GrizzLee Stories from the North

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by GrizzLee, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    Thanks guys...

    I am loving the Rallye.

    Currently at Happy Camp in northern California. If you've never been on the stretch between willow creek and Happy Camp... OMG. ... it's an awesome ride. So scenic, mountains and twisties, sunken grades and no warning signs. Oh, and bigfoot country. I spotted 3 of them yesterday... all static displays.


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    #61
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  2. toowoomba

    toowoomba Certified BMW Therapist MCCL Supporter

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    I'll add that to my route - Glad you're enjoying your trip and the Rallye is treating you well. When you do finally come across the real thing, Big Foot, don't make eye contact... Continued safe journeys and continuing great weather.
    #62
  3. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    Ok folks, getting back on track here. A new video.


    GrizzLee Stories From The North: Episode 5 - Finishing the Canol Road

    A little out of Sequence.
    Continuing from Episode 4.....

    Going back out the Canol wasn’t as exciting as it was coming up. Time constraints, and the rain just dampened the mood. It was turning out to be a very wet summer up here. The Yukon interior is usually pretty dry and arid in the summer. Perhaps climate change was the reason. This type of weather would haunt me for most of time on this trip.

    My next destination… Dawson City, The Dempster Highway and Tuktoyuktuk

    #63
  4. Mcgee

    Mcgee Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks again for the great video! To bad it was so wet. I might have missed it, but what month were you doing this ride?
    #64
  5. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    I left my home in Arlington, Wa end of June. So I was there 1st or 2nd week of July.

    2nd time there. 2nd time I experienced rain :-( As you can tell by my report, it was pretty wet up there June and July. Most unusual for the Yukon. The interior is pretty arid with thunder storms rolling in and out. But nothing like the consistency I experienced on this trip.
    #65
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  6. BCBackRoads

    BCBackRoads Travels with Gumby

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    Hi Grizz

    I'm a bit late to the party. I just finished viewing episode 2 and in spite of your misfortunes with the tires and all, your still producing outstanding videos. I've got a lot of catching up to do and I'm looking forward to more.

    Cheers, Wayne
    #66
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  7. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    That's the beauty of the digital age. You can binge watch everything. Grab a beer, make some popcorn and make an evening out of it. :lurk

    Thanks for joining me on this adventure. I have to make my way back to kelowna for some bar-b-que and a beer.

    Cheers mate. :beer
    #67
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  8. BCBackRoads

    BCBackRoads Travels with Gumby

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    You're welcome any time my friend. I've taking some time off this summer so if the stars align I may be able to join you for a few days if you come up this way.

    I'll keep the fridge stocked. Wayne
    #68
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  9. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

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    Thanks Lee. Updates always appreciated.
    #69
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  10. Bob Benton

    Bob Benton MotoBob

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    Many thanks Lee. Cheers!
    #70
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  11. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    Grizzlee Stories From the North: Beyond Dawson City

    So I left Dawson City in the afternoon after checking out Gold Bottom, Solomon’s Dome and the Midnight Dome. All great places to ride to with history and scenery to keep it interesting.

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    Top Of the World views

    I once again, took the ferry across the Yukon River at Dawson to tackle the Top of the World Highway. Weather started out pretty good and I was thinking that hey, maybe, just maybe, I can escape the rain for a day. And I did initially. However, Mother Nature wasn’t going to let me off cheap today. She decided that while I was riding the nice compacted dirt road of calcite, that it was time to fool with me. And so the skies opened up again for another spanking of rain. She let me have it. I had to eventually pull over to a pullout and wait it out as the road got greasy and worse yet, the high humidity wouldn’t allow for my helmet to be fog free. I was essentially riding blindly through the greasy mess.

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    Wet, but not beaten at Poker Creek Alaska. Population 3

    I waited it out for about ½ hour and the elusive sun appeared long enough for me to grab a snack.

    From there I was able to witness the 1st Nations folks harvesting a Caribou. From the distance, I saw a herd upon the ridge, when I got below them, I could see the natives had shot one and were loading it into their truck.

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    I made my way to the Yukon/Alaska Border crossing, known as Poker Creek and the rain gods pissed on me some more. I then followed the US side of the border for about 18 miles or so of new pavement. WOW, I thought, this wasn’t here last time. I was riding along at a decent clip when I had to brake abruptly. Another herd of Caribou had decided to blindly cross the road in front of me. They seemingly appeared out of nowhere. Form thee, I had a wet ride all the way to Chicken Alaska. I pulled in and got some of their free coffee and mingled with a couple of other riders. A father/son team that just got off the Dempster. They had an interesting riding up to Tuk. It seems they rode up to Inuvik in one day. Spent the night there and made a run out to Tuk and then came back to Dawson city in one day!! They stated that ti was so wet and miserable, that they just wanted off the road. This gave me good confirmation that I had made the right decision by waiting.

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    On my way to Chicken... Views galore in between rain showers.

    From Chicken I rode to Tok. While the road was paved, it was very rainy and lots of sunken grades. I almost got clobbered on more than one occasion by big semi trucks cutting the corners in the turns to avoid the sinking grade of the road. It was actually pretty dangerous. I approached each corner with the utmost caution. When I finally hopped on the Alcan Hwy to head for Tok (~12 miles or so I believe), I got dosed with a continuous cold down pour. My plan was to camp in the Eagle Claw campground, but I was shivering and soaked to the bone when I arrived at Fast Eddies in Tok. I checked on the availability of a room at Youngs Motel (owned by the same folks) and got the last one. I happily paid $100 to get out of the cold and take a warm shower. Afterwards I made my way to the restaurant and had the all-you-could eat salad bar and a beer. The father/son team pulled in on their KLRs and we had a nice visit.

    The next day was still wet. I made my way toward Fairbanks in mixed weather. My goal for the day was to end up at the University of Alaksa Fairbanks and claim a dorm room. Along the way, in North Pole Alaska (yes, this is a real town up there outside of Fairbanks), I met up with another group of riders that had come off the Dempster. They made it as far as Inuvik … barely they stated and turned around the next day because the conditions were so awful. Their story included staying in a maintenance camp after experiencing many falls/crashes from fatigue. They stated that folks are not normally allowed to stay at the camps, buts the crew opened their garage and let them spend the night in it. The gov’t workers, brought them pizza and fired up the stove. They said it was downright cozy and a godsend for them. A pretty miserable experience for sure.

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    Greetings from North Pole Alaska ... I asked Santa for Sunshine

    I arrived in Fairbanks still concerned about the weather. I was able to get a dorm room at the University for $40 for the night. This is a bargain and I loved staying there. They have free internet and laundry included with your stay. The best part is, it is a mecca for other like minded riders of my ilk. I met up with a guy from Texas, riding a GSA like me and we went to dinner at the Pump House Restaurant on the Chena River. We got a table outside and basked in the rare evening sunshine with a local brew and a steak. It was the best meal of the entire trip and well deserved.

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    Drying out in my Dorm Room

    Back at the Dorm, I checked the weather conditions on the Haul Road (aka, The Dalton Highway) going north toward Prudhoe Bay. The weather seemed OK. Nothing out of the ordinary for this time of year. But the word on the street was, that they have been experiencing very wet conditions up there as all summer.

    So, the next day, I packed up my bike and headed out towards Prudhoe Bay on the Dalton Highway.


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    So I had one question on my mind; Will the rain gods continue to pummel me?
    Stay tuned....
    #71
  12. eemsreno

    eemsreno Super Tenere Rider.

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    Great report Grizzly!
    I'm a big fan of that North Canol also. Just fantastic riding but it really helps if it's sunny.
    #72
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  13. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    Everything on a bike is better with sun. Doubly so for the canol.

    I must say this though. My video doesn't do the canol justice. The northern mountains at Mac pass are spectacular.
    #73
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  14. cptnwightwen

    cptnwightwen Been here awhile Supporter

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    I've been at that sign three times and I still want to go back. Less than a mile further and the pavement runs out and the gravel greets you on and off (mostly off) to Dead Horse. I love it.
    #74
  15. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    Ok, you getting ahead of me. You are correct though.Hang tight and you'll see what i experienced beyond the sign... it's a different experience every time.

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    Father son ride in 2013.

    Hot as heck too. 2013 Temp in Coldfoot.
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    #75
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  16. Phoenix101

    Phoenix101 Long timer

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    Grizz on the 1200 what did you run for tire air pressures on the dirt?
    #76
  17. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    The road , for the most part, is hard packed. So I run with recommended tire pressures.

    With that stated, I ran into folks who were riding the greasy parts in rain mode on their GSs. These new electronic ride modes work really well .
    #77
  18. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    GrizzLee Stories From the North: The Haul Road

    I got up early and left Fairbanks heading to the Dalton Highway. I made pretty good time, even with a stop for coffee and some breakfast.

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    At the start of the Dalton Hwy is an elevated sign signifying the start of the road. The elevated sign was presumably to keep folks from plastering stickers all over it and defacing it. Somehow, many travelers are undaunted as the sign is still plastered with stickers from folks of all walks of life. The town of “Livengood”, yes, you read that correctly, is nearby. There is such a place and a name. Apparently, its' population has dwindled to only a handful of folks now.

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    From there the weather was ok. The road was in excellent condition. I endured a few sprinkles here and there all the way up to the Yukon Crossing at Mile Post 57. I stopped at the visitor’s center and spent some time looking around and even going to the beach to dip my toe into the Yukon River.

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    Yukon River... Beeeutiful

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    Yukon River Crossing

    Afterwards I headed north to get gas in Coldfoot. Along the way I would cross the Arctic Circle and so forth. The weather gods were being nice and in fact, I got a nice break in the weather as I came upon finger rock at MP 98. Finger rock sits upon a high plateau above the tundra. It is rather unique as the ground is not soft and spongy. Lots of granite rocks lie scattered about for miles and miles. The rocks are pushed up as water freezes and expands underneath them in a process known as frost heaving. One of the biggest and most unique of these rocks is Finger Rock. It stands like a beacon on the plateau and can be seen from many miles away.
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    Finger Rock... A Beacon on the tundra

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    Looking North form Finger Rock

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    Gretchen

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    From there, it seemed like a short ride and I arrived at the Arctic Circle (MP 115). The weather gods were being nice to me. Sunshine mixed with filtered sunshine was the weather menu for this evening.

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    From the Arctic Circle, it didn’t take long and I found myself in Coldfoot another 70 miles or so north. It is here, north of pump station number 5, where I refueled. I was able to slip in and get in on the all-you-can-eat buffet. Coldfoot is an oasis out here in the wilderness. I met a few folks, including some riders coming back from Prudhoe Bay. They said the ride was wet, cold and rainy. In fact, they stated that it was snowing at Atigun Pass. I decided then and there that I’d only go as far Atigun Pass and then turn around. It was now about 8:00 in the evening. I left Coldfoot thinking I would ride as far as I could into the evening sun and then turn around and camp at Marion Creek, a designated campground about 10 miles or so north of Coldfoot.

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    Arctic Inter agency Visitors Center at Coldfoot

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    Stuffed animals on display :-(

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    Marion Creek nestled in the heart of the Brooks Range

    As I made my way north, the sun was shining and the skies were clearing. It was GORGEOUS. I kept riding in the magical light with very little traffic. I think I saw only 2 trucks for the rest of the evening. The sunlight was splendid. A few miles before milepost 204 I could see Sukapak Mtn and it was a religious experience that I will take to my grave. I made several stops and had a hard time pulling away from its beauty. The warm sunshine and the total stillness of the air was incredible.
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    Incredible Evening Light

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    I slowly made my way to the Deitrich camp and bridge. Lots and lots of beauty here in the mountains. Mountains formed of limestone, pushed up from the ocean to form the Brooks Range. Absolutely stunning. To my dismay, it looks like they are paving this section of the road. Interesting to see if it can be maintained with all the frost heaves and such.
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    I saw a few moose, and before I climbed up to the Chandalar Shelf, I witnessed 100s of hares on the road. As a result, the birds of prey were swarming in near locust-like fashion. I was wondering if I was to camp here, if I would see wolves coming to feast. I have never personally seen so many long eared hoppers gathered in such density at one place.

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    As I rose in elevation, it started to get cold and I could see dark clouds just swirling. I was told that it was snowing earlier in this area. Sure enough, the road became a bit squirrely the higher up I went and fresh snow began appearing. The area just got a fresh dusting from what I could tell.

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    At the top of Atigun Pass I had a small celebration and victory dance. It was now near midnight and I had sunshine mixed with dark clouds. It was quiet and beautiful. My adrenaline was pumping as I hopped on my bike and went down to the valley on the other side. For a few brief moments I gave thought to making a run out to Prudhoe bay, or at the very least pulling in at Galbraith Lake (MP275) and spending the night. However, with the threat of snow and the greasy road, I turned around and went back to Marion Creek, about 10 miles north of Coldfoot. I was exhausted but was filled with giddiness beyond belief on my experience. I believe I made a good choice, as I encountered bits of drizzle on the way back and the sun gave way to overcast and clouds. The temperature dropped and I setup camp well past 1:00 am.

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    Looking South of Atigun Pass

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    Twin Peaks rising off the Chandalar Shelf

    All tucked into my tent and sleeping bag, I was awakened by 2 motorcyclist pulling in around 4:00 am. I would find out more about these folks tomorrow…
    #78
  19. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    GrizzLee Stories From the North: Sunshine Finally!!!

    BRAAAAPP! This was the sound I heard at 4:00 am as 2 bikes pulled into Marion Creek Campground. I wish I could say that I was in a deep sleep dreaming about my ride a couple of short hours ago, but the truth of the matter was, I didn’t sleep well. Maybe from the adrenaline rush; maybe from the midnight sun; maybe just my body being confused and dazed from riding almost non-stop form Seattle for nearly 2.5 weeks now.

    I tried to fall into a deep sleep, but couldn’t. So around 8:00 am, half awake, I packed it all up and headed back to Coldfoot. I refueled the bike and got a cup of coffee and a scone. I met up with some interesting ladies, whom I met the day before, who were traveling from the Kenai Peninsula area, which is where they lived. Interestingly conversation followed… one of them got married on the Dalton Hwy in the late 70’s and spent her honeymoon trekking the in the Brooks range starting at the Chandalar shelf. It seems that her husband, now retired, takes off every year with his dog and lives the entire summer in the bush. She stated that she has a general idea where he is at, but only hers from him when he needs to come out for supplies or such other life necessities. Wow, I thought to myself. These ladies make life in the lower 48 seem so … well... boring and unimaginative.

    It was during this time that Chip and Joe, two fellow advriders I met earlier in my travels on the Cassiar highway, pulled in. Now, I had been in touch with them now and then during my trip via email/txt. I knew they were going to Prudhoe Bay, but I thought they would have been long gone by now. It was a great time to exchange stories and tales of our experiences. It seems that their trip up to Prudhoe was a bit miserable and they ended up staying up there more than a couple of days and then came down to Wiseman, north of Coldfoot the previous day.
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    Moose Cow... She had a calf stashed in the brush behind her

    We all left together, riding back to Fairbanks. Our destination, the University of Alaska. Chip needed to do some bike maintenance and I personally enjoyed the riding company. So that is what we did.

    Along the way we had spritz of rain and constant cloud overcast, but the road was dry and it wasn’t too cold or hot. We pulled off the Dalton hwy near finger rock for a break and I noticed a thin wire (like a wire from a ply tire, no thicker than a couple of strands of hair) was sticking out of my rear wheel. I thought nothing of it and pulled it out. To my surprise is was about 2 inches long and had penetrated my tire… the sizzling sound of air leaking out of my tire was all too familiar. I suddenly had flashbacks of my rainy experience on the Cassiar Hwy earlier in my trip. Whereby I rode nearly 100 miles on my flat tire to get help. This time however, it was a pinhole and not a big cut. Fortunately, a tire plug and some air were all that was needed and I was on my way again. In fact, the plug and the tire held up just fine for the rest of my trip back home.

    We finally made our way to the Yukon crossing and had a nice lunch. It was here, that I met up with the bikers that came into the campground earlier that morning. One of them, a gentlemen named Yun, had a spill on the road that caused some damage to his bike. He bent the sub frame and appeared to have destroyed his pannier. A fellow rider he met was carrying some of his gear. The problem for Yun, was that he was on his way to South America. So he needed to get this fixed for the remainder of his trip. In any event I was able to give him Adventure Cycleworks contact info and that was that. I figured I would never see him again. Turns out I was wrong… more on that later...

    Chip, Joe and I arrived in early evening at the university and got our rooms. Chip got his bike repaired by Dan (Adventure Cycleworks)… Side note. Dan came by the University took Chips’ rear wheel to his shop, repaired the bearings and brought it back. The man is a SAINT!!!

    The 3 of us met up in the student lounge and had pizza delivered while I went on a beer run. The next day was a much needed day off for me. All 3 of us made our way to a car wash and cleaned our bikes up. We had dinner later that day at the Pump House on the Chena river. All of us then retired for the night and parted ways the next day. They were talking about doing the Dempster Hwy. I recanted my attempt and about the road closure. Me, I was going to travel the Denali Hwy and see what the cards had in store for me afterwards.

    The next day turned out to be AWESOME!!! It was the best weather I have had on the trip. Sunshine all the way south to Denali on the Parks highway. I was in heaven.
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    Denali Highway - Heavenly
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    The Alaska Range


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    The day did not go without issues, however. For starters, I stopped for gas and a sandwich near the junction of the Parks hwy and the Denali Hwy. In looking over my bike, I noticed that one of the panniers was barely hanging on. The unique BMW latching system had a missing bearing rivet(?). I was lucky it didn’t fall off on the main hwy. I had some wire with me, to wire it up, but I feared that it may not be strong enough. To the rescue was a gent in truck gassing up next to me. He pulled a spool of stainless steel wire out of his back seat. He cut off about 5 feet of it and gave it to me. To my dismay, my tool kit didn’t contain any pliers, just a pair of vice grips. So I began twisting the wire and it and I was doing a “piss-poor” job of it. It looked just horrible and I really couldn’t twist the wire in concise fashion needed to not only do the job, but make it look good. Just about then a fella on a Harley, from Texas, pulled up and chatted with me. It so happens that he is an aerospace mechanic for SouthWest airlines and had a proper wire twisting pliers in his kit. What luck. He promptly pulled them out and we ran some wire through the bearing hole and secured the latch . This meant, that I couldn’t take the box off without cutting the wire. His could be a problem later on for me and my tool box was nestled inside my pannier rack and the only way to open it was to take the pannier off. Fortunately, I needed no tools for the rest of the trip. His work looked top notch though, I wasn’t concerned about it coming loose for the rest of my trip.
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    Bring it on... More Alaska Range... AND SUNSHINE!!!!

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    Words... word can;t do justice to describe this land

    From there I hopped on the Denali Hw'. For the 1st time in a while on my trip, I had unfettered sunshine and unobstructed views of the Denali Range. It was superb. I pulled into the Sluice Box, which is the only place to get a good stiff drink on the entire Denali Hwy. The place was awesome. Dollar bills were plastered to the wall and ceiling. The barkeeps name was Lee, just like mine. He is a bush pilot and was a great source of information about the history of the area. In the bathroom, they had chalkboard walls and “chalk” to write graffiti. For the very first time in my life, I left graffiti on a Bathroom wall. I wrote “GrizzLee was here” or something of the sort. Took some video of it and the bar and my interview with Lee on my Gopro. Oh, they also serve delicious Ice Cream, so given the warm weather and the mood, I had my self a double scoop of Chocolate swirl and mocha.
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    I left the Sluice box riding at a casual pace stopping to enjoy the views and even stopping for an hour to take a nap on a knoll with the entire Denali Range in front of me with full sunshine overhead with a nice cool breeze to keep the bugs at bay. It was nice. I really couldn’t ask for more perfect weather.

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    Somewhere past the Maclaren Lodge I came upon a biker doing repair to his bike. The gentlemen turned out to be Yun, the guy I met at the Yukon crossing a couple of days earlier. He was the gent who had crashed his bike and bent the frame and destroyed his pannier. Here he was, his bike was repaired, frame straightened and pannier welded back. He was working on his footpeg to hold it on until the next town where he could get formal parts. We chatted a bit and decided to ride together.

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    Near the Maclaren River

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    I took a nap here under the clear skies of the Denali Hwy.

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    No need to dream... I was living it


    It wasn’t long from there when we ran into a couple from Delta stranded in their truck. Their front rear tire had a big gash in it and they couldn’t get the spare removed. Yun and I used a flashlight and fished the rod into the bumper looking for the winch connector to lower the tire. After nearly a ½ hour, we got the spare lowered for them. Afterwards we then took off and got dinner at the Tangle Lake Lodge. We were there awhile and soon the stranded couple whom we helped, pulled in and ate with us and then left. When we asked for our bill, we were told that the couple paid for or meals. That was awfully nice of them.

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    Yun and I spent the night at the Tangle Lakes Campground. It was beautiful out and the best part, we had sunshine well into the night and then awoke to more sunshine. Yeah baby. I was now getting into the groove of things.

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    Camp at Tangle Lakes


    To be continued…
    #79
  20. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    GrizzLee Stories From the North: Valdez and More


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    Tangle Lakes... Whooaa

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    Denali Hwy Beauty

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    So after a wonderful night at Tangle Lakes we headed over toward Paxson. Paxson is the official end, or start of the Denali Highway. Along the way we were treated to some of the best views Alaska has to offer. It was scrumptious. Once on the Richardson Highway, the weather really began to warm up. We passed through Gakona and Gulkana before arriving at Glennallen. The latter town serves as a hub as it sits at the junction of the Glennallen highway and the Richardson Highway. And a bit farther north is the Tok cutoff highway. It was here, in Glennallen that both, Yun and I refueled, got something to eat and planned our next move. I had thoughts of going to the Kennicot Mine out to McCarthy and such, while Yun had his sights set on going to Valdez. MY time up north was running short now and I only had time for one or the other. In the interest of having a riding companion for a while longer, it was decided to head to Valdez. I must say, the weather was spectacular and I won’t’ lie, the weather played a big part in my decision. Sunshine in Valdez can be a rare treat for these parts and seeing more glaciers and tasting the ocean air was enticing as well.
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    Parting shots of the Denali Hwy... It was hard to leave

    We soon came upon Mt Worthington and decided to hike up towards the Worthington Glacier. It was nice and refreshing. My legs enjoyed the hiking and my soul loved the views.

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    Mt Worthington glacier


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    Climbing up to the Glacier

    From there we headed over to Blueberry Pass and soaked up the incredible views of the deep fjord valley heading down toward Valdez. The Richardson Hwy snaked its way up and around the pass before dropping quickly into the valley below. It was hard to pay attention to the road as my eyes wandered all over the place trying to absorb the scenery passing by. We passed Horsetail Falls and Bridal Veil falls (geez, seems like there are a million falls named the same around the world), all so beautiful and within arms length off the hwy.
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    Yun, enjoying the beauty of the Richardson hwy and the waterfalls

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    Dream ride

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    We pulled into Valdez and did a quick tour of the town. We eventually parked the bikes on Harbor Drive and got some Thai food for dinner and enjoyed basking in the sunshine a bit, looking across the sound at the snow capped peaks. We then pulled out and went over to the other side of the arm to look for a good place to camp. Turns out, we decided not to camp over there because the Salmon were running.

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    Thousands and thousands of fish

    We stopped near the Solomon Gulch Fish Hatchery to witness thousands of salmon trying to spawn. There is a weir gate that prevents them from moving upstream to Solomon Lake. Sea Lions and Sea Gulls were feasting on the Salmon. The Sea Lions, seemed to have little respect regarding the salmon and killed them and would thrash them about and then finally let them go without eating them. Very strange behavior.

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    I swear I could walk across the sound on the backs of the fish

    As mentioned, not wanting to camp there due to bear activity, we proceeded to head over to the Valdez Glacier. There is a campground out that way but we thought that perhaps we could camp at the Valdez Glacial Lake. We arrived there and it was beautiful. A couple of folks were pulling out of the lake in their kayaks. We chatted a bit and took some photos. We were soon advised not to camp there in tents because of high bear activity there. Sooo we motored our way back to the “Valdez Glacier” Campground. As we pulled in, we saw a rather large black bear run across the road and into the campground. We quickly alerted folks that a Black bear had just entered the camp. May folks were grilling food over an open fire and it smelled delicious. I could see how a hungry bear could be swayed to invade a camp and attempt to swipe a delicious meal from some unsuspecting campers.
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    Valdez Glacier Lake

    In any event, we found a place to setup and grabbed a well deserved shower and settled in for the night.

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    Yun and myself posing with our steeds in the glacial wonderland

    The next day, I began my journey back home….
    #80