GRIM - The '78 KLZ400 Adventure Chopper

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by JB2, Oct 11, 2020.

  1. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Thanks and props to your wife. My wife and I were talking the other day... when we have a bad day it's because spread-sheets wouldn't reconcile or there's a part found at the last minute delaying delivery of a vehicle. When they have a bad day... well, it really is.



    Funny how projects are lot like motorcycle adventures. It is never about the destination of a completed project, it's about the journey getting there. A cyber-friendship started on ADV. Meeting each others' friends and making them friends. A gift of a block of curly maple to guy who likes to build guitars across those friendships. A brother's saw to build them with. Lot of people and memories all packed into one adventure... er, uh... project.

    Hoping to head to Wheels Through Time in August to meet Dave Barr again. Should be before fall classes start. Just sayin'. Just ask @Bhuff if you should go. :nod

    #81
  2. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Well, I've been pretty much frozen out of my unheated garage and the projects I can get done in the basement are getting fewer and farther between. Lows near zero and highs in the teens. It was so cold today I had to make a tent over the air compressor regulator and put a space heater under it to keep it from freezing.

    [​IMG]

    I did have a handful of parts for the headlamp ears and pieces for the rear wheel assembly. I had very few good parts for the headlamp ears however I was lucky enough to find the rings that fit at the bottom of each ear. The washers and rubber isolators are NOS as are the isolators for the turn signals. The outer top-hats for the turn signals(in foreground) came with the ears as a Flea-Bay purchase but I have never liked the outer set-up so I'm using a pair of inner top-hats on the outside too. Two of the top-hats have perfect chrome, the second pair was pretty crusty. I will weld up the diamond shaped opening on the outside of each ear so that I can make it round like the inner. That set up will reduce the thickness enough that I can use the turn signals I prefer which have a shorter stem.

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    So these parts are going in the sand blaster after some finish work with sander and file. The ears will be black but everything else will be silver so I'll paint the silver this weekend. I will have to do the welding on Roy's fender and my ears at the shop where I work... where there is heat. :kumbaya

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    After a thin coat of etch primer and 3 coats of Rustoleum Brilliant Silver Metallic they are ready for building. I absolutely love that the paint looks like clean, white metal after sandblasting. The parts may later get chromed but for now this look is really appealing to me. It's cheap too which allows me to spend dollars elsewhere.

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    And this oughta make Joel happy... I noticed that on the bench next to Brutus were almost all the same parts that I have been restoring for GRIM so I sandblasted the brake anchor arm. It will get drilled next week before it gets painted silver. I'll be dragging other parts down to the basement shop to relight that project. This cold blast is supposed to last well into next weekend so garage work is on hold.

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    When I was a kid Dad and I would ramble around the countryside in his '64 Ford F100. The radio worked sometimes. When it did it was on a country station. When it didn't he would sing the likes of Marty Robbins, Hank Snow, Hank Sr., New Riders Of The Purple Sage... real cowboy music. I really like this kid, Colter Wall. His last CD was geared towards old cowboy music. I thought it so good that I wished he would have done more. Well, today, Sunday(?), Amazon delivered this. Colter's new one. It is a mix of traditional cowboy songs and songs of his own making. Several of these songs have been cut by the likes of Ian Tyson and Tom Russell. I especially like this one written by Marty Robbins. Doesn't really fit the build today but it was sure nice to have something new to listen to. Enjoy.



    Stay Tuned!
    #82
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  3. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Truer words are rarely spoken! :deal
    #83
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  4. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    All true.

    Glad to see Brutus getting some love too. Going to be a beautiful bike.
    #84
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  5. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    So I am frozen out of the shop for three continuous weekends. On vacation next week to cover a lot of ground in the shop and celebrate our wedding anniversary. There won't be any time gained in the garage with the temps but still plenty to do in the basement. I brought home some homework, if you will, from the day-job shop. We currently have a 1972 K5 Blazer in the shop getting restored. The poor thing has been painted numerous times over the years. The sheet metal is relatively easy to strip but hardware and brackets are not. Since I have a cabinet blaster I was asked if I could blast these while off playing house. :D I spent yesterday stripping a ton of small parts before putting them in the sandblaster. They are ready to blast but... no heat in the garage shop so I got my fingers crossed for just one day in the mid-20's to finish the blasting. No pictures taken but I cleaned up the basement bench after the Blazer parts this morning and jumped into a few loose ends on GRIM before picking my next move.

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    One fo the undone, loose-ends was the left footpeg mount. It took a breaker bar to get the original bolt out(center in the foreground). When we got it out it became apparent why. The threads are rolled over pretty bad. Not sure if someone intended to remove it and tightened it too tight, it wasn't cross threaded, it looked over-tightened. :fpalm I was lucky and found an NOS bolt on Flea-Bay. Next problem was to clean the threads inside the mounting boss. I got in about 2/3 of the way with a re-threader but it bottomed out on the worst threads and was starting to twist. I then sought out a tap(odd size: 12mm X 1.25). No body locally had one on the shelf so I ordered one from the tool man. It came in Thursday so I finished cleaning the threads up with the tap. Thankfully not very much material came out with the tap. Also good, the majority of it was repaired with the re-threader which rolls the threads back into place without cutting them. The new bolt screws in easily and has no wiggle. Good save and sure beats cutting off the boss and welding a new one on. :nod Or worse yet, the dreaded heli-coil. :puke1

    [​IMG]

    The other thing I wanted to determine was the indexing of the brake-anchor bracket that will weld to the lower cross-brace. With the wheel set in the center of the axle adjuster I used the geometry recommendation in the service manual to set the brake-anchor and brake-arm. I knew the hardtail section would add a few inches to the wheelbase but it looks from staging the brake rod it is around 4" too short. The book says the stock wheelbase is 53.9", now the wheelbase sets at 58". That brings up two new challenges. The first is finding a brake rod long enough to span the gap, sleeve and lengthen the stock one or make a new one. The second is to make the chain 4" longer I am going to have to add approximately 8" of chain. Makes me think a little stronger about implementing a chain tensioner. :hmmmmm

    [​IMG]

    This is the best side shot I could get in the tiny cubby-hole it is setting in the basement but you get the idea of the lines coming together. I had the sissybar mocked up today but did to take any photos. The sissybar will also have a luggage rack integrated that will run from the bar to the upper cross-brace. The rear fender will be suspended from the underside of the luggage rack. It will be much like the tail-section on a sport bike, not in looks but in function. It will only require the removal of 5 bolts and unplugging the rear harness to field strip the rear of the bike.

    I'm about as far as I can go on this mockup until I get a few of the critical pieces. I may tear it down and weld on the items that are set in stone. There is no good weather in the forecast until next week though so I'll be making a couple of trips to the day-job shop to weld up Roy's fender and the headlamp ears. I may also remove the rear wheel to start the restoration on it. :hmmmmm Not sure yet.

    I've had Colter Wall's new CD in the basement-shop Bose. I've really taken a liking to it but especially this song. Enjoy.



    Stay Tuned!

    #85
  6. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    We awoke this morning to a couple inches of new snow on top of all the snow we already have. I cleaned off both vehicles and took them out for a spin to blow off the residual snow. The sidewalk got shoveled twice before it stopped around noonish. Still no luck in the garage shop. I put up a tent over the air compressor and set up a heater. After 10 hours in the "heat" the regulator was still seized up with ice. It only hit the mid-teens for a high today. Soon the garage will be insulated and heated but not this year.

    The next round of snow was going to hit around 3:00 and even more snow coming in, 8"+ they say. Without air tools basement projects seemed out of the question so I rounded up the vintage electric tools. Something bugged me after I posted the last night. I missed an opportunity to get dual-use out of the brake anchor bracket. I should have added a tab/lobe to mount a spring pin for the brake pedal. Another thing that had me reconsidering the bracket was the fact I had cut it out of 1/8". Remaking the bracket also gave me the opportunity to up the thickness to 3/16".

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    I calculated the position of the lobe I was going to add to the bracket. It would become a boss for a 5/16" X 20 shouldered bolt. I will tap the hole and thread it into the anchor bracket. Like catching two rats in the same trap!

    [​IMG]

    I drilled all three holes and tapped the spring pin hole.

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    Then I cut it, shaped it and rough finished the edges.

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    I did a quick test fit to insure everything was good. Note the bolt still has a hex head but not for long. I've already starting knocking the bolt edges off on the bench grinder.

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    After I finished the edges of the bracket and finished out the bolt head to not look like a bolt head... :loco... I put it back on the bike. Mucho happy with the decision to remake the bracket. When the bracket gets permanently installed I will cut the excess part of the bolt from the back side but I will leave just over and 1/8" sticking through the back side and weld around it.

    Three hours later I emerged from the basement only to find roughly four new inches of snow with twice that yet to come. ARRRGH! I filled the coffee cup and headed back down to the basement-shop. This storm is supposed to last until well after midnight so there's no use at this point trying to keep up with the snow. I also have five gussets I can cut and now the I have the 'lectric tools scattered all over the place I've figured out what I'm going to do tomorrow. :nod

    Still listening to Colter Wall but after I came upstairs I realized this song fits the day..."Indiana winters..." And it reminds me of the journey the missus and I have been on for 44 years. Couldn't have asked for a better way to hibernate for a week.



    Stay Tuned!







    #86
  7. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    Your build is looking good. I haven't been working in the shop much lately... covid blues I guess.


    Here's my music find for the week:

    #87
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  8. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Thanks and GREAT find! Had not heard of him. Sounds and looks a whole lot like young Sonny Landreth like from the 90's. Here's an instrumental by Sonny. Similar, eh?



    Fighting the snow. Didn't get much done in the shop the past few days. Trying to make up for it now. Fingers crossed!​
    #88
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  9. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi Your Favorite Uncle Supporter

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    Something for when you want to turn it down...

    #89
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  10. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Really mellow. I wrote a poem to my Dad the same night he passed called Last Ride. Interesting to know if the instrumental he played was his own and/or if it ever had words. Always wondered if my words could ever be put to music. I checked his comments but seems to be no source on the song. Have to flip over a few more rocks. :nod

    Yesterday we ended up with approximately 10" of snow on top of the almost 10" we already had. Made for some interesting choices in where to put the new snowfall. You've heard of "Two Guys & A Truck"? And you might know the girls from Indy who have an HGTV show called "Good Bones"? Their business is called "Two Chicks & A Hammer". Yesterday I was "One Guy & A Shovel". :augie

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    The view out my garage door...

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    ... and the view from the side street.


    So today I've been knocking off some items on the "Honey-Do" list but managed to get a little time in the basement. I also ran the heater on the regulator to try to thaw it out. I just checked and have air for the first time in a week. Things are looking up!

    [​IMG]

    I did drill the brake anchor arm for the Brutus project. In fact I have a bunch of parts on the bench upstairs for that bike that I can work on. An update on that thread soon.

    [​IMG]

    After drilling I used this bit to clean up the holes from the outside. This anchor bar is considerably longer and thicker than the one on GRIM but the stamped rib in the middle is shorter so I only drilled 5 holes. As soon as I get a chance to get back in the basement I'll sand it for paint.

    All this guitar blues and riding' got me to thinking about this song...



    Stay Tuned!




    #90
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  11. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi Your Favorite Uncle Supporter

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    Yes, that's his own composition. As far as I know, there were no lyrics for it. A recording of it was supposedly used in a documentary on wild horses in Wyoming about 10 years ago.

    His real name is Ian Patton.
    https://www.facebook.com/boogpatton
    #91
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  12. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    [​IMG]

    The day after my last post we awakened to another lovely 3 inches of white fluff that put a nice blanket on all the work I had done the day before. We thought about putting the Christmas tree back up.

    After vacationing the week of our anniversary the weather turned good. Good as in it was above freezing for the first time in weeks and it was warm enough and rained enough to fairly reduce the amount of snow on the ground.

    [​IMG]

    A few weeks prior to the big freeze and numerous snows I made a template for Josh's wild Honda chopper...

    [​IMG]

    ... then cut and shaped the huge gusset.

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    After some final fitting and trimming it was ready for Josh to weld. He done that the weekend before the first big snow but I didn't take any pics.

    [​IMG]

    Sunday he came over and we removed the frame form the jig and did a final mock-up before I start the finish and paint work. He found a vintage Cheetah king-n-queen seat that needed fitted and drilled the fender for mounting. Also related to the fender; when he had it together the first time the rear tire rubbed the fender on heavy bumps. The Amen frame is equipped with vintage Indian style suspension. We raised the fender so that meant there are a whole set of holes to weld up now. Things that needed to be resolved BEFORE finish work. We also found the top tree is going to hit the coffin tank and relocated it back one inch then marked the neck for the fork-stops.

    [​IMG]

    It is not my kind of chopper but it's so cool to see the gears turning in his mind and the enthusiasm he has for old-school choppers. Almost everything he has assembled for the project with has come straight out of the 60's & 70's. From the outside edge of the rear tire to the outside edge of the front tire is 9'4". That does NOT include the rear overhang of the 6' sissybar which is over a foot!

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    Talk about the sissybar overhang... Josh made the sissybar in the same fashion he made the lower support on the backbone of the frame. In his words, "It's all about the look!"

    [​IMG]

    You can't see it but the dude is grinning from ear to ear. He's a member of several vintage chopper sites and has a cult following of friends.
    Sounds like there is more to the interweb than ADV. Who knew? :scratch

    [​IMG]

    With Josh's frame off the frame-jig it was GRIM's turn to get back on it. I can weld the lower cross-brace and the brake pedal mount along with three gussets. While it is apart for that I will get some other sub-assemblies done. The front fork and wheel will probably get the most attention until the next mock-up.

    It was really nice to have GRIM on the ground as a roller. I got my first chance to sit on it and am very pleased with the ergonomics. The seat will be sprung so it will set a little(a lot) higher than it might appear at the moment. But damn, look at those lines. If I can make the little 400 scream this will be a butt-load of fun to ride. It is definitely a throw back to my very first bike.

    Got another new CD. "No shit.", someone(or many) might say. But hey, I am addicted to music almost as much as motorcycles. Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit. ("the 400 unit" :lol3) This song is the first track and was written for me... or guys and gals like me. Enjoy.



    Stay Tuned!


    #92
  13. Tim_Tom

    Tim_Tom Long timer

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    That wild Honda chopper is definitely a look, but I'm more partial to the way the KZ is coming together. Really nice lines and should be a cool little ride. Keep it up, it's fun to see something a little bit different being built.

    Also HUGE +1 on Jason Isbell, their latest album (Reunions) is some seriously good listening. I've had it on repeat for about a month now.
    #93
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  14. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    @Tim_Tom - Thanks. Really excited where the little Kaw told me to go with the build. Should be a fun gravel-runner/dirt-bike.

    I go through cycles with music. I was first introduced to Jason Isbell through Wes Freed & Drive-By-Truckers. Long story short. I met Wes and we became friends through art and music. I have several of his original paintings in my home and commissioned him to do other original art. He in turn introduced me to DBT when Jason was still with them. Seen them in concert several times before he left the band. I tend to play catch up with my CD collection. I get hooked on a band or an artist for months at a time. When I change flavors I realize that some of my other favorite artists now have new CDs. I just got "Nashville Sound" and have a couple more to buy to catch up my Jason Isbell sets. If you've had "Reunions" on repeat for a month that's as good of a recommendation as there ever was. Sounds like we both have that "stuck in a groove" thing going on. :thumb

    A young Jason Isbell with the Drive-By-Truckers. He wrote the title track to this CD. Wes Freed did the artwork. Good memories from even better times.

    #94
  15. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi Your Favorite Uncle Supporter

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    "I'm more partial to the way the KZ is coming together. Really nice lines and should be a cool little ride."

    One Hunnid P on that from me, too. I think you're going to have a very cool looking bike you'll really enjoy tooling around on.
    #95
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  16. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    @Tanshanomi - Hey thanks. My mind sees it built but there's a long way to go with all the other projects in the shop.
    _______________________________________________________________________________________________

    Josh works 10 hour days, 6 days a week in a fab shop with a hour drive to and from work. He's anxious to get this bike done but adding another 30 minutes to my place and back each night... well you get the idea. I'm actually going to some fab work to complete the final details before it goes to the sandblaster. I also got the fender for Roy's Tri-Glide ready to weld. That will happen tomorrow night.

    [​IMG]

    One of the issues we ran into on the last mock-up was the tank needed moved back an inch for the upper tree to clear the front of the tank. By moving it back the tab he had welded on collided with the intersection of the backbone and the rear section raising the back of the tank about a 1/2". We marked the area that needed to be removed for a tight fit.

    [​IMG]

    A little work with grinders and a half-round it's ready for a test fit.

    [​IMG]

    Setting on the bike it fits perfectly. We decided to drill and thread the rear mount because the seat will fit flush against the back of the tank and completely cover the rear tab. Side benefit of the relocation. Next on the list of jobs is to finish removing the old studs off the frame and welding a new one for the front of the tank. But first, Roy's fender tomorrow night.

    I'm really digging the Jason Isbell CD. The song title finds you expecting something different. It also has hints that going through life is like a long, hard ride.

    "I broke a promise to myself
    To ride the throttle 'til the wheels came off
    Burn out like Molotov
    In the night sky
    I broke a promise to myself
    Made a couple to a brown eyed girl
    Who rode with me through this mean ol' world
    Never say die"



    Stay Tuned!





    #96
  17. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    With the weather turning good and being able to use of both the garage shop and the basement shop the weekend flew by.

    [​IMG]

    I started with trimming and finishing the trees for Josh's Honda. He picked these up for the project but they had a lot of "useless to him tabs", namely the ignition and gauge brackets.

    [​IMG]

    First, I removed the eyes for the gauges.

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    Then I removed the molded in bracket for the ignition switch but, to prevent damage to the part we wanted to save, it was done in three chunks.

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    Next, with 24 grit on a 3" grinder I carefully reshaped the front of the tree.

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    Using files, routers, Swiss files and sanders I finished the entire face and then removed all of the mold seams to give it a real organic look. Up to this point I have been using the black paint as a "guide-coat" to make sure nothing accidentally got an errant grinder mark where it shouldn't be. In this pic the tree is finished to 40 grit. Next it will go in the blaster before it gets hand-finished with 80 then 150 grit.

    [​IMG]

    The upper and lower tree ready for final finishing. The lower tree had a flat boss, probably for a brake junction, that I removed. The threaded hole with be filled with a button weld. I also cleaned up the mold seams from the rest of the piece like the upper tree. It should be noted Josh is not running a speedo(tach only), no front brake, no turn signals, no ignition switch, one mirror... "It's all about the look!" :lol3

    Also on the "got done" list was we removed the tubes, tires and wheels bearings from his Satellite rims and sandblasted several other pieces going out to the chrome-platers. I also switched the welder over to .023 wire for some sheet metal work.

    [​IMG]

    Roy's fender was first on the welding list. I set up the work by clamping it to a sheet of 3/16" plate-steel. I needed to prevent warping and distortion from the button welds and I was trying to get a dip out of both sides where it's drilled for mounting. By clamping the 1/8" bracket to the 16 gauge fender on the 3/16" plate I was able to remove the dip and minimize the distortion. Win, win.

    [​IMG]

    I didn't get pics of the welding setup because the clock was ticking on the weekend but here it is after finishing and re-drilling his mounting holes. There is some mild distortion but it is minimal. The blue piece of tape marks where there was a nasty dip on both sides. The skirts of the fender have heavy forming marks from the stamping die.

    [​IMG]

    The fender is going to require some bumping a filing to get the top of the fender smooth. The circle indicate a lump but should metal finish nicely. Otherwise it is surprisingly straight compared to the skirts of the fender.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the forming marks I mentioned. Even the photo doesn't tell you how it feels when you run your hand over it but the marks litter both sides. It's going to take a skim-coat of filler on each skirt but at least it will be very thin.

    The Jason Isbell CD caused me to dig out some old Drive-By-Truckers. I thought about how wild Josh's bike is going to be, his wide-eyed plunge into the early days of choppers and if 25 years ago he pulled up to take your daughter on a date on the Honda. :photog

    "I got 350 heads on a 305 engine, I get 10 miles to the gallon, I ain't got no good intentions"



    Stay Tuned!





    #97
  18. Ozarkroadrunner

    Ozarkroadrunner Been here awhile

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    Great job on cleaning up those clamps. Probably the best I've ever seen and I have seen a lot. Here's an AMEN 750 I built 20 years ago.

    Attached Files:

    #98
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  19. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    "Great job on cleaning up those clamps."

    @Ozarkroadrunner - Thanks. And, you must know that to get this level of finish takes hours of tedious work. I wish I would have taken pics last summer of Josh's Honda. It looked a lot like your bike in the picture but then he decided to goose-neck the frame and install a much longer fork. I also notice you had the "Keyhole" carbs. He's looking for a set to replace the ones that came with the motor he bought for the project.
    #99
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  20. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    More progress in the shop as the week went by but mostly on other's bikes.

    [​IMG]

    First on the list was Roy's front fender. I started with the knot on the left side. I used the heavy pick hammer and the "C" dolly to begin working the knot down and hopefully shrinking it enough that I could metal finish it. The trick is to find the part of the dolly that fits the contour the best then hold it against the back side with light pressure while tapping the high spot down. I give the pick a solid place to make contact but allow the dolly to bounce when struck. The pattern of slight dimples left behind resembles the pattern of a shower-head. Next I use the same dolly but switch to a planishing hammer and also hold firm pressure against the backside and work the surface smooth again. The with a large half-round file, on the flat side of course, I cross-hatch the surface to see if it is gone and to start the final smoothing. This is the first go=around. I'll repeat the process again to get it perfect.

    [​IMG]

    This is after the second go around and you can see it lump is gone. It seems like a lot of work especially since the skirts of the fender will have to have an ever so slight skim-coat of filler. If you look closely you can see the ripples in the skirt. In one respect it is a shame to have to put any filler on it but in another this fender is pretty nice for a $79.00 Chinese piece from Amazon.

    [​IMG]

    The left side with a coat of Icing. Note, I keep old hobby knives around to clean bolt-holes out after filling The trick is to wait until it is "tac-free" but still soft and carefully clean the holes and the edges. It is a lot easier to do it now that after it is completely cured.

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    The right side after sanding. Now the fender is ready for priming and blocking and should be ready to paint by next weekend. Progress.

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    While there was no progress on GRIM he served as a fender rack while switching back and forth between Roy and Josh's fenders. Speaking of GRIM and fenders; I had contact with Joe Cooper of CooperSmithing Co. The rear fender I purchased was a standard piece. At the time it was only available as a rear fender but he kindly took my dimensions and made a "one-off" fender for the Kaw. I'll have them in a few days.

    Can't tell you how excited I am... :happay

    And if there wasn't another oddity added to the CooperSmithing connection I got an e-mail from Janus Motorcycles. They were getting ready to reveal their new Halcyon 450. Grim is a direct result of spending two weekends at their place in Goshen, IN for Discovery Days. I really like the Halcyon 250 but felt like was under-powered for serious or long-distance travel. When Bill (@reepicheep ) offered the KZ400 I decided to build the JB2 version of the bike I really wanted.

    So I watched both videos that debuted last week. In the fourteen minute version guess who they sequestered for making the fenders on the new Halcyon? Joe Cooper. He taught them his techniques and now they are making their own fenders in house using his methods. How cool is that?

    Take a few minutes to watch this one. I think Janus has really upped their game. New KLR or Halcyon 450? :hmmmmm




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    Also getting attention was Josh's rear fender. This fender has been with the bike since it was born in the 70's. It has exactly 25 different holes in it; 19 are welded shut while 6 are hopefully permanent. :augie It is very rough. Beat up, rode hard and put up wet. The entire surface has about an 1/8" of bondo and numerous paint-jobs. I would have preferred starting with a new fender but Josh wants to keep this piece with the bike. While I will sand off a good bit of the paint I had no desire to strip it and have to completely re-mud it. It is beyond ever making straight again without using filler. In this pic I have ground out the mud for welding, welded the un-used holes and filled the area with heavy-bodied Rage filler. After it is completely blocked and most of the paint removed I will put a coat of Icing on for the finish work. I'm not a fan of working with parts that have this much bondo in them but I get why he wants to kept with the bike. Make it straight and paint it and try to forget what is underneath the finish.

    Sorry this about to get wordy...

    An observation I have made about Adventure Rider is there are so many facets and threads that most people, myself included, tend to find several they identify with and mostly monitor those pages. Mine consists of "Some Assembly Required", "Day Trippin' " and the complete "Photos" forum. I make it to JoMomma now and then but that is about it, it's all that I have time for.

    So back in 2012 I found a video called "It's Better In The Wind". I got hooked on it. Watched it a half-dozen times the day I found it. The next day I pulled it up again and one of the videos that came up in the recommendations was Trevor Ware's "When Were You Young?". Damn! Two home-runs in a row! I was happy to find this kid out doing it on the road, on a bike spending three years in the wind. I searched for more content by him but that seemed to be the only thing he had. Did he drop off the face of the earth? At any rate, I can't tell you how many times I've watched the video, posted it and turned other riders on to it.

    Fast forward to two years ago. I made a pass thorough JoMomma one day and found a thread about Trevor Ware. It seemed that shortly after the release of the video he was rear-ended, or more accurately, ran over on the interstate late one night and left for dead. @dogjaw had posted the video below along with links to the accident, the capture of the perp and a letter writing campaign to keep the offender in prison to serve his full 20 year sentence. I also discovered he had a prior conviction of vehicular manslaughter in Indiana no less and had been released from prison early for "good behavior". He had pending charges of DWI in Arkansas the night he hit Trevor. Not only was I shocked to read the horror of the the events I discovered that I had never known he was an inmate here on ADV who went by the @kerncountykid. Who knew? Obviously not me.

    Trevor has been on a long road to recovery. Just living past the accident and all of the surgeries is amazing. That he is now married and expecting children is amazing since all of the odds were against him. His life will always be a struggle. There have been a ton of inmates who have donated time, money, a sidecar rig and love to keep him going and to let his family know we care.

    Two years ago I was one of many who wrote the Arkansas Parole Board and was able to prevent his release. We, as a community, succeeded. Now, two years later the man is up for parole again. As a motorcyclist, a builder and a passionate traveler I would urge you to visit this PAGE, read it, read Trevor's words(he's a gifted writer) and get involved. Dogjaw has provided a link so you can electronically send "request of denial" directly to the parole board. I can tell you all the letters are read at the hearing and once again the family will have to travel from the great NorthWest to Arkansas to prevent the repeat offender from walking.

    If you don't dig this video you probably don't ride. Enjoy!



    Stay Tuned!