Got a Garden?

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by RustyStuff, May 31, 2015.

  1. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    What's this self watering thing.. The kids are growing some baby tomatoes, peas, and chives in buckets on the deck. But wondering if we can be better at it.

  2. TNWillie

    TNWillie Been here awhile

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    Hey Maggot. Check out this post from awhile back. It may provide an answer to your question.
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  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Been a good year here for tomatoes too. We eat a handful of cherries each meal. Lots of our beefsteak are now boiled down to sauce and in the freezer.
    Lots of peppers too. most go in stirfries or added to curries. My jalapeno has not been very fecund, not producing flowers but the existing fruits are developing well - needs more stress?
    Aubergines - best year yet. They won't survive outside here, but we are having to give them away.
    Good year for peas and beans of all types.
    And raspberries - far too many to eat or even pick.
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  4. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Self watering.... Depends on the size of your container (?) we can get water retaining granules, mainly for hanging baskets, but will work for anything. Just mix in with the compost.
    A little gadget that works is a replacement stopper for old pop bottles. Fill the bottle with water/and or a feed solution. The tops have a hole and spike and shoveit in the soil inverted - best hidden behind a plant. The water drips out slowly.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/CHICTRY-Au...TY2B4FR3PKP&psc=1&refRID=PQW143Z4QTY2B4FR3PKP
    Lots of brands available.

    Assuming you don't want to go to a full monty mains system yet.
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  5. PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 Been here awhile

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    For peppers I fertilize every 7 days. One week Miracle grow the other mist the plant with Epsom salt dilution (also good for tomato's). 1 tbls per gallon of water the pour into a squirt bottle and simply mist the plant. This helps set the buds and eliminate end blossom rot. Epsom salt is high in magnesium and give the plant a quick hit verses time released soil fertilizers.

    In the past doing traditional planting I would get nice fruit then a little black sot would form originally I thought this was from over watering (which it can be) but most of the time its a mineral deficiency. Since going to self watering planters doing the Epsom salt mist I have not had any loss to end blossom rot. Whereas before I has about 15 to 20% crop loss.

    This year once the plants are done I am going to dump the buckets onto the driveway mix in a bag of peat moss and a bag of tree bark mulch for some fresh organic material and also mix in the slow release fertilizers like bone meal. Then rebuild the planters and store in the shed over the winter so they are ready in the spring. After the plants are planted I'll go back to the 7 day fertilizer/Epsom salt routine. Next year I my try fish emulsion verses Miracle grow for the fertilizer? The good thing about this is my garden will grow by 1 bucket per year because of adding fresh organic material.
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  6. PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 Been here awhile

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    Self watering can easily be done in even a 1 gallon container but a 5 gallon is better. Simply mixing in water retaining granules in a sealed bottom container will not work as the soil will go anaerobic w/o oxygen. Poking a bunch of holes in the bottom of a bucket and using water retaining granules will work better as most of the water will drain out but this defeats the purpose of the water retaining granules.

    Self watering planters work because there is always a pocket of air between the water reservoir and the soil under the plant. With oxygen resent the soil does not go anaerobic and rot the roots. The wicking of the water into the rest of the container comes from the sides of the reseveiour. Peppers do not like wet feet and this method also eliminates overwatering or wet feet. The plant can also "suffer" to intensify the heat. During peak summer heat during the day you'll notice the plant wilting which normally people think it needs water. This is when most plants get overwatered. But wait until morning and look at the plant this is the tell tale. If its back to normal it was wilting/suffering because it was hot not because it was thirsty.
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  7. ArcticaMT6

    ArcticaMT6 Been here awhile

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    My big project over the winter/spring is going to be setting up irrigation. I'm converting the front corner of our yard over to a cottage garden style instead of grass, and I need to get water from the main across the driveway over so I don't have to water every couple of days by hand. Also need to set up drips in the raised beds to the left of the fence. Super old google maps photo attached. But first I have to cut down the jungle that formed over the beds from neglecting the garden when my daughter was born early overseas.

    Attached Files:

  8. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

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    Found this at a local Thrift Store a few months back. Too late for this season, but next year I should get a jump on planting/hardening off. I may try over wintering a pepper in it.
    It's not very large, 4' x 3' x 14"...

    Attached Files:

  9. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

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    I'm doing something along those same lines for a friend up on Camano Island in the next few weeks. She puts together a list of projects, and when she thinks there's enough cause, she rents me a car down here in Portland, and I spend a few weeks up there getting things done. I get to build a movable chicken coop to go in that area as well, so that one year it's on one quarter the next another and so on...
  10. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    We mix the water retaining granules in with the compost - I suspect Maggot's condition is closer to ours.

    Here's a utube of the self watering bucket
  11. jb882

    jb882 13HP of fury.

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    I have one of those i use it every year to get my starter plants going in the house in late Feb and it works very well. I would not expect that to work very well outdoors during the winter months, it will freeze overnight.
  12. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    ^Exactly so.

    Last place, a rental, the garden was mostly paved. We had a couple of those which function OK but we always tended to crowd them which is not so good.
    We found them rather fragile after a while.
  13. PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 Been here awhile

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    Here is this week's harvest off the 4 Reaper plants in the self watering buckets. This is the 5th harvest and still lots of green fruit waiting to ripen.

    Reapers.jpg
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  14. luckyjack

    luckyjack Adventurer

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    We have a small garden near the house where my wife planting trees mostly. An apple, plum trees etc etc With the time I became more intereted in gardening. Now each fall I help her to harvest fruits. I read about best ladders on https://abovethefloor.net/ and bought one for that purpose.
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  15. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

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    None of my reapers have ripened yet. Most are now the size of a ping pong ball...
  16. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Boiled down 2 crates of tomatoes today, and made a couple of quarts of roast tomato soup.
    We have picked perhaps half of the fruit, the rest awaits ripening, but the weather is turning. Cooler days, wet nights so every day is a bonus.
    We usually get blight by mid September.

    Also made a big pot of ratatouille yesterday, another couple of quarts of tomatoes gone. That also used some of the aubergines and courgettes and an onion or two. Apart from the olive oil and seasoning, it was all out of the garden.
    I used a Bon Apetit recipe, easy and tasty, a win.
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  17. PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 Been here awhile

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    The Reapers are interesting. They get about 2-1/2 long then once they start to ripen as they go from green/orange/red they shrink to about 1/2 the original length. Also once the 1signs of orange is spotted the pepper will got to all orange in a day or two. Then the orange color will darken over 3 to 7 days to a brilliant red.
  18. Da Bear

    Da Bear Twisted toy maker

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    Yeah, this is my third year growing them. Never had them get this large without at least a couple going red though. My Fatelii, Habenero, and Scotch Bonnets are still green as well
  19. doc4216

    doc4216 Chronic High Fiver

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    I have a mouse that has eaten every single jalapeno that both my plants have tried to grow. I have had very little luck with my poblano plants and not one single tomato. the tomato plant is actually looking good so Im hoping it will produce something this year.
  20. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Can't like a story about mice taking your plants.

    I am up here above the 52 parallel and our tomato harvest is almost done, along with most of the rest of what for us are "tender" plants. What time did you plant out tomatoes to not have fruit yet? Surely even the cool parts of California are warmer than mid UK.
    Also some varieties are much slower to produce fruit. We now grow three varieties to give us the maximum spread. Ukraine Purple arrives first, but is done by the start of August, and the fruit doesn't keep either on the vine or inside.
    This year our Marmande beefsteak type ripened earlier. A really good harvest this year, almost all picked and converted into sauce or kept, which it does reasonably well.
    An all time favourite is Gardener's Ecstasy, a development of Gardener's Delight. A cherry with a really good flavour, not too sweet so will cook well too. Nice refreshing acid balance. This year was a bit slow, but a prodigious cropper.
    Needs pruning to control vegetative growth or that's all you get, but easy enough. By mid August, I get pretty ruthless and strip off lots of the lower leaves, cut off all flowers as they appear and thin out so the existing fruit can get more sun and allow air to flow through the plant.