Ham Radio - Yaesu FTM-10R Install in Gen2 Yamaha Super Tenere

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by GSequoia, Nov 8, 2019.

  1. GSequoia

    GSequoia I know a few things about radios... Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,505
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Then on to laying out my cable gland holes.

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    I had to trim some of the structure away to fit the nuts behind the glands. To do so I used a hot knife approach. Anytime you can play with fire is a good time.

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    Glands in place. The top center item you see is an external speaker connector so I can listen to USFS fire radio to see if I gotta get out of Dodge (an apt subject giving the California wildfires going on right now).

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    I mounted the box to the plate with M8 buttonhead bolts with rubber washers in between the bracket and case as well as in between the case and washer before the nuts (inside the case). I also made four holes for my radio to box mounts and enlarged them so they only bolt to the box. Again I used rubber washers in between all hardware and box.

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    Since I can't be completely sure of water tightness I put some desiccant packs in the case before dropping the radio in. These change color when wet (the one on the right is wet, you can see the darker beads) indicating if I have a problem.

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    Now to the wiring part of the project. Since I was using cable glands I had to cut off all connectors, pass the cables through, then put them back on. Luckily I run an IT Department so have tools on hand to make it easier. The face plate uses seven conductors in an RJ45 jack. I use pass-through RJ45 connectors so I can easily make sure that the wires are in the correct order and correct bores leaving the eighth empty.

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    I had to sever my Sena SR10 cable and re-create it, as well.

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    Radio in place with a copule extra desiccant packs for good measure. It's a tight fit but works.

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    Radio in place and Givi case on for fitment test. Works just fine.

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    The plate without the Givi case hiding it.

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    Cable gland connections and speaker port.

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    The wires are routed up to the subframe and lashed in place. The connection point for power is under my seat so that as well as the head unit cable and speaker/mic cable (currently still using a Sena SR-10 go there, too.

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    All done.

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    Now I can run the radio and a rear seat and the radio will never be in my way. For day-to-day riding I'll likely still remove it. All will come apart easily, the only thing that's a bit of a PITA is routing the head unit cable through under the tank and out through the dashboard.
    #21
    NSFW and Gone Troppo like this.