GRIM - The '78 KLZ400 Adventure Chopper

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by JB2, Oct 11, 2020.

  1. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains

    Time in the shop has been minimal for the last few weeks but progress continues slowly. Some of the major decisions that need to be made before the frame goes back on the jig involve having the fenders... which I don't have yet. However, there is a ton of "piece-work" that can be done now like brackets, braces, triple-tree & risers.

    [​IMG]

    One of the things I wanted to get done was getting the brake anchor drilled with lightening holes. Lucky 7.

    [​IMG]

    All of the aluminum parts were finished pretty nice in stock form but they're going to be gloss black and the slight mold-seams they left behind will show. I used fine files and 80 grit paper on a sander to smooth out the edges and give them that organic look. The black works well as a guide coat because you can see the imperfections are gone.

    [​IMG]

    Next is the final shaping of the coil bracket. The elongated hole has been welded up and the new hole has been drilled.

    [​IMG]

    I will also remove the other weld-nut. When it goes back together these will be replaced with chrome acorn nuts.

    [​IMG]

    Viola! The coil bracket is ready for paint.

    [​IMG]

    Next on the modification list are the footpeg brackets. The Yamaha Scrambler pegs will not fully retract because of the height of the yoke. I need to remove this much on each one.

    [​IMG]

    The sliver removed, footpeg in the down position...

    [​IMG]

    ... footpeg in the up position, fully retracted.

    [​IMG]

    That's all but one of the 15 pieces that are ready for final prep and paintwork. The aluminum parts will get a trip through the bead blaster along with the footpeg mounts to remove the rest of the black paint. All but 2 of the parts will get painted gloss black and the brake pedal and anchor bar will get painted silver. They may get chromed at a later date but for the purpose of saving money where I can they look just fine painted.

    There not a better song to highlight the dysfunctional times we live in much less a dysfunctional Thanksgiving than Alice's Restaurant. Happy Thanksgiving! :photog



    Stay Tuned!
    #41
  2. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains

    Without the fenders I can still choose where to place the lower cross brace. The rear fender tab will be welded onto it and I already have determined the gap. The width of the tubing gives be an inch of error to place the fender bracket so I can proceed without any reservations, I think. :jjen

    [​IMG]

    Placing the brace in the approximate position posed a new problem. The yard stick represents the path of the chain. The front sprocket is centered over the rear lower mount of the engine and the gap between the center of the mounting hole and the bottom of the sprocket with chain equals 3" With the cross-brace in place it is setting at 4". The chain would need to run right through the center on the brace. ARRRGH! :p3rry

    [​IMG]

    If I move the brace forward enough to clear the chain it is out of range to use it for any purpose. :becca

    Well, cutting out a section is not an option. I could cut the brace 2/3 of the distance and miter a right angle or 45 degree cut to the square cross-brace. :scratch NAH!
    I would much prefer to have a continuous piece of tubing that was bent to do the same job. The only problem is the only tubing bender I have access to is Josh's. It works great on soft, open bends but not so much on tighter bends. With all the bikes in the salvage-shed maybe there is a piece of frame bent just right that I could cut out and repurpose?

    After an hour of digging and going through the scrap bucket still no success. I know I have something here that will work...

    I haven't looked up overhead yet... "remember when you bought out Carter's Indian/BSA and you got all of those crash-bars?" (talking to myself) AH! There they are! :happay

    [​IMG]

    It's 1" outside diameter X 1/8" wall. Perfect! A quick test-fit before I made the cut said with a little extra coping work this section was literally made for the job. Sometimes being a pack-rat pays huge dividends!

    [​IMG]

    After the initial cut I squared it up and marked the cuts and the coping lines.

    [​IMG]

    Much care was taken to get the fit really close on the first trim. Not much left except some fine-tuning.

    [​IMG]

    With everything fine-tuned and clamped into place the brace is a success. The chain will clear with plenty of room for deflection.
    It now gives me a perfect place to create a front mounting bracket for the brake anchor and the fender tab. The brake rod clears everything.
    The hardtail section added about an 1-1/2' of length to the wheelbase at the rear of the bike which will add to the length of the chain.
    The brace also looks as if it will create the perfect place to add a chain tensioner. Looking. :*sip*

    [​IMG]

    I had in mind to cut out a teardrop shaped bracket that would allow adjusting the position before welding into place.
    Also note that the brake rod is going to be too short. I could cut a sleeve and lengthen it but I'm going to do some scavenging to see if there might be something out in the shed that is the right length.

    [​IMG]

    Something like this.

    [​IMG]

    Almost done. Just a little more shaping.

    [​IMG]

    Test fit and... Viola!

    [​IMG]

    And, from the topside.

    It's nice to have a bike to work on in theses odd times. Hope y'alls are getting along great as well. COVID-19 has really spiked around here.

    Speaking of dysfunctional gatherings on this holiday here's another take by Ray Wylie Hubbard on James McMutry's "Choctaw Bingo" Seems almost fitting.



    Stay Tuned!
    #42
  3. Dryslick

    Dryslick Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    289
    Location:
    Lake Berkely, Montana
    Listened to Alice’s Restaurant this morning. One of my favorite Thanksgiving traditions. And Ray Wylie Hubbard, especially that song, is awesome. A little scary to think someone else has my rather odd taste in music.
    #43
    JB2 likes this.
  4. Wildebeest90210

    Wildebeest90210 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,277
    Nice work.

    #44
    panhead_dan, Jim K in PA and JB2 like this.
  5. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    @Dryslick - It's all good. I go to the church of Ray Wylie Hubbard at least once a week. :photog

    @Wildebeest90210 - Thanks. Nice cover by Steven'N'Seagulls. Had not heard that one.
    #45
    Bhuff and Wildebeest90210 like this.
  6. Wildebeest90210

    Wildebeest90210 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,277
    Bump...

    #46
    Bhuff, JB2, motu and 1 other person like this.
  7. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    @Wildebeest90210 - Thanks for the bump. All the aforementioned parts have been through the blaster and are awaiting paint. The two that were going to be silver got painted. 13 black pieces are next. Some pieces that I have ordered have arrived while others have not.

    Wife had a vacation the week of Thanksgiving and found out she would be working from home until at least after the first of the year. Major change in plans setting up a home office on the fly. I burnt a week of vacation to help her get set up at a moments notice. Secure, high-speed internet. New desk. Set up and running. Single screen not cutting it. New duals are ready for pickup the next day. Reconfigure desk...

    ...not enough room. :dirtdog

    Store bought desk has a 20" X 39" top but has a heavy duty frame. Light goes off so we purchased a 25" X 48" slab of butcher block to replace just the top. Stain and 4 coats of poly later it is ready to install after the recommended 4 day cure. I'll be putting that together Thursday evening but she can get by until then.

    So back on the bike... pictures to take and download but probably not until next weekend and the all the parts are painted.

    I was listening to this new guy a few years back and Larkin Poe came up in the recommendations several tracks later. Not sure why I haven't added the sister-duo to my collection but I've listened to the track you posted several times. Thanks. I like hob-knobbing with folks who have good musical tastes. :D Lincoln Durham is the guy I was listening to when Larkin Poe popped up.



    Stay Tuned!​
    #47
    Wildebeest90210 likes this.
  8. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains

    In this season of COVID things you don't think about come to the forefront. My wife Kim works for a local bank and they set her up to work from home back during the first go around with the virus. It was a pretty simple setup that she could use from the dining room table. However, a full day proved to be pretty uncomfortable but at that point she was only working one day a month to keep her home computers updated with the bank computers. That changed over Thanksgiving and even though she works in a private office they sent everyone in book-keeping to work from home indefinitely. Her original setup was a single screen unit so we bought a desk to give her a more permanent workspace. However, looking at spread-sheets on a single screen proved to be a challenge for her eyesight. They resolved the problem by setting her up with huge dual-screens.

    [​IMG]

    The result was good but the desk we had just purchased was suddenly too small

    [​IMG]

    The metal frame on the desk is sturdy and could support a larger, heavier top. We shopped for a butcher block and found a 25" X 48" X 1-1/2" unfinished top in stock at Menard's. A good sanding, 2 coats of stain and 4 coats of polyurethane later we have her new "command central".

    [​IMG]

    At this point I had 15 parts ready for paintwork. Two of them were going get painted silver the rest of them black. When painting black frames and most any brackets I use DP90 epoxy primer. I spray one coat and let set for one hour then topcoat with either a polyurethane or acrylic enamel. It is a great 2-step process and easy to touch up when the parts get nicked or scratched. Since the primer is black and the paint is black light scratches are easily buffed.

    [​IMG]

    I didn't take photos of the all the parts on hook but chose to snap a pic of the this clutch lever bracket. Note the screws, bolts and clutch adjuster in place. I clean the threads as a part of the paint preparation process. When painting I use donor/old screws(with clean threads) installed to prevent paint from clogging the threads. I also use the same screws when sandblasting to prevent damage to the threads. Also note the inside surface of the clamp is taped off. After the part is painted it is ready to install.

    [​IMG]

    When I got done with the 13 pieces that were getting blacked I had about an ounce of DP90 and an ounce of black paint left over. I went digging through the parts boxes to see if anything could be prepped in a hurry so as to not to have to dispose of mixed product. Viola! The front lower engine mounts were the perfect candidates and didn't need much more than a good sandblasting.

    [​IMG]

    Out of the sandblast cabinet and after a quick sanding with 80grit they're ready for paint.

    [​IMG]

    I have been a fan of DuPont's Imron for 5 decades now. I used to keep gallons of black on hand for just this application. However, the product has went through several changes recently and the price has went up accordingly. I tried this single stage, activated acrylic enamel earlier this year on a pair of fiberglass boat seats and was very happy with the results. It handles a lot like Dupont's Centari but is reasonably priced. Since this is my bike and not a customer's bike I'm going to give it a test run on the Kaw.

    [​IMG]

    On another note I use exactly 4 flavors of rattle-can paint. Cromax Self Etch Primer, Cromax Plas-Stick, VHT Wrinkle Black and Rustoleum's Silver Metallic. I really like the finish the Rustoleum produces. It almost looks like carbon steel that just came out of the blasting cabinet. Unlike conventional single-stage automotive paint I can put this stuff on thin and keep the thickness down(less chance of chipping & scratching). Here's the brake pedal and anchor bar ready for install. One coat of self-etch primer and three coats of rattle-can silver. These parts may later get chromed but for now they look just fine in silver.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the 18 pieces painted. The black parts got one medium-wet coat of DP90 and 2 medium-wet coats of black acrylic enamel. Again, I like keeping the thickness down to prevent chipping that happens with thick paint. Despite the lack of fenders and all the COVID crap that has been thrown at us I am still making progress on the bike.

    So in these unpredictable times I've done a lot retrospecting about the path I've chosen in life. Nearing retirement, looking forward to building bikes in my senior years and maybe make a buck or two. Who knows? I used to be crazy and wild and free. Still am to some degree but our world is changing. Just the thought process of compiling this post kept pointing to Ray Wylie Hubbard's "After All These Years". It is a biker song from the first chord. Enjoy.



    Stay Tuned!
    #48
  9. 3legs

    3legs Real men ride sidecars Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,170
    Location:
    Adelaide,South Oz
    I hear ya JB2. Before I retired ( 3 years ago almost to the day ) I rescued 17 motorcycles to restore after I retired.

    I've never been busier and it keeps the brain active but also the wallet empty but the satisfaction of seeing an old neglected bike back brought to new is a wonderful thing and the pain of the empty wallet quickly fades away.

    For me, I didn't intend to sell any of them however I've run out of room so 3 or 4 have to go although I am looking at ways of avoiding that.

    When I'm dead and buried and beating Barry Sheene around the racetracks in heaven ( yeah, right :lol3 ) my daughter can do what she likes with them and hopefully it will be a nice little nest egg for her.

    BTW those painted parts look great. I'm going to paint my next frame with POR15 instead of powder coating.
    #49
  10. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    @3legs - Thanks. I had 12 bikes just before winter hit. I sold my latest acquisition so down to 11 but I went to look at 2 yesterday and pretty sure they're going in the stable. There is a vortex in the very center of my garage and the vacuum it creates sucks in forlorn and forgotten Japanese motorcycles. My wife complains about it(tongue in cheek) but she knows it keeps me from other more nefarious activities. :nod

    I can't do anything about the vortex so I just keep making room. :photog

    Haven't tried POR15. Let me know how it works out. Never been a fan of powder-coating. It has its virtues but it has its limitations too. Sticking with paint.
    #50
    3legs likes this.
  11. Wildebeest90210

    Wildebeest90210 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,277

    Attached Files:

    #51
    Ginger Beard, Helibee and JB2 like this.
  12. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    Yeah.... kinda. Hardtail? Yes. Same clean lines? Yes. It spoke to me when I found the fenders. Not gonna turn out like anyone would expect. Note the “KLZ” designation in the title. Think milk crate(KLR). Stay tuned.
    #52
    Ozarkroadrunner likes this.
  13. 3legs

    3legs Real men ride sidecars Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,170
    Location:
    Adelaide,South Oz
    I've used POR15 on an unprepared sidecar chassis. You can brush it on and dries smooth but dries very quickly. It did start to peel off eventually but that was because I didn't bother preparing the metal. On purpose, was experimenting to see how good it was.

    Next time I will blast the frame but will still brush it on. Just remember to have a few paint brushes handy because they will clog up quickly.

    Oh and don't get it on your skin or clothes. Will take weeks to come off.
    #53
  14. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    10,449
    Location:
    Anchorage, formerly Spenard (hub of the universe)
    POR is funny stuff. I've had it peel right off of new steel that had been sanded and wiped repeatedly with acetone and paper towels until a white rag comes off clean. and I've also got some that spilled in the driveway 4 years ago... its stickin' like dog shit to a picknick blanket
    #54
  15. VX Rider

    VX Rider Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    7,317
    Location:
    Phoenix
    ALL paint does that....

    Gone from where you want it

    And won't come off of where you don't!
    #55
    3legs and JB2 like this.
  16. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    Truer words were never spoken.
    #56
  17. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains

    Not a lot of time spent in the shop with the holidays upon us. However, I did take a break and assembled the upper tree.

    [​IMG]

    The parts had dried long enough to assemble subassemblies like this. Once the tree is together it is done. It may go on and off the bike for several more mock-ups but it is the first item on the project that is done. Note the new isolators for the risers. I am very impressed with the quality and they are American Made. :thumb They are by a company called Clauss Studios. The NOS parts that are out there are overly priced and the rubber is no less than 30 years old. I've had fit and quality issues with aftermarket replacement parts before. I'm anxious to see what else they may be making for the little dirt bike. I am amazed at their offerings. One last note, the air tool oil in the background was for assembly of the risers. I put a very thin coat on the inside and outside of the isolator to help it squish properly.

    [​IMG]

    VROOM! VROOM! Early victory, if you will. Still a long way to go. New hardware coming for the riser caps and a new set of moto-cross bars will be about as far as I'll go with this sub-assembly until the final build. I used a "quick detailer" to clean my greasy fingerprints from the parts. No brand preference here, so long as it is free of silicone and contains no wax I'll use it. I'm probably going to start on wheel assemblies next. I still need fenders and Josh needs to finish his frame so I can get GRIM back in the frame-jig for more welding.

    With the ever boring selections on the boob-tube and in this time of COVID and stay home we've done some surfing on YouTube to watch documentaries and VLOGs. KB1(Mrs JB2) got on a Mt. Everest jag. One of the VLOGs that popped up was this one by Million $ Bogan called "Dangerous Harley Davidson Ride - India / Nepal / Mt Everest in 4K". Look up the Aussie definition of bogan. :lol3 Anyway, we almost turned him off 5 minutes into the first video. Curt, smart-assed, loud, naive and Aussie. So we skipped next to the video where he actually takes the helicopter ride up to "Level 4 Base Camp" on Everest. Well, it intrigued us enough to watch several of his VLOGS. His work is an acquired taste because he's got no sense of direction, he's harsh, annoying, full of reckless abandon, mechanically absent and honest. He's a helluva adventurer. After following his Honda Monkey Ride (powerful series)and the ordeal he's went though with his most recent offense against Harley Davidson we're really starting to like this guy. Enjoy... or not? :brow

    I couldn't end a post without a little music. I know I'm pretty damned crazy sometimes and I hope everyone I call friend is crazy too. Can't help but love this tune from Cody Jinks.



    Have yourselves a Very Merry Christmas! Build more, ride more! :thumb

    Stay Tuned!




    #57
    nuggets, Pezz_gs and Ozarkroadrunner like this.
  18. Ozarkroadrunner

    Ozarkroadrunner Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2014
    Oddometer:
    218
    Location:
    Georgia and Arkansas
    Clauss makes nice stuff. I bought a set of CL72/77 tank knee pads which were expensive but looked identical to the torn OG pads I removed.
    #58
    JB2 likes this.
  19. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,831
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains

    Lots of time spent with family and friends over the holidays but I did manage to finish one project and start a few others. Of course there were family members we did not get to see but I made the most of the four days off.

    [​IMG]

    New handlebar clamp hardware and new upper tree hardware was waiting under the tree for me from Mrs. JB2... and Z1 parts. Minus the new handlebars this assembly is now complete. The clutch adjuster and lever are also new. Jewelry.

    [​IMG]

    Also on my list was these items a new castle-nut for the rear axle and new brake shoes from Z1 Parts and Dennis Kirk respectively.

    [​IMG]

    The neck bearings/races, fork seals and wipers, top spanner nut came from Dennis Kirk and Z12 Parts via Santa. The bar-ends and grips were already in the pile of new parts I had been picking up. I still need wheel bearing sets for the front and rear, front brake pads, tires and tubes to start on the wheel assemblies.

    [​IMG]

    One of the other mock-ups I wanted to confirm was the routing and positioning of the coil. In an earlier post I had to modify the stock bracket. This is an aftermarket unit by Emgo that was installed by one of the PO's. It was mounted so the plug wires came out the front and wrapped around the frame in an odd fashion. With the brackets dry enough to mock-up I pulled the breather cap, which also serves as the top motor mount, from the rocker box and did a test fit. It is going to work just fine. So, I need something else to work on in the meantime. :loco

    [​IMG]

    When I went digging through the parts inventory to find that crash bar that I made the rear lower cross brace out of I found this. It is a vintage part from some manufacturer. It has never been installed and it looks to be the perfect crash bar for GRIM. The size and shape are probably what I would have made if not for having this. I can make the top bracket work but the lowers will have to be removed and new mounting fabricated. It appears to have been for a single, down-tube bike with the lower attaching to the front motor mount. I found a tag with a handwritten part number on it. Marvin Carter sold Indians up until the day they closed in 1953. He then switched to BSA and Triumph. The last years of Indian were English made vertical-twins. This fits something he was selling. The business closed in 1974, so it is pre 1974. Don't let the patina fool you. The chrome is flaking off but protected the metal well. There is absolutely no pitting and the rest of the chrome will be easy to remove. If I made one it would be black so no loss involved regarding the chrome.

    [​IMG]

    Mildred Carter made this tag. She was the accountant and parts manager. When you needed help with parts you saw Mildred. When you needed help with something or service work you saw Marvin. The only reservation I have at this point is, "am I modifying a part that is worth more money than the one I would have made?" Someone might be looking for just this part. I am going to research it before I commit it to the project just to see.

    Any vintage parts gurus for 50's era English bikes out there? :hmmmmm

    [​IMG]

    Then I clamped it on the bike and the bike wants it. True story. :photog

    This piece would add a bit of provenance to the build. Bill, the guy I got the Kawasaki from, and his son Jack helped me empty out the main shop when I bought the contents of Carter's Motors. The scale and dimensions are perfect and it will allow plenty of clearance for the skid plate and exhaust pipes. Still, I am going to look into its origins... first... maybe. :-)

    [​IMG]

    Other than some trade work with Josh I wiped the slate clean this year and only took on one customer job. A bike I had worked on last year needed a new front fender. Roy Brown bought this from Amazon for under a hundred dollars. I thought brand name was cool but when I flipped the box over to open it it said "Made In China". :fpalm

    [​IMG]

    However, the fender inside is roughly 16 gauge and formed pretty well. It does need some attention to the radiuses but is far cry better than this skirted and very heavy(over 20lbs) fender that came with the bike. The other thing about the new fender is it won't cover up that very flashy 21" front wheel. Roy with his mother flashing the ADV salute.

    [​IMG]

    It took about four washings with solvent to finally get the shipping oil removed but it is ready for some shaping. I also have a concern that I should laminate a plate on the inside of the fender where it attaches to the fork. The fender is heavy and a bit narrower than the wide front end. I steered Roy to Lowbrow Customs and he bought chrome spacers to resolve the issue instead of buying the expensive billet spacers from Kuryakyn. Even at that I still think it should have some reinforcements installed. There will be a lot of stress on those mounting points. 1/8" plate steel would fulfill the job without sacrificing much clearance between the wheel and the the fender bolts.

    The fender may need some work but I have to admit he got a pretty nice piece for very little money. :nod 'Nuff said. :*sip*

    So... GOOD NEWS FOLKS! While hanging this post I did some research on that part number. It is an Indian piece and the price they are listed for makes it so easy to decide it belongs to GRIM. :happay

    Check it out HERE. Way frickin' cool! Did you see that @reepicheep ? (AKA: Bill) :beer

    One of my "go-to" musicians for shop music is Chris Knight. I had his "Enough Rope" CD in the basement player and crank this song up every time I hear it. No, I ain't no musician traveling the road, gone for months at a time but the feeling of going home after being gone is something I can relate from an adventurer perspective.

    Crank this one up! :dj



    Stay Tuned!






    #59
    radianrider and Wildebeest90210 like this.
  20. Wildebeest90210

    Wildebeest90210 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,277
    Popped up on Instagram just now.

    Screenshot 2020-12-27 160510.png
    #60
    JB2 likes this.