GPX FSE 450R

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by MBRIDER, Dec 21, 2017.

  1. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Reckon it's just an aiming issue? Seems like a lot of fender in that shadow. Might just need lifting up.
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  2. Woods Ridin

    Woods Ridin Adventurer

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    I wasnt saying there was an issue, i was just showing off how bright the stock light is, very usable. i should have worded that better.
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  3. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    Copied from the FB group. No idea on experience/skill but one of the first to comment on the 450.


    Hey GPX fans! I finally got my 2020 FSE 450R out for a real ride today: 55 miles of single track trail, fire cuts, dirt roads, whoops, sand, and dodging mud bogs/puddles! Overall the bike did fantastic. I used about half a tank of gas. Here are my observations:
    (1) Engine: clutch is settling in, I had to back it off twice to adjust out some slipping. Power was awesome, throttle responsive, resulting in a fun wheelie machine. 1 and 2 gear were perfect for tight trails - super tractor-ability, great torque (like my DR350, but better). 3 and 4 were great for tearing down dirt roads hair on fire, 5th too. 6th feels like a bonus gear - a dirt bike overdrive perfect for dual sporting. Pretty happy with the FI given the snappiness of the throttle, but it does have a tendency to flame out - with clutch pulled and I’m off throttle. Had this happen regularly, it was repeatable, and only immediately after pulling the clutch and off throttle. I’m going to try to adjust up the idle to tune that signature out until I can clean the fuel injector per Gary Goodwin recommendation. After the flame out, it always fires up immediately.
    (2) Suspension was great; it ate up the high speed whoops, but was a little harsh on low speed stuff. I already set my race sag, and determined the rear shock is too stiff for me ... I felt that in the forks too. I’m 152 lbs, and 172 lbs all geared up. I’ll do another post on all that. She’s good enough for now.
    (3) Fit/feel: amazing! Riding position on this bike fits me perfectly- love it! And the CST tires hooked up impressively well in the woods. Back tire won’t last long tho, it appears to be a soft terrain tire.
    The bike has 83 miles on, so far so good!!
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  4. Woods Ridin

    Woods Ridin Adventurer

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    I installed a 44T rear sprocket, muuch faster than the 52T. Too tall for single track, 1st gets to 20mph easy.
  5. GlennR

    GlennR Chasin' my tail

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    @Woods Ridin are you planning to mainly use your bike as a dual-sport or a woods bike?
  6. GlennR

    GlennR Chasin' my tail

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    @Navin, have you mounted up the sumo wheels on anything yet? I noticed you post anything about draggin' knees on a dirt bike yet. :ricky
  7. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    I ran them on my FSE250E Retro project bike. Incredible bargain with tires and rotors. The tires are good enough to beat on till they wear out too. The rear slides really nice, good feel and grip for budgety rubber.

    FB4D5161-5981-4504-A62D-4357479A8D31.jpeg
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  8. Woods Ridin

    Woods Ridin Adventurer

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    dual sport, I think if I do a single track trip I’ll just put a smaller countershaft sprocket in
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  9. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    On the EXC5XX KTMs I often ran a 14/48 or 13/48 with an 18" wheel and found it to suit a wide range of DS to enduro terrain very well. And a 14/46 was just an axle flip for 17" motard wheels. That was a very sporty ratio, (wheels up!). Id imagine the FSE would pull that very well also.

    Did it come with 14/52 stock?
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  10. GlennR

    GlennR Chasin' my tail

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    @Navin, by "axle flip" do you mean flipping the chain adjusters so to accommodate using the same chain?
    I've never tried 17''s and always wondered how much hassle swapping them back & forth with the dirt wheels would be. (I know some sumo setups have upgraded front rotors to deal with. But you probably wouldn't want that upgrade if planning to swap wheelsets often.)
  11. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    Yes, the standard off set KTM/GPX axle blocks are perfectly spaced for a 2 tooth sprocket swap (without adjusting the chain) if you set it up correctly. My last model year GPX 250R/250E lost that but it looks to be standard on the newest bikes again.

    The bigger brakes are addictive, theres a radial master, new hose and 4pot Brembo radial caliper with a conversion plate to fit my GPX on my shelf. Not sure when I will get to a full SM build but its on my list.
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  12. GlennR

    GlennR Chasin' my tail

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    That sounds cool. I don't know what "radial" means, but I'm sure you'll show us when you get to working on it.:beer
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  13. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    On the caliper it means the mounting bolts run inline with the bike rather than across it. But having an adapter defeats the benefit as my bracket is still mounted axially giving a touch of flex. If a set of radial fork lugs fall into my hands :viking .

    On the master its a pivot from the lever to the piston increasing leverage ratio. Modern sport bike stuff. One finger stoppie goodness.

    349EC243-8DFD-48FC-AEF2-CA6D074FCACD.jpeg
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  14. Woods Ridin

    Woods Ridin Adventurer

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    it comes with a 52 rear, i haven't gotten around to counting the counter shaft sprocket. I took it out on the road this morning with the 44T and got it up to 70 at about 5000 rpm. Never been that fast on a bike before, and not going to lie, i probably wont do it again. It was not comfortable and the bike felt too light for it, felt super out of control especially with the knobbies on, maybe with a motard setup it would be a lot better. She had a lot more in her, i have no doubt she would easily hit 90 wide open, if not more with the 44 on. 45-50 seemed the most comfortable to cruise at. Bike lugged a lot more in any gear but first (still pulled the soul out of me if you really gave it to her), all things considered about how i wanna ride, i'm going to throw the 52 back on. Ill keep the 44 just in case i ever have money to blow on a motard setup. Also got a flat this morning, so, looks like ill be taking the wheel off anyways.
  15. GlennR

    GlennR Chasin' my tail

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    I run Shinko 244's on my bike for dual-sporting. It's great on the street & okay on the trails. My 250cc tops out around 85 & feels okay, but starting to get light. That's probably about the comfort limit for a dirt bike for most of us. On a windy day, it will be a bit lower.

    Maybe you should balance your wheels. Knobbies are often run unbalanced, which makes them ride very poorly at highway speeds. You can DIY balance them using the axle suspended by something & just spin it by hand to figure out where the heavy spot is, then add some weight to the opposite side, and repeat a few times until you can't really locate a heavy spot.
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  16. Lawman_745

    Lawman_745 Adventurer

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    Video is finally up. I'll have some more soon! So far so good!
  17. Ogre_fl

    Ogre_fl Long timer

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    Great info, thanks for posting.
    On your next one could you give your impressions of the bike for on the road use?
    What kind of speeds it is comfortable running?
    Vibrations?
    Handling at speeds?
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  18. Lawman_745

    Lawman_745 Adventurer

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    Can do, just got my 45 tooth rear sprocket put on. I'll let you know how it does.
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  19. Bt10

    Bt10 Long timer

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    Dumb question, maybe. Couldn't the fuel tank be lightly heated and pushed in over the radiator hose to gain clearance? Seems easier and faster than designing and manufacturing a new neck.:dunno
  20. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    My 2 cents, its aesthetic more than anything else. The coolant flows fine and some are being run without any mods. Id still do the pipe chop, and they can pop out new parts like that and sell them in ebay for $10 shipped so not a huge thing. Changing the tank mold is a big deal, DIY Id still cut the pipe or leave it alone.

    I think, like frame gap, its just a thing people will pick out and "I toldaso" over. If it was out of sight it wouldnt even matter. The coolant runs thru everything and does its job.