GS / ST Trippin', Trials - and an Evolution !

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by GAS GUY, Mar 28, 2014.

  1. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

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    That mud looks slick as snot. I remember driving tanks at Fort Knox in mud like that, power sliding 57.5 tons......
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  2. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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  3. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    Stopped back in at the "Detroit Epitaph" or London-based artist Anthony Gross's 1973 El Camino. He is also a filmmaker and an architect. There is a fire pit situated just in front of the vertical El Camino. It was even stocked with cut-up 2x4 wood scraps. Imagine sitting around a fire at night at this location. That would be surreal.

    I've also included below, his corresponding abstract story. Crazy interesting stuff.

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    The Last Road Trip on Earth

    01
    Prologue ⋅ Detroit 17th Sep 2050



    Slowly now, so many years later in this ruined earth of The Fossil Fuel, we plant electric sweetgrass on our land. A Native Indian crop, it staves off insects and now gently eats the toxic soils of past industry. Vibrating augmented in the breeze, it glows towards night fall forming small shiny nuggets of CO2 that we use to cook.

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    House


    I like picking them with little Ray and Franny, filling her geometric baskets before walking to the village green house. Nice to work a few hours there, repairing the coloured LEDs where needed, chatting to fellow artists.

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    Cell Ground

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    Bullet Proof


    We are so technologically advanced we are primitive again. It’s the simple life now, the end of mass-production. The end of mass-consumption. Only local legal. We had to lose 15 major coastal cities for the tide to change. Millions dead. We knew that would happen a 100 years before.

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    Incubator


    Thanks to The End of Engines (over 20 years ago now) and with self-driving load cars finally shared to every door, we live in connected villages: Ren Gen Villages with urban farming in the ruins of factories, roads replaced with roam space. The self-learning software that followed Big Data has eased everything. Our houses are heated by quantum servers.

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    Outside


    An age of Art that is not commodity. But The Scene respects, and we do barter and swap. There still is wealth creation, but shared. The End of The 1% was a Revolution. It meant re-thinking Capitalism and admitting it is social and always was. We generally fabricate what we need, with communal tools like the robot arms in the village workshop.

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    Flood


    Since polluting de-salination plants closed in 2040, balancing the water table is now our biggest daily work. We have the careful tasks of collecting water vapour from the fields of 3D printed branches, ionization, hydrogen fuel tanking, rain capturing, flood water control, filtering for drinking water, evaporation monitoring and safeguarding Bloody Run River, the underground creek that runs below us.

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    White sands
    02


    Detroit Sculpture ⋅ Rare Earth

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    Detroit Epitaph, 2016, mild steel, Eastern Market

    You made it. 18,000 miles a fun and dangerous ride. And at least 150,000 miles before us. The Car’s Dead. It’s back home now. It’s the memory of our road trip. that once-in-a-life-time-road-trip. My girlfriend pregnant, driving the sunset continually it was Terminator – though I was there – Mad Max, Thelma. I guess that makes me Louise, DeathRace2000, DuelChristineBullitt, DeathProofFearAndLoathing they merge. Us 3 driving V8 West, post-apocalypse into the burning sun.


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    Bead Museum

    Fell in love with Detroit a few years back. Kept coming back yearning for that big space. No interest in the suburbs it’s right here I feel it. The epicentre of the Capitalist Project that clearly failed in how it abandoned so many. Some basic infrastructure would be nice. Buses. Schools. Clean Water. Cheap Water. Food shops. Jobs. Cheap Land Tax. Not to be Foreclosed. Not to be poisoned. Not to be jacked by your own people, jacked by the State every day.


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    Detroit

    Jacked by Capitalism: it seems crystal clear as soon as one invents The Production Line, Man i.e. Labour is a problem. Human Labour is just too expensive. It’s the immediate beginning of the end. Ford could see the feedback loops. Pay workers more at first, they can afford stuff – the very Product they make. House them and they will need The Product to get to work to make The Product. Make The Product sexy, powerful, change it each year so you Want It. Bring workers from countries afar and fill them with The Dream. What a Dream, what a Time, the epicentre of the World, of industrial power, the birth of mass-consumption, style, technology, money. wow. Quite literally The Outcome of the Industrial Revolution.


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    Heildelberg

    A friend told me Ford would organise theatrical performances for the workers. A dance of different folkloric costumes all one by one climbing into a large cauldron, and out they came in tailcoats and top hats, a unified dance formation. Assimilate. Belong. Welcome.


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    Drone Trevorcutts Wrongway

    The El Camino is this Powerful Object of Desire. How fantastic it is. And Big Capitalist Thinking. The end of it. Boom and Bust. The passing of time. The incredible deco skyscrapers that have been abandoned till only now. The toxic soil. The amazing labour. The Death of Cities. Inventions from Babbage to Farraday to Tesla and Edison. To all the good technologies we lost through greed. The lives of the hard working, the lives of the not. Techno Underground, Hipster Detroit and a global Utopian Vision with Detroit in it’s veins. The Urban Farm, The Organic Market, Local Entrepreneurs, nothing to do with Stadium, nor Casino.


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    Train Station

    Slowly but surely the world divests of Fossil Fuels. Lobbyists scramble, investors take new bets Renewables are in. Oil $ so low, no point fracking. It’s Over. Energy is right there for free all this time and they knew it. Norway will ban the combustion engine from cities first.

    So here is an Epitaph. An electric storm gathers. Alfred Bridge is torn down. Eastern Market grows anew. Detroit grows again fraught of course. All that is burnt is now grass. The endless sound of freight trains braking engraves in me as I make my way each day here. A Chevy for Chief Pontiac in Bull’s Blood Red. A totem for Bloody Run River. A memory of Industry. A homage to V8 style and roadtrippin fantasy. A last road trip in the age of Fossil Fuels.


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    Dammed Wheel Club
    03


    The Car ⋅ A ’73 V8 El Camino SS

    Crazy to think New York was buzzing with 3000 electric cars in 1908 – what would the world be if Ford hadn’t crushed it all with his production-line-efficiency. Imagine how it would be now if it was the Detroit Electric that had been the success.


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    Dream

    I can’t believe the guy who invented leaded petrol to make Ford’s engine work: he also created CFC gases for Edison’s new electric fridge. The damage just one man can do. We didn’t know it at the time of course.


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    Sunset

    Far from a critique, the age of petrol engines was a fantastic ride. OK the government subsidizes gas prices but hey that meant we could ride a 1973 Chevy straight block 350 SS at 7mpg right across America in 2016 at $19 a full tank.


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    Headline

    A lovely ride. The V8 growling, pulling, purring loud, and the bench seat like a lux leather sofa high def sunset beamed into your eyes with gliding G force.


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    White Sands

    I knew that an engine like that was made the same for over 40 years, that we could break down anywhere – the next farm would probably have a spare.


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    Hoist

    OK I won’t buy an old car in Upstate New York again. Some place where it don’t rain. Incredible that we made it at all. 18,000 miles across The States. We didn’t know till after that it was spraying gas all over, that it could have burst into flames, that the chassis was so rusty it could have broke in half on a rough Puebloan road.


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    Nose

    Lost the entire exhaust. Threw the car at 70mph like a high jump pole digging in. A kind soul on an empty road for 300 miles helped prise it all off. With kitchen roll in our ears we got to Santa Fe. New muffler and some welded, then new carburettor, somehow the piston covers were punched through, chrome ones to replace. All new tires and smashed by the road to Marfa the guy had headlights for ’73 El Caminos, the last on his shelf. I was thinking at this rate when we arrive it will be a brand new car but no, a blow out at Houston bent the rear side out. Brakes failing, doors not closing, leaking in Houston it died. A lovely guy at Classic Cars of Houston refused to touch it but held it till I could ship it back Home, to it’s birth land, Detroit. An online friend of a friend and his motorcycle club seemed a perfect choice to turn it into The Epitaph. Stripped, lightweight, preserved, it’s home now, an eccentric beauty of a beast. A grandmother’s, surfer’s, Latino’s democratic psychedelic dream. A V8 superstar, the best car I ever drove. Thank you El Camino, you literally were The Way.


    04

    The Land ⋅ A Chevy for Chief Pontiac

    I’ve sat here for days. Marvelling at this incredible landscape. I’ve seen nothing like it. Detroit. The sheer scale of it all. A vast big sky. To my back an electricity station, corrugated metal walls high and tagged with generating pylons above. To my left: ‘wasteland’, though no such a thing really. Made up of slithers of land owners between Alfred and Division. Overgrown, marshy. To my right a vast industrial trench. Two beaten bridges dangerously span to Eastern Market across The Cut. Dequindre, what I call The Low Line.


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    The Land

    Along it’s length crumbing factory as far as you can see. Broken grids of concrete frame, tall metal water towers graffitied silhouetted, dangerous chimney stacks and parts of large black machinery, all of the ass end of Eastern Market unfolds. In the distance past a lonely church spire is the small cluster of Downtown skyscraper. Renaissance Centre glimmers it’s own sci-fi fantasy and empty 20’s deco scrapers mesmerise. Can I see The Guardian Building? My favourite skyscraper.


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    Sugar Factory 1940

    In front of me the slaughterhouse wall. Murals. In front of that, mosquitoes and a large concrete block.

    I went to the Library. I looked up all the old maps thinking it would have been a warehouse there 5 years ago. No it was 70. Time slides like no place in Detroit. A 1940’s sugar factory was here, and trains along The Cut. Now all is left is the concrete loading bay. It’s a plinth, a stage. An arena. A Sacrificial Alter.


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    Native Land

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    The Cut

    Looking at maps further back I discover it is the site of converging water ways. Detroit covered up the rivers as it expanded. Gridded over. No thought for sewerage or flood control so now the freeways spill over. The water is polluted. It’s short-sighted. It’s a scandal.


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    Alfred Bridge

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    Alfred Gone

    Not only that: this is the very land Chief Pontiac killed 2 dozen British soldiers. A righteous massacre – the river ran red with their blood. Seems a game of cricket was the time to do it. Strange to think of the blood of Indians, The French, The Brits and so many more fill this soil that is red with iron oxide, sugar and hexachrome. This land is possessed. It’s population abused. Homeless. Detroit is truly Haunted. Look at Rivera’s mural and the frieze of coal and iron ore. Crystals from the Earth in vast hands and below a machine throng of workers like no other, Consumed, Labour. Flesh Machine.


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    Diego Rivera
    05


    Future Ritual ⋅ No Energy Lost

    We lived underground for years. Outside was…. unsociable for a while.

    Below our land we found a vast network of salt tunnels last used for winter roads in the (19)40s. We dug and connected to the industrial steam network that stretched below downtown skyscrapers to form a vibrant under-earth city.

    A lot of buildings were barricaded already, so accessing them from underground worked very well.


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    Detroit Postcard

    We would emerge at the car, and venture out. The Fossil Fuel Revolution was an epic 20 years, people thought it was the end of the world and as a result behaved with some depravity. They just couldn’t see that everything was going to be OK. They had to let go of their Rare Earth products: they caused untold damage over there, just for yet another disposable smart device over here.

    Plastics were banned globally then. Vast Hemp fields covered most of America. Many lives were lost fighting the corporations trying to control all this. But after 60 years of renewables, of ethanol captured from manufacturing CO2, of self-sufficient urban farming, free water from condensation, and all the block chain currencies and free intranetworks, the old economy stalled. After the huge world movements of civil unrest, the governments capitulated.


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    Red-Stage

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    Sonic Field

    During this 5th Revolution, the air became fresh. The Tech was viable. Our shuttle-sharing economy meant our RenGen village was as close or remote as any other.


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    Comms Tower

    Our biggest success was using these salt caves under Detroit as a massive battery, channeling steam and focused sunlight to incredible temperatures for a molten flow of salt that swelled and sank day and night, breathing for us.


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    Social Arena

    We started to meet at The Car. It became a regular thing, a tentative social gathering that evolved into a music mash up festival atmosphere with impressive DIY sound systems attached to utility poles at a mile radius. People would venture out and all would be welcome. Guns were banned because honestly we just didn’t need them. We had a Living Wage, food, electronic music, drugs in moderation and a history of post-industrial tech to draw on.


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    Guardian Building

    My favorite work, which I can hear right now, is when we connected up the utility broadcast network to mics buried in the salt cave compound. We amplified the flow, cracking and breathing and made a crystal electric ambient score that soared over us like beautiful sea shore waves. We would cross-fade it to loud over the week before the monthly Gathering.


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    Girl and Sheep

    Baby Ray is grown up now, a respected electronic musician, her main focus is materials development. Beyond the nano was so much more space to discover.
  4. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    [​IMG]
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  5. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    Spaas Creek Road -

    A string of shots depicting some of the trail conditions along Spaas Creek Road while traversing the Kentucky Adventure Tour.


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  6. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    The Devil is a Liar -

    Another new mural in the Eastern Market of Detroit. Whether you believe in the devil as an absolute entity or just metaphorically, that statement get's your mind spinning and running rampant with examples. Some superficial and some that are lodged in the deepest crevices of your soul. Some even in your ego, if you dare to venture there.

    When I walked up on this mural (after recovering from the initial jolt of admiration - imparted by the striking art that flowed vivid colors) armed with a lifetime of programmed assumptions, I casually read this scene as the Devil seducing the young, beautiful, and naive woman.

    Then, when I showed the picture of this mural to a friend at work, he immediately asked me, "Which one is the Devil?" Interesting perspective.

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  7. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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  8. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    This morning Dr. Buzzard (Cuzzin' Will) took a ride down to the BMW dealer in Cleveland, Ohio. They had an attractively priced 2011 GSA with aluminum panniers and Ohlins suspension. It is sitting at 50,000 miles.

    He has been wanting a GSA for a long time. Even back when I had my 2007 GSA he was wanting one. He is a patient man.

    Before he left, I asked him to send me a picture of him and his new adventure machine - if he did in fact purchase it.

    Just a little while ago a text message blurted over my Galaxy, and sure enough, Will Smith and GSA standing proud.

    Only Black Man in Detroit with a GSA ... we assume. Now we have to see if Black Man can camp.

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  9. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

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    Congratulations Will !!! Looks like a nice bike
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  10. MileEater4ever

    MileEater4ever Been here awhile

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    Will, look what you've done! Congrats buddy.

    Sing to Him who rides across the heavens, his mighty voice thundering from the sky.
    Ps 68:33
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  11. drbuzzard

    drbuzzard Been here awhile

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    yes I've been wanting a GSA for a long time, let a few get away so I rode the Mighty ST 1300 over to aurora, oh. ( that's where BMW of Cleveland is, have to go back next weekend and pick it up. the ride there was uneventful the ride home was wet and windy 20181020_134308.jpg
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  12. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

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    Great looking bike and proud owner.Love the sweater too!!
  13. drbuzzard

    drbuzzard Been here awhile

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    it is my favorite sweater
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  14. drbuzzard

    drbuzzard Been here awhile

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    we will still have our adventures on the Mighty ST 1300's
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  15. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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  16. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    - Towards the end of Spaas Creek Road we had to ride up a sandstone ledge as we were leaving this wet and waterlogged section of the KAT and DBBB. The rock along this section brought slate or shale to mind - but I think it is technically sandstone. After dismounting the GSA, I looked over my choices before deciding to ride right up the middle where the water was trickling down. I'd been enjoying decent traction on this wet stone all morning and had no trouble tractoring up and out of Spaas Creek Road.

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  17. GAS GUY

    GAS GUY MILE EATER

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    Cleveland BMW -

    It was one of those dark, cold, dreary, and rainy - late October days. It's days like this that life can loose some of it's luster. Sometimes your the dog, and sometimes your the tree. On this day, we would be the tree; getting incessantly pissed on all day with low 40 degree temperatures and gloomy skies that never stopped producing rain.

    Nevertheless, we would stay optimistic and make the most out of the ride. We were riding from the Detroit area to Cleveland, Ohio. Specifically, the BMW Motorcycle Dealership in Aurora, Ohio. Will Smith was due to pick up his new-to-him 2011 GSA and ride it home. So, we would be there to escort him.

    Will was running a little late, as Kamikaze (his ride down) had stayed up till 3 in-the-morning the night before watching the Red Sox/Dodgers (extra innings) playoff game. This gave Scott and I time to lolly-gag and run a relaxed pace in the rain.

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    As we were exiting the highway, and sitting at the light, Scott offered up an interesting theory. He remarked, "Do you smell that burning rubber scent?" Naturally I did and replied as such. He continued, "I'm pretty sure it's rubber residue from worn tires on the road that the rain kicks up and onto the hot exhaust of the motorcycle."

    Now I would have never thought of that, but I suppose it's absolutely possible. That got me to thinking. Imagine all of the rubber tires that wear out on the roadways, fraction by fraction, and all of the corresponding rubber debris or dust floating around or being washed into the soil. Because we can't see it (in form) we take it for granted.

    While Dr. Buzzard filled out paperwork, we browsed around the dealership looking at the latest gear. Wouldn't be hard to drop 3K on riding gear these days. Best for the working man to wait for Black Friday and closeouts.

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    We also enjoyed the incredible hospitality this BMW dealership offered. They had chilli with all the fixins', pumpkin roll and Timbit donut pieces layed out on trays along with hot cider. Even Kuerig K-cups for fresh coffee.

    Down-to-earth owners, it seemed, also. A husband and wife. Probably in their late 50's or early 60's I'd guess, and I clearly detected at least a trace of nostalgic hippie character. Then his White Rabbit story totally gave it away. You know the owner of a BMW dealership is a real human being when he is wearing a Harley Davidson sweatshirt. The hell with toxic tribalism !

    With a final signature and a prepped bike, it was time to take a stroll into the shop and look over the beast before departure. Seem's they topped the massive 8.7 gallon tank - as well as our bellies.

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    They had just wired up a lead for Will so he could fire up his heated jacket liner and ward off the chill on the way home. The bike had a few noteworthy extras already installed by the previous owner. A few things I noticed: first and foremost was the heavy dose of gold, as in Ohlins shocks. The good ones too, with the piggyback reservoirs, complete with compression and rebound clickers, front and rear. Also the remote preload adjuster on the back - to quickly adjust the spring rate (and ride height) for varying payload. Also installed were Touratech (TT) fuel injector guards, TT potentiometer guard, TT wire mesh headlight guard, and a Mudsling in the rear. The Continental TKC-70's look to be fairly new. While the original owner must have removed his BMW Motorad GPS, he left the powered cradle. Just so happens that Will's Garmin 660 is the same series and snaps right in the mount and powers up. Voila. Things are coming together.

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    While inspecting the front Ohlins shock, I'd noticed the TT hard part guard on the front control arm.

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    Took a picture (for record) of the official starting mileage for Will's inception with the bike. Sometimes you forget little details like this in the heat of the moment. Another good reason to have friends around. Just broke in. Hope it turns out to be a good one.

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    Will rides it out of the shop and around front. Ready to roll.

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    Scott sporting (and still breaking in) his newish two-piece Roadcrafter. Him and Kenny rode up to Duluth in the spring, to the Aerostitch store - to carefully scrutinize the Roadcrafter vs. Darien vs. AD1 products and sizing.

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    On the road. Couzin Will finally owns a versatile GSA. My heart was filled with happiness for Will, as he has been wanting a GSA for a decade.

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    A rest area stop along Route 2. The Mighty ST1300 would eclipse 90,000 miles on this ride. All it has ever asked of me has been a $12 brake light switch.

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    Not a whole lot of color this year. Again. Last year was lackluster also. Still alot of green hanging around. Not sure if color is yet to come, or if the majority of the trees will simply drop their leaves. An occasional splash of color would present itself in spots - or sometimes a lone fiery tree popping out from all of the drab and fading green.

    What a day for his maiden voyage. Subsequent rides can only get better.

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    We had veered north and picked up the Lake Erie Coastal Trail. Night was setting in. The winds were picking up (from the north) and driving the rain. The lake looked ferocious as we rode alongside of it. White caps were smashing against the rocks as only a small strip of land lay between us and the fresh water spray.

    The auxiliary cells still carried a few gallons in reserve, but the Great Lakes Mile Eaters needed some fresh calories for fuel. So, while passing through Port Clinton, we pulled into Jolly Rogers Seafood House in search of - a mess of Lake Erie's finest Yellow Perch.


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    While initially a dinner seem's a little steep at $15 and some change, your attitude quickly dissipates when you feast your eyes on the platter that arrives in front of you. It could actually feed two. Good grub. Crispy waffle fries, biscuit, and cole slaw too.

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    After dinner, we slogged the remaining distance in the rain back north to the Detroit vicinity. As we passed by Detroit Metro Airport along I-275, a large low-flying passenger jet roared through the air directly above us as he was approaching the runway. The ST and the jet's similarities came to mind, as my own powerful headlights blazed a path into the dreary night.

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  18. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

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    Thanks for the pictures. I was wondering how the maiden voyage would be, Sorry Will's ride home on the new bike was a wet one.
    Send me a plate of perch, dang I miss that.....
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  19. drbuzzard

    drbuzzard Been here awhile

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    did my first farkle on the GSA today, a wolfman explorerlite tank bag 20181029_162317.jpg
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  20. Myll

    Myll Adventurer

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    Illinois
    I like my wolfman lite. Easy to fuel up releasing the 2 straps depending which side you fill up. Non intrusive standing up, and holds all the essentials needed for quick access.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
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