellis, amended the soil and scattered wildflower and perennial seeds.
    You can see one of the frogs from that bunch of tadpoles, in the bottom picture.

    Attached Files:

  4. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    11,814
    Location:
    NH
    Suggestions on what I can use to kill the caterpillars that are eating all my kale? Been going through and squishing them, but there's a lot of plants, and I know I've missed a bunch.
  5. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,121
    Location:
    below the sea
    Prevention is really the best way, I make a tent of 1/2" stiffish mesh, works a treat and not mega expensive. Picking off caterpillars and smashing the eggs is unpleasant, time consuming and a pain. And yes, you will have missed some. At least they drown quick if you have a bucket with a couple of pint of water in the bottom. I have been told that there are few predators as they are apparently unpleasant to eat - who knew?

    First line is to rub the eggs with a thumb, that way you get a few dozen at a time. Check under every leaf.
    The larger yellow and black crawlers are fairly easy to find, although if not quite caught first time, they drop to the floor and go hide.
    The pale green ones - from the lesser cabbage white - are harder to spot and tend to go down towards the center of the plant. Less of them, but can be more easily missed.

    Some organic gardeners swear by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacillus_thuringiensis. Which is used as a spray. Supposedly a non transferable disease specific the caterpillars.

    Of all my brassicas, I find that the kale is always the last to get chomped. The netting mentioned above, mean I only have the slug damage to worry about.
    Slugs this year took a fancy to the spring cabbage and made a real mess. Most of the rest - Brussels sprouts, kale and purple sprouting broccoli have been mostly spared.
    The other patch, the wind blew the netting off and all the real winter hardy cabbage have been skeletonised. We are hoping they have enough umph in them to recover and grow some new leaves and heart up.
  6. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Milwaukie, Oregon. The Great North Wet
    This time of year, I'm usually in a constant battle against Aphids sucking the life out of my water lilies. Lady Bugs won't go near the floating leaves or buds, but somehow, Ants have managed to set up an Aphid ranch.
    This year I tried something new. I bought a fine mesh net back in June to catch tadpoles. Now, I spray the Aphids off the leaves with a hose end sprayer set on "Shower" then I start scooping the waxy bastards up with the net. I don't get all of them, but I get enough that they don't do much damage.
    You can tell it's made a difference this year in the vigorous growth on the plant, and the number of blooms the corms are sending out.
    So far this year, my Wanvisa lily has recovered from a raccoon attack on the entire pond last fall, and sent up three blooms in the past two weeks, with two more just under the surface.
    It's hard to tell what the bloom will look like with a Wanvisa, They can be from pink to apricot to yellow; and quite often they are half and half...
    Here's a shot of two of the blooms this week, and a shot of one of those now grown into frog tadpoles...

    Attached Files:

  7. Trust

    Trust but verify

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,333
    Location:
    Still in NC
    Okay, that's a pretty freaking cool looking flower.
    Da Bear likes this.
  8. Trust

    Trust but verify

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,333
    Location:
    Still in NC
    For pests, try a dusting of diatomaceous earth, liberally applied, and reapplied after any precipitation. It has worked well for a number of our pest fights, except the squash bugs.
  9. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Milwaukie, Oregon. The Great North Wet
    Yeah. Not in a pond....
  10. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,437
    Location:
    Milwaukie, Oregon. The Great North Wet
    We grow in pots as well. I do have a couple of flower beds for perennial wildflowers and a few annual vines.
    Speaking of vines, does anyone here have any experience growing Apios americana, Indian Ground Nut?
  11. TNWillie

    TNWillie Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Oddometer:
    746
    Location:
    NE TN
    While we're talking gardens, does anyone have experience growing dwarf fruit trees? If so, would you do it again? Also, what is the best time of year to transplant them?
  12. MiniBike

    MiniBike Casual Observer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,885
    Location:
    Cowford
    I can opine re: Citrus in Florida.

    I've got a dwarf Ruby Red grapefruit that I planted about 30 years ago. With only one major pruning during that period (maybe 10 years ago) it's about 10' tall with an 8' spread and still produces more fruit than we (and the neighbors) can eat in a season. As soon as I find a dwarf variety, I'll be ripping out a much younger Meyer Lemon that is over 25' x '15 and needs annual trimming. I manage to keep the 2 standard Oranges (Navel & Blood) in check, but dwarf varieties of these would make life easier. Less maintenance, less fertilizer and much easier picking. I would imagine any fruit common to your area would be similar. Unless you're planting an heirloom, the varieties available today produce so well that unless you're a commercial grower, really want to produce massive amounts of fruit for yourself or your local food bank has an active group of gleaners for the end of season bounty - you're in for a lot of work.

    Go with Dwarf varieties! Just my .02.

    I'd suggest checking with your county Extension Agent for planting specifics.
    TNWillie and Da Bear like this.
  13. miguelitro

    miguelitro I like the ads, in fact, give me more ads.

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,275
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
  14. jb882

    jb882 13HP of fury.

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Oddometer:
    955
    Location:
    Peoples republic of Taxachusetts
    I use neem oil in mine, I get a lot less damage that way from insects and caterpillars.

    On thing I should mention, buy it in concentrate and mix it yourself in a garden sprayer. The spray bottles in the store are stupid expensive for how much you her vs mixing it yourself.
    Da Bear likes this.
  15. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,121
    Location:
    below the sea
    Just been talking to a professional grower here. He uses the Bascilus Thurengenis. He swears by it and his market garden is a testament to its effectiveness. No holes at all on any of his brassicas, all uncovered and lots of both types of cabbage white butterfly about.
    He is totally bio/eco/permaculture and organic - no residues, nothing to wash off.
    I think spray application every two weeks during butterfly time.

    This is something will try next year. Fortunately the netting we set up has also provided a successful barrier, but is a bit of a faff when you when you are staking, removing the finished leaves, and weeding - not that there is too much of that as we are no dig.
  16. miguelitro

    miguelitro I like the ads, in fact, give me more ads.

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,275
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    ^Yes, BT is the answer to caterpillars. Neem oil is kinda worthless in my opinion as it gets rid of beneficial insects as well.

    Mike
    nickguzzi likes this.
  17. UngaWunga

    UngaWunga Mosquito bait

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    11,814
    Location:
    NH
    What do y'all suggest for aphids?
  18. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,121
    Location:
    below the sea
    Ladybirds/bugs. We can buy them online and have some shipped.
    A water jet and just wash them off.
    A spray with soapy water. Here we can get horticultural soap - a thick dilutable paste - which contains the right fatty acids to do most damage to the bugs breathing system. Supposedly no residues, people also use dish soap.
    Some crops you can pinch out the succulent growing tips, which is what they prefer. Works well with broad beans for example . Or just squish them with a finger.
    Ants are often involved in transporting the aphyids, so they can milk them for the honeydew. Do them in to stop aphid exploitation!

    This last year has been pretty mild for any sort of aphid here.
  19. MiniBike

    MiniBike Casual Observer

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,885
    Location:
    Cowford
    I plant two bell pepper plants every year, but this has been a banner year. Raccoons notwithstanding. :baldy I've been alternately harvesting from one plant to the other every 10 days or so. This was from today’s (one plant). There are still 5-7 smaller peppers remaining on the same plant these came from. I’ve already got 3 quart size freezer bags of diced and frozen peppers. I’m running out of recipes.

    They may look small, but that's an 8L Tupperware bowl.

    Attached Files:

    jb882, nickguzzi and Da Bear like this.
  20. jb882

    jb882 13HP of fury.

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Oddometer:
    955
    Location:
    Peoples republic of Taxachusetts
    Those look great. I have had a great year with peppers too. Lots of jalapeño’s and I did really well with poblanos, I have one poblano plant that is taller than my wife who is 5’4” or so. The thing is huge. Did well on bells too, I did red and yellow and they are just starting to change color now.

    Other than tomatoes and peppers my garden was a huge bust this year. We had a lot or rain in June here that killed all my squash plants, kale, peas, beans and cukes. My garden was literally under water at one point. The biggest bummer is no pickles and relish this year.

    I replanted but none matured enough for good fruit and now that the 50deg nights have set in they won’t. My broccoli and cauliflower all grew well but got ravaged by a woodchuck and I only got a few head of each. My fall planting is looking good and we will see how that does.

    Tomatoes were killer this year as always. I have picked about 60 pounds so far and spent all of today doing purée, jarred 2.5 gallons today all told. Got lots more still ripening on the vine and will most likely have to do this again next weekend.
    MiniBike likes this.