Harbor Freight Trailer

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by Thinc2, Mar 5, 2006.

  1. dad2bike

    dad2bike Retired! Cranky Old Fart Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    16,787
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Also 62645
    At the bottom of the page
    garandman likes this.
  2. dad2bike

    dad2bike Retired! Cranky Old Fart Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    16,787
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Here's shot of the coupon email I got.

    Screenshot_20180807-081319_Email.jpg
  3. dad2bike

    dad2bike Retired! Cranky Old Fart Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    16,787
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Finally the weather got cool enough to paint up the wood for the trailer.
    I was going to do 2 coats. But this Behr stuff is so thick. I used the entire gallon for a single coat.
    20180824_131758.jpg
    20180824_132142.jpg
  4. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,891
    Location:
    Dorchester, MA / Sunapee, NH
    We used th3 same stuff only black - to help melt snow! Where you live a light color seems more appropriate.
    dad2bike likes this.
  5. Zq8 blazer

    Zq8 blazer n00b

    Joined:
    May 29, 2017
    Oddometer:
    9
    Does anyone know where I can get the stake pockets for these trailers? Or does anyone have any they didn’t use and want to sell?
  6. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,917
    Location:
    Boysee
  7. FairweatherJohn

    FairweatherJohn FairweatherJohn Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Central Calif
    Two 4x4 sheets of plywood or one 4 x 8 ft piece for deck?

    Bought a used superduty trailer that needs some restoration (needs new wood deck and wiring). I do not need to use the folding feature.

    Now wondering if it is required to cut a 4 x 8 ft plywood sheet in half, or can I bolt on one big 4 x 8 sheet - which should make the rig solid. Why cut the sheet into two pieces?
  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    91,396
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    If you do not want to fold it, a single sheet makes it stiffer.
    SmittyBlackstone and dad2bike like this.
  9. FairweatherJohn

    FairweatherJohn FairweatherJohn Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    70
    Location:
    Central Calif
    Thanks JimVon Baden.

    It seems like not splitting the plywood sheeting into two pieces would be OK. But I did want to see what the collective of HF trailer fans has to say- before I mucked the restoration up.

    I will proceed to bolt down a full sheet, uncut.

    Zoom-Zoom!
    SmittyBlackstone and JimVonBaden like this.
  10. snowmark

    snowmark Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    388
    Location:
    Coal Creek Canyon Colorado/Longmont/Youngstown,OH
    I have the HF 3x4 ft steel, 8 inch tires with a rail bolted to it, balanced for almost no tongue weight and it hauls a trail bike behind my Solara no problem, doubt it weighs 100lbs...although many states have a mandatory 55mph limit on trailers I have often found myself hitting 70....going to upgrade to a 5x8 aluminum from Northern Tool so I can carry two bikes..... use a class II hitch, 1 7/8 ball

    Attached Files:

  11. LewisNClark

    LewisNClark Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,736
    Location:
    North GA and Atlanta
    Just picked up a new model/edition of the 4x8 (1096#) Harbor Freight trailer on sale with a coupon for $269 (Snellville, GA). Came with 12" tires and manual suggests included new bearing update, and this new version has 1 7/8 hitch ball instead of 2" that manual says it had. Finished assembly in 5 hrs including plywood.....tested the plywood deck with HD Behr textured paint and Rustoleum Black Oil based paint...and the Rustoleum oil base definitely holds up better at repelling water than Behr paint.

    Don't remember my other trailer having a lube joint but this new(er) HF has a lube joint (hidden on the back of the wheel assembly) so if someone buys this trailer, breakdown and buy a simple grease gun and a few tubes of grease to take care of the bearing issue. But fill the hub cap up during initial assembly of wheel. It looks like the lubricant is left out on purpose so you have it easier to assemble wheel/axel parts …so lube bearing area and fill up the hub cap with grease as a final step.

    I also relocated the brake light since my previous trailers always got the brake light busted during first use. Looking for a bracket (like a cheap door pull or angle iron) to cover/protect the side marker lights, since they always get taken out.

    Over all, the Harbor Freight trailer seems solid as a rock. I don't need the folding feature. If you don't need the folding feature I'd recommend 4x8 uncut plywood. Frame is much stiffer with uncut plywood sheet. At 4' wide I would not attempt to haul 2 heavy bikes side by side.

    Scratching my head on how this trailer can be so cheap. Both tires and wheels alone are $110, brake lights & wiring $25 at Wallyworld or anywhere.
    SmittyBlackstone and dad2bike like this.
  12. dad2bike

    dad2bike Retired! Cranky Old Fart Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    16,787
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    My little trailer had the 1-7/8 hitch as well. I bought a 2" from harbor freight to replace it.
  13. West Coast Joe

    West Coast Joe Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Oddometer:
    46
    Location:
    California
    I actually own three of these trailers. I bought them all used.

    The first is the 4 X 8 foldable, I've owned for years. The nice thing is that the former owner put an aluminum diamond plate deck on it. I've got a short wooden (pressure treated and painted) headache rack in the front and tailgate on the back, It's got tie downs about every two feet an all of the edges. Paid $300.

    The second one is the smaller version I bought about six months ago. The previous owner installed a wooden box on it with a lockable door on the back. the box is about 4 1/2 feet long, 4 feet wide and 4 feet tall. Basically it's an enclosed trailer. I ended up reinforcing the floor and tightening everything up. Paid $300.

    The third I got with the purchase of my house. It's the fold up version, but slightly wider than the 4 X 8. It's got a wooden deck and stakebed sides. I won't take it out, until I've had a chance to inspect the bearings.

    All were fully registered with license plates when purchased.

    They all have the 8 inch wheels, which is fine with me. I tow them with the same car, so I keep the spare tire and my trailer tools in the back. One of the trailers, does have the 6 ply tires, which are rated for more weight and faster speed. I also like the low deck height for loading.

    I tow them with a unibody car, so legally I can't gross over 1000 lbs. Also I don't drive fast anymore either, especially when towing.

    I also make sure to put some grease on the hitch ball, before hooking up. This way it doesn't bind and hopefully will last longer.

    The bearings are metric, but I've heard the spindles are very close to 1 inch and people have been known to swap out the metric hubs and bearings with domestic ones. I did find the bearings at Pep Boys once, but they weren't cheap. Since then I've bought spares online. Also I've been told the bearings do not come packed from the factory, but are greased for shipping to prevent rust. In other words, you need to pack your bearings on your new trailer before running it.

    Different types brands etc of grease can counteract each other. This is why you need to completely 100% clean the old grease out if you are repacking bearings. The soap in the grease may wash out the soap in the new grease if they aren't exactly the same.

    Bearing buddies are nice if you put your wheels in the water (towing a boat). Otherwise, I've read that all the grease in the hubs actually makes the bearings run hotter, because there is nowhere for the heat to go. A grease fitting is no substitute for cleaning and repacking bearings.

    I really dig my old trailers and the fact that they are so simple to use and cheap to buy.

    I'm no expert, so please keep that in mind when reading my suggestions.

    Be safe everyone..
    Tall Man and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  14. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,994
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    I've been thinking about widening the bed on my trailer (not the axle) so I can more easily fit two bikes.

    A while ago I stumbled on a post, I thought it was here but maybe on a different site, where someone welded a small rectangle onto each side of the trailer in front of the wheel (they used right angle steel) and then put a small piece of plywood over it. Does this ring a bell with anyone? If so, can you point me to the post?

    Broke one of the cheap casters off. What's a good heavy duty replacement? I'll probably need to replace all 4. I stumbled onto this (http://manuals.harborfreight.com/manuals/87000-87999/87616.pdf) not sure what it's referring to.

    Thanks
  15. lkraus

    lkraus Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,521
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    My plastic casters lasted 11 years before one broke, about 11 years longer than I expected. I replaced them with HF 90997 3" steel casters. The larger diameter works better on cracked or rough surfaces.
  16. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,994
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Hmmn, mine were metal though cheap. Thanks for the link.
  17. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,891
    Location:
    Dorchester, MA / Sunapee, NH
    Here’s what we did.
    [​IMG]
    Newner likes this.
  18. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,994
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Yeah. I've seen similar. Some will just bolt a 2x4" down onto the front of the bed.

    I was just wanting to find the picture I was thinking of. I'll have to do a deep google session tomorrow :)
    The advantage of what you've done is that it's removable and not always in the way. The advantage of what I was talking about was that because it actually widened the bed in front of the wheels (basically widened to the width of the wheels) it created a platform you could stand on to help load.
  19. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    19,320
    Location:
    Delaware Ohio
    This looked really interesting to me for a couple hundred bucks. My main use would be carrying yard waste to the local organic farm down the road and hauling a single bike several times a year a hundred miles away to ride where riding is good. I just see it as a good light weight for my 300 lb bike and for the yard work.

    You have found no problems with the build? The metal is heavy enough, maybe toss the hardware and buy higher quality? You say 8" tires, you mean 8" wide and wider rims, but still 12" diameter?
  20. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,891
    Location:
    Dorchester, MA / Sunapee, NH
    Using lumber to tie down $10-20,000 of motorcycles strikes me as a really bad idea.

    Had no problems but the HF trailer is relatively high and I was worried about stability. Since upgraded to a wider Aluma with torsion spring axles so load height is lower and track is wider.

    As others here suggested, mock up your bike positions in the driveway before installing chocks.

    Also as others here suggested, Northern Tool 5’ wide aluminum kit is a popular choice and also gives you a wider track. Often on sale with free shipping.

    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200660344_200660344