Gps noob and after 3 days, still can't do it

Discussion in 'GPS Tracks - West & PNW' started by Hebcon, Jun 10, 2019.

  1. Hebcon

    Hebcon Adventurer

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    Doing the WABDR soon and was given a Nuvi 2460. Can't for the life of me figure out how to load and view the tracks (map). I have everything loaded and working on my laptop using Basecamp and can move files to the Nuvi in basecamp but once I unplug the gps and turn it on all that is loaded is the waypoints. No tracks or routes. What am I doing wrong?
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  2. wonderings

    wonderings Long timer

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    How are you moving the routes to your GPS?

    When you right click on a track or route you should have an option "send to device". This brings up another window, might be a few options there but think default should be find, I know I never touch it. Click "ok" or "send" or whatever is equivalent and when that is done, unplug your GPS. Some devices you have to go to a load option in the menu, others just auto load the new files
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  3. pckopp

    pckopp Aged Adventurer

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    You are probably not doing anything wrong. I doubt the Nuvi can load tracks.
    The manual (pdf) is here: http://static.garmin.com/pumac/nuvi_2200_2300_2400_EN_OM.pdf

    Down on page 47 is a reference to loading GPX waypoints and POI files. This points to page 63 of the manual and there really isn't anything there.

    I think the best you can do with that unit is load a set of waypoints.

    You can take a GPX file that contains a track and waypoints and make a map that you can load. Not a trivial process but it does work well for these kind of GPS units.

    Good luck.
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  4. Hebcon

    Hebcon Adventurer

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    Thanks for the info! I've been beating a dead horse. Any suggestions on what kind of gps I should get?
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  5. Hebcon

    Hebcon Adventurer

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    I've tried to "send to device" and all it loads is waypoints then gives me directions from my house to there on major roads. It will not load the actual route on the map (The 6 legs of the wabdr) so I have no realtime to follow
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  6. pckopp

    pckopp Aged Adventurer

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    According to what I read in the manual the GPS is doing exactly what it is capable of.
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  7. pckopp

    pckopp Aged Adventurer

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    Really depends on your budget and techie inclination.

    I use Garmin stand alone units mostly because I have been using them since forever. My current bike GPS is a Montana 600 something. It is waterproof, fairly rugged, has a variety of mount options, and the mount powers directly from 12v from the bike. All good. I use tracks most of the time and I can load a lot of them. Not cheap, however. A quick search on Amazon or GPS City will show you the cost of entry. Probably at least $400 by the time you get all you need. The actual mount is pretty cheap so I have one on several different bikes.

    In the last year or so I have been using both Android phones and tablets with GPS apps, primarily Locus. The app is incredibly capable, it handles routes and tracks and maps easily. There are literally no limits to the numbers of tracks, routes, waypoints, etc. Locus isn't free, but is so cheap it might as well be. I think the Pro version is around $7. Comes with a couple state maps, but those are really inexpensive also. I bought 4 more states and still hadn't spent $20. Numbers approximate - it's been awhile since I did that. So even if you hate it you aren't out a lot of money. There is a huge Locus thread here in Maps and Nav. There are other apps and map packages that are free. OSM (Open Street Maps) is one of them. Like all smartphone apps, they each have strong and weak points. GPS apps are available for iPhones and IOS, as well. Gaia is one for iPhones, I think. Some folks here can ride all day on their phone battery so no need for power cables and USB adapters, though on a multi-day ride you would likely have to charge it overnight.

    In short you may already have a capable GPS in your pocket. You will need to mount and maybe power it and consider how you'll feel if you tip over in a stream crossing and drown your phone. I probably wouldn't use my only phone as my GPS tool.

    I mentioned before there is a PC program that will take a GPX file as input and create a map that will work on nearly any Garmin unit, including a Nuvi. I have a Nuvi 2597 and have used the map successfully. it is cool because the map it creates is transparent so your City Nav or Topo map will still be visible with your track and waypoints on top. Again, not completely trivial to use but it does work. Search for "gpx to img". There are threads here about it. I have it on a different PC and could probably send you a sample WABDR map.

    Good luck!
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  8. Hebcon

    Hebcon Adventurer

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    Cool, thanks for the detailed info!! I use my phone for short runs, but its hard to see in the sun mounted to the bars. I'm taking your advice and will look for a Montana and in the meantime ill try the transparent map thing w the nuvi. I'll feel much better on the wabdr w a working gps. Thanks again for your help.
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  9. Hill Climber

    Hill Climber Long timer

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    PM sent...
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