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Have you ever seen Wild Hogs? 750 miles of Hoggin'

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by Gnarcosis, Mar 7, 2020.

  1. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
    Location:
    Flagstaff, AZ
    A few years back, a coworker had just broken up with his girlfriend. In an effort to clear his mind, and silence mine, I suggested we engage in some good old fashioned day drinking. Sitting at the local tourist bar amongst the other enthusiasts, he opened up a dating app and began filling out the personality survey. Always wanting to be on the front lines of the dating game, I quickly downloaded the same app and began to complete my profile.

    "Am I spontaneous?.. Heck no," I thought aloud.

    "What about the time you made me drive to Havasu with you after work so you could buy Jet-skis that you randomly decided you just NEEDED to have?"

    "Yeah, but I've always wanted Jet-skis, and plus, we had a hotel room you could smoke in, so that made it a worthwhile trip."

    "What about the time you made us pool all of our tips from the week and buy a whole roll of scratch-off lotto tickets? Or when you drove to Tucson to pick up that free car from Craigslist, then traded it for that piece of crap motorcycle that you left on the side of the road? That was spontaneous. I feel like you're always doing something like that on a whim, and never really giving it a whole lot of thought," He said.

    I guess I would have called that impulsive, but he was right. "Let's go now, we'll figure it out on the way" type of adventures have always been a staple in my life. So when I found myself in Albuquerque with a few days off, I knew I would get up to something.
    IMG_3982.jpeg
    I also spontaneously "donated" this car to a nice tow man in Barstow, in exchange for pulling it off the highway after a VERY long day of MacGuyvering.

    I work on the road, and am hardly ever home, nor am I ever close to home. The current project I am on, however, has me in Albuquerque, a quick 4.5 hours from home in Arizona. With some down time, I figured it would be fun to run home and check the mail, feed the fish, and maybe sleep in my own bed for the night. I didn't want to take my work truck, as I'd been in the thing for 15+ hours a day for the last few weeks. I was trying to find a way to rent a decent car or motorcycle, when I came across a special at the Eagle Rider Harley rental place in town. $107 out the door for a 24 hour rental of an "Iron 1200." Welp, that's what were doing, I thought, as I immediately booked the thing.

    It was just shy of 2:00PM, and I was supposed to pick up my Steel Horse at 3:00. So I threw on my trusty Double H work boots, and ran out the door. On the way down the highway I thought about what I might need. I had rented a helmet, but gloves I hadn't thought of. I looked down in my passenger seat at the well used, leather Mechanix gloves that I wear at work, but before I could convince myself they'd be good enough, I remembered I would be driving right past a Cycle Gear.


    IMG_4671.jpeg

    IMG_4672.jpeg
    I mean come on. What else would you wear on a Harley​

    I've been wanting some warmer gloves anyway, as my GP Pro's are many things, but warm isn't one of them. I ran into cycle gear and decided to give these Corozal Drystar's a try. Even though I wish they had more of a gauntlet on them, they felt pretty insulated, but not so much so that I couldn't feel the controls.

    IMG_4674.jpeg IMG_4673.jpeg

    I hopped back into the truck and excitedly drove down to Eagle Rider, where I spied the beast out front waiting for me. I've ragged on Harleys as long as I can remember, but had to admit that this one did look pretty darn sexy. But more on that later.
    60514028684__A1A92CCF-8691-4B3D-8B8F-AD88DD3FEF16.jpeg
    That paint scheme is seriously attractive.
    I signed the paperwork, and opted for the 70 dollar full coverage no deductible roadside assistance mega vip package. I usually decline that stuff, and I think my credit card provides insurance on rentals anyway, but I of course did zero research on the matter, so figured 70 dollars was fair enough to not have to worry about the bike.

    The rental dude showed me how to start the bike, and explained how the controls worked. It was an interesting presentation, useful information, sure, but do you really want to rent a bike out to a guy who needs you to explain how to ride it? Maybe it was just because I didn't have a leather vest, and or Harley Davidson t-shirt on.

    Before I set off, he asked the one question that would ring in my head for the next 24 hours, "Hey, have you seen the movie Wild Hogs?"


    To be continued..
    #1
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  2. keithg

    keithg Been here awhile

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    PRESCOTT VALLEY AZ
    Keep going............
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  3. ADK

    ADK eponymous

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    That's what she said.
    #3
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  4. MattLikeyBikey

    MattLikeyBikey Been here awhile

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    So Cal
    You had me at wild hogs.
    #4
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  5. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    Edmonton, Alberta
    I'm in given a desert setting and a Sportster.
    #5
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  6. scfrank

    scfrank Old farts riding club. Supporter

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    Oct 27, 2005
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    Cool. Can't wait for the Peter Fonda Cameo.
    #6
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  7. Otroo

    Otroo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
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    In for the journey
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  8. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
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    Flagstaff, AZ
    Not wanting to crash the bike immediately, I decided to take a few laps around the big parking lot. The bike really didn't feel heavy, and while the clutch engagement seemed to be at the absolute end of the lever's range of motion, it was smooth and easy to actuate. I cracked the throttle and mashed on the brakes, those felt pretty decent as well. I gave it a few more panic stops until I locked up the rear, and decided I was properly acquainted with the beast.

    I pulled out of the dealership/ rental place, and it was just a block away from the on-ramp. I caught the green arrow and gave 'er the business getting on the highway. The power delivery was smooth and linear, but it wasn't terribly exciting. I couldn't hear the 1200 V-Twin as much as I could feel it. The initial exhaust note sort of merged with the vibration underneath me, and the two became one. It's a weird thing I don't know if I can describe, but the bike felt like it sounded, and sounded like it felt.

    My real experience with V-Twins comes from my Hyper. Granted, the full Termignoni system allows for some improved acoustics, and the Harley was on stock exhaust, but I was still expecting this Harley to really roar. Count me disappointed in that department.

    15792948-D207-4AD7-A693-032E9EEC750D.jpeg

    By "Improved Acoustics" I of course mean, ear splitting, thunder clapping, hyena wailing, pure, uncut, Italian.. Intercourse. (I'm not sure how strict they are about that whole "Be appropriate" rule in this forum.. But I've had a solid 8/10 moaning my name, and it didn't turn me on half as much as cold starting this Ducati does.)


    Anyway, back to that Harley.. Pulling on to the highway was underwhelming. It had plenty of power, but it just didn't seem to put it down in any sort of exciting way. The hotel I have been living in for the last few months was just a few miles down the 40, so I figured I should stop and grab some supplies before I hit the road. It also dawned on me that I had neglected to take my medication the night before.. that might explain why I was smashing down the highway on a rented Harley with no real plan.

    I pulled the bike under the front awning of the Holiday Inn Express, and when I looked down to find the kick stand, I saw this laying on the ground. Now, I still didn't have a leather vest, but honestly I may not need one as long as I kept this bad boy on me. What a stroke of luck.

    IMG_4681.jpeg
    True story.. I had a coworker who rode a Dyna, and fully embraced the leather vest lifestyle. He ended up trading his CBR1000RR for like $4500 of tattoo work, and he got DILLIGAF tattooed from elbow to wrist on his forearm. I wish I was making that up.

    I ran up to my room and tried to think of what I might need. I wasn't crazy on squidding it down I-40 for 400 miles in jeans and a hoodie, so I ditched the jeans for some FR Carhartt work pants. Squidding it for 400 miles in FR pants and a hoodie, now that I am ok with. In a rare stroke of genius, I threw two Under Armor base layers in my backpack, grabbed my wireless earbuds, and ran back out the door. Before I made it back down to the ground floor, I thought seriously about going back to the room for a phone charger and power bank, but decided I preferred to live dangerously, and kept on my way.

    Dilligaf patch safely in my pocket, I piloted the beast across the street to top it off with gas. These Harleys are neat because there is no lock on the fuel cap, so you can just unscrew it without needing the key. As such, I left the bike running. I ordered up some 91 octane premium fuel, and gave the nozzle a firm squeeze, into what was quite obviously a full tank. As the fuel erupted out and all over me, I thought, "heck yeah these FR pants are about to pay off big time!" Luckily, there was no fire, or if there was, it was minor enough to not be noticed. I flipped down my fighter pilot visor and roared out of the gas station, leaving a trail of fuel and shame in my wake.

    IMG_4646.jpeg IMG_4647.jpeg IMG_4648.jpeg
    I've never used one of these helmets before. And when I was a kid, I used to watch Top Gun every single night. So I hope you can understand my excitement here.​

    As I settled in on the first leg of my journey, I decided to take a minute to try to think what I was actually doing, how I could best accomplish it, and what my potential obstacles would be. I think these are things that are best hashed out prior to renting the bike and hitting the road, but eh, better late than never.

    To be continued..
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  9. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
    Location:
    Flagstaff, AZ
    I figured Grants, NM would be a good waypoint. I have also spent many months in that godforsaken town, and knew there was a gas station right off the highway. It was about an hour away, so I settled in and started thinking about what sort of witty things I could say in my future ride report. (As you can see, I didn't come up with much.) My initial observations on the bike were mixed. It had no problem what so ever cruising along at 75ish, even though every time I looked down at the speedometer it seemed to be at or around 85. That must be the sweet spot. I also spent a substantial amount of time trying to clip that chest clip on my backpack, but with the new gloves, it was not happening, and decided in the interest of safety, I'd better leave it alone.

    The pegs were sort of strange as well. I believe they call them "Mid Controls." But they were essentially right under my knees, like you'd find on an upright bike. I'm used to rear sets on sport bikes, but also have loads of time on dirt bikes, supermotos, and various upright adventure type bikes. On every other bike I've ridden, you can have your feet planted firmly on the pegs, and while you can easily access the controls, they aren't in your way. This bike was different. I couldn't plant my right foot on the peg without inadvertently putting pressure on the massive brake pedal. Same goes for the left foot and the shifter. I tried to slide my toes between the peg and the shifter, as you would on a sport bike, but it just wasn't a position I felt comfortable in. I ended up sliding my feet back, and just keeping the ball of my foot on the peg. I've definitely ridden like this before, and maybe its just part of riding a cruiser, but I didn't really feel like my feet were planted. And again, that's fine, but when you hit a little bump in the road and your butt comes off the seat, its nice if you can use your feet for some support. Long story short, I think some forward controls or highway pegs would go a long way. This bike did have crash bars on the front, and one could sort of rest their boot on the bars, but I was envisioning my boot melting on the exhaust, and or my foot making contact with the wheel somehow, so I avoided that, making a mental note to take a look at the clearance next time I stopped.

    The other fun feature I discovered I nick-named the "Rattlesnake Shake." As the Aerosmith version of the song has been stuck in my head for the last 13 years or so, it seemed a fitting title. My best guess is that it is due to the large windscreen on the front of the bike, but I couldn't take it off to test the theory. Essentially, any time there was a crosswind, the bars would develop a nice little shake back and forth. A Rattlesnake Shake, if you will. The first time I felt it, I tensed on the bars, which immediately intensified it. So I loosened my grip and rolled off the throttle, and it went away. This happened another 30 or 40 thousand times over the next 24 hours, and it quit bugging me after too long, but definitely a unique and fun feature when you're squidding' down the highway with nothing to keep you from cheese-grater-ing yourself along the asphalt should you take a spill. (And/or jerk away them blues.)

    tumblr_p99i7dHxsg1tsxh9ko1_500.jpg
    "This next song is about self abuse. Its called... Rattlesnake Shake."

    Other than not being able to properly place my feet on the pegs, the Rattlesnake Shake, and the occasional bump out of the seat, it really wasn't a bad ride. The seat I found to be insanely comfortable. The bars were at a great position, where I didn't feel any stress on my shoulders or wrists. And when that windscreen wasn't acting like a sail, it did a good job of keeping the air pretty calm, and there wasn't a whole lot of buffeting or any wind related drama. I couldn't help but think of how sweet the bike would be with a steering damper though..

    As I got closer to Grants, I had no fuel light on, but figured I better still stop and get some. I also knew there was a Walmart in Grants, and thought about stopping and grabbing a jacket in case it got cold, but talked myself out of that. IMG_4604.jpeg
    IMG_4606.jpeg IMG_4605.jpeg

    I topped back off with gas, not spilling any this time. 45MPG was not too shabby, and you can't beat a fill up for less than 5 dollars.

    At this point I seriously considered just turning around back to Albuquerque. It was just after 5, and I knew I had another 4 hours or so until I made it home. I started doubting myself, worrying about the cold, worrying about it being dark, hell, I didn't even have any gear on. And for what, to feed my fish?

    That self doubt has bullied me and held me back my whole life. At least now I can recognize it. I've done this drive a million times in a truck, it's not going to be a whole lot different on a bike. I said I was going to ride this thing home, we're riding it home. And that's that.

    IMG_4607.jpeg
    What do we say to the self doubt monster? "Eff you, you're not my real dad," and then slam a Shred Bull.



    To be continued.
    #9
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  10. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
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    Flagstaff, AZ
    Also, to whom it may concern.. Trying to center these captions under the photos is quite possibly the most difficult thing I have ever attempted. So we're gonna call good enough good enough, and just leave them as they are.
    #10
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  11. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
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    Flagstaff, AZ
    Alright gotta bear with me here, as work is actually making me work for my pay this week. When we left off, I was ignoring my reservations about continuing on home.

    After fueling up, I did a quick google search to see if there was a more fun way to get home. There wasn't anything that wouldn't take me way out of the way, so I decided to just hop back on the 40 and keep cruising. At this point I was still apprehensive, and found myself staring at the odometer, doing mental math constantly to figure out how much longer I would be on the road, how long it would take me to get back to Albuquerque, etc.

    Music often allows me to zone out, and I can cross states at a time without even realizing. (A valuable thing when driving obnoxious distances is a daily fact of life for you!) As such, I tried to hone in on the music and relax a little, but this section of I40 is a minefield of pot holes, shoddy asphalt patches, and a variety of other treats that will launch you out of the saddle. Combined with the wind and Rattlesnakin', I wasn't really having a whole lot of fun. It's amazing how much an anxious, negative attitude can ruin a mood.

    Before too long, I came upon the sign for the Continental Divide. I've driven past it a million times, but never stopped, so I figured I'd hop off and get a sweet photo.

    IMG_4608.jpeg
    I'd figured there would be a sign or plaque or something. There wasn't. So I took this photo on the On-Ramp.

    I took a second to get my music situation sorted out, deleting a bunch of songs from my "Up Next" that I didn't feel suited my journey. I hopped back on the 40, dodging potholes, staring into the sun, and trying to find a good place to put my feet. As the sun continued down, the wind continued to blow, and every so often one of the gusts would be just a little bit colder than the ones before.

    As I came up on Gallup, NM, I again thought about stopping at the Walmart and grabbing a Jacket, but again decided I wouldn't need one. So I continued on through, not even stopping for fuel.

    Just outside of Gallup is a sign that shows the distance to Holbrook, Winslow, and Flagstaff. And a quick bit of mental math will let you know that you're now closer to Flagstaff than you are to Albuquerque. AHA! Now my anxious mind can relax. Home is closer than turning back to Albuquerque, so of course we'll continue on home. It's the only choice that makes sense. I didn't have to keep convincing myself, I believed it now.

    The road seemed to smooth out, the sun dropped below the horizon, the breeze was brisk but not cold. I switched the digital display on the bike so it wouldn't show the odometer, and I settled in on the bike, anxiety alleviated. Did I mention how comfortable that seat was, it seriously was a lovely place to sit. I came upon the AZ/NM border, and slowed down to see if I could get a photo of the Welcome to Arizona sign, but saw it was pretty far off the highway, and there was no way to get to it. (Probably to prevent stupid motorcyclists from stopping on the side of the highway and taking pictures.)

    "Life's Been Good," blaring through my earbuds, I got lost in a train of nostalgic thought. I used to listen to that song, the live version, when running the weekly mile in high school. Coming in around 8 minutes, it was the perfect gauge to keep pace just right. I glanced back down at the speedo, and saw the fuel light was on. Just like the guy from Smash Mouth said, "I said yep, what a concept, I could use a little fuel myself..."

    IMG_4610.jpeg
    Thats what that looks like, if you were wondering. ​

    I switched back to the trip, and saw it was 98 point something miles. I thought back to my past self, the one from like 40 minutes ago who figured it would be a good idea to pass through Gallup without getting fuel, and then pass all those stations by the state line without getting fuel, and wondered why he was the way he was. I truly didn't know how far this bike would go with the fuel light on, but the only thing I could do was keep going, so at least I didn't have to make any decisions.

    15 or so miles down the road I saw a Mobil station right off the side of the highway. Situated properly in the center of Nowhere, I was relieved to find fuel, but more so excited to throw those two Under Armor base layers on! I pulled off and parked the bike behind a school bus, squirted 2 or so gallons into the bike, (only spilling a scosche) and ran inside to grab some sustenance and change.

    The gas station was full of middle school aged cheer leaders, and a few really exhausted looking men, who were hopefully parents of the kids, and not just some weird guys hanging out at this gas station in the middle of no where. Speaking of weird guys at gas stations in the middle of nowhere, the mens bathroom was nothing more than a repurposed broom closet, and there was no where to set anything down. Needless to say, trying to take my hoodie and t-shirt off, while holding my helmet and backpack, and grab two shirts from the backpack, put them on, put the other shirts on, put the hoodie on, and not look like some dude just getting naked in the bathroom while the store was full of prepubescent girls, was a bit of a task, but I think I managed to pull it off. I grabbed some fuel for myself, and hopped back on the highway.
    IMG_4612.jpeg
    Hey man, ever think that all that caffeine might have anything to do with all that anxiety? Nah.. Doubt it.

    To be continued.
    #11
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  12. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
    Location:
    Flagstaff, AZ
    I once had an instructor who said something to the effect of, "if I ever need something embellished a bunch, and just over explained with a vivid amount of detail that is totally overkill, I'll ask you to tell the story." Well, Mr. Greene, here we are, hours of writing and thousands of words later, and we've covered like 2 hours of riding. My services are still available, and my rates are super reasonable!

    When I walked out of that gas station after changing in the closet of a bathroom, the first thing I noticed was that it was like proper dark now, and that it was cold. I don't mind the dark what so ever, in fact I prefer it for most drives, as there is less traffic, less stupid people etc. But the dark means the cold, and the fact that it was already kind of cold, meant that it was only going to get colder. But, I just needed to get some body heat brewing, and those two base layers would trap it in, and I'd be nice and toasty!

    And it actually worked out pretty good! The next hour flew by. The breeze had a chill to it, but I wasn't cold. The bike was cruising along, there was hardly anyone on the road, and before I knew it, I was just outside Holbrook. Holbrook is 30 ish miles east of Winslow, and I always stop at one or the other, as they each have a gas station that I am a big fan of. I checked the odometer, and figured it wouldn't be an issue to push it to Winslow, so I kept on.

    IMG_4615.jpeg
    Too close for missiles, switchin' to guns!

    Winslow is about an hour from home, so based on the fact that I'd almost made Winslow, I reckoned that I'd almost made home, so my once anxious mind was totally at ease. I was riding a gosh darned Harley Davidson through the desert at night, I smiled in my Top Gun helmet. I had to admit that it was pretty cool, and I really was having a ball.

    I pulled in to my gas station in Winslow, fueled up, and checked my phone. My buddy had asked what I was doing, millennial speak for "I'm bored, please entertain me." I sent him a quick shot of the bike at the gas pump. Knowing how I feel about Harleys, he challenged me, saying, "You didn't buy that!"

    IMG_4614.jpeg

    IMG_4617.jpeg

    He was right, I didn't buy it. So rather than address his question, I sent him this picture and simply replied, "Have you ever seen Wild Hogs?"


    To be continued. Almost there folks I swear.
    #12
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  13. neppi

    neppi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2017
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    646
    Location:
    Tauranga, New Zealand
    Ü
    #13
  14. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
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    Flagstaff, AZ
    I left the Maverik in Winslow, it was cold at this point, but I was so close to home it didn’t matter.... at first. Before too long I caught myself singing my “it’s too cold” song. It’s an original tune that came to me many years ago while riding a CB450 through a sleet/ ice storm. The words are as follows

    Oh my god it’s so fucking cold,

    I’m going to die because it’s so fucking cold,

    Hoooly shit it’s so fucking cold,

    I’m going to die because it’s so fucking cold.”


    You can repeat as many times as needed, maybe mix up the order of the verses. I probably have hundreds of hours of GoPro footage of me screaming this into my helmet, but luckily for you guys I’m not going to go looking for it.

    45D2EFFD-33C9-41AD-9D09-8EAF2AAF979C.png
    Ah.. that’s why it was so cold.
    My hands went from cold, to frozen, to numb, to that really unpleasant type of ache that happens when the numbness wears of. Those new gloves are great, but under 40, they really seem to quit working. I do have heated grips on my AT, but I’ve never had the pleasure of using them in the cold. They probably would have kicked ass at this point though!

    I drove past the Casino I worked at for like 2 weeks back in college, and a few frigid minutes later, I was getting off the highway, taking the backroads back to my house. It was pitch black, my hands were throbbing, helmet was fogging, and holy shit was I cold. As I putted past the “watch for elk” signs, I decided slow and steady was the best approach, as my panic braking skills were likely none at this point.

    But my perseverance paid off, and I could see my house. I turned on to my dirt road, (Hell yeah brah ADV!!) even though I signed a contract saying I wouldn’t take the bike on dirt roads, and cruised that hog right into my garage. (Anarchy! WILD HAWGS!) I went straight to the water heater, cranked it up, ran inside and cranked up the heater, and took my time stripping my multiple layers, as it was a brisk 59 in the house.
    D2997281-FCC7-4216-8C38-241D3629D904.jpeg

    I spent the rest of the evening slowly getting sensation back in my hands, laying down in the shower, sitting in front of my ghetto fabulous electric fireplace, and of course, hooking the fish up with some tank maintenance and a water change.

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    I swear there’s fish in there. They just like to hide.

    1CB5F1BE-EA16-47C5-8692-67548800FE1D.png
    Incase driving straight on an interstate is difficult to follow.

    I had planned on getting a semi early start, as I wanted a good day of riding, so I tried to knock out fairly early. But my ears were ringing, and every time I nodded off I’d dream about oil leaks and leather vests. So I tossed and turned a few more hours until about 0600, checked the weather, saw it was 30, but wasn’t going to get much warmer any time soon. I decided to rip of the bandaid, and just hop on that bike and make a mad dash for lower elevation, and hopefully warmer air.


    To be continued.. but here’s a teaser I took right before setting off..
    C9B22024-77FA-4587-821C-E741BB253C26.jpeg
    SNOW way!
    #14
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  15. LateToTheGame

    LateToTheGame Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    May 9, 2016
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    HAHA!! I love this. Obviously I've been doing it wrong with all this worrying and obsessive planning and doubt...
    #15
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  16. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
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    Flagstaff, AZ
    Oh there’s plenty of doubt, just gotta yell back at the voices :loco
    #16
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  17. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
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    Flagstaff, AZ
    Alright here we go again. I’m on my phone now, so if my formatting is even more screwed, then I’m sorry for hurting you.


    After giving up on trying to sleep, and realizing there wouldn’t be any warmth as long as I stayed in Flag, I decided to just bite the bullet and get moving. I had originally planned on wearing proper riding gear for the ride back, but it dawned on me that all of my riding gear is down in storage with my bikes. :.(

    B0237E75-8843-44E5-995E-365ACB743EE7.jpeg
    They deserve so much better :(. My old man bought that rebel. Not pictured is his CT90. A man of simple taste I suppose.
    Knowing I had no gear and not wanting to freeze my arse off again, I got real carried away with the layers. Sweatpants under the carhartts, two pairs of boot socks, both base layers, long sleeve tshirt, hoodie, and Columbia snow jacket with down liner. Not a bad squid suit if you ask me. I got on the bike and barely made it out of my driveway before my hands started to ache again.

    I got on the freeway, and the cold song started playing in my head. I could see the sun beginning to peer over the horizon, and I longed for its cancerous rays. I made it about 30 minutes before my hands could take no further abuse, so I pulled off and gave them a quick broil off the 1200cc heater.

    789329E4-0CC3-41CA-9AD7-5D762EF49740.jpeg 4928A3A7-A730-44B7-B6D9-27371C6292E6.jpeg
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    Snowy mountains behind me, and a fire-y sunrise in front of me. Easy choice to make.
    I got sensation back in my fingers, and hopped back on the bike. For what it’s worth, the rest of my body was quite toasty. I hadn’t put gas in the bike since Winslow, but some quick mental math showed I should be able to make it back there for my first fuel stop today. The fuel light came on again at 97 miles, and 9 miles later I popped off the highway in Winslow, ready to fuel up, and relieved I didn’t push it too far. I meant to look up the range once the light comes on, but never did do it.
    05529109-E97A-449C-8064-335257AFA611.jpeg

    You ever have those moments where you just are so mad at yourself for not having your GoPro? This freeway exit is on the right side, two left turn lanes, one straight/right turn lane. I was in the far left lane, and there was already a car stopped sort of straddling the line between the two left turn lanes. When the light turned, he pulled right in front of me, as I’d figured he would, then crossed over to the wrong side of the road, and just stopped in the intersection, blocking cars in both lanes. He was just sitting there, cool as a cucumber, while the guys he was blocking went ballistic. Classic Winslow.

    It was still too cold to ride comfortably, so I figured I’d go find me some breakfast and wait for a little more warmth. A quick google revealed a spot a few miles down the road. So there I went.

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    It was called “Falcon” I believe. Good stuff

    I got me a gigantic chicken fried steak, and drank a gallon or so of coffee.

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    Gravy train​
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    anywho, there’s leg one of this journey. To be, as you could guess, continued.
    #17
  18. neppi

    neppi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2017
    Oddometer:
    646
    Location:
    Tauranga, New Zealand
    Some forums are dumb like that with the pics. You’d have to go to your phone’s photo folder, choose the photo, go to ’edit’, turn the pic -any direction will do- and save it there like that. Then choose it again, edit, turn back the right way, save and then save it to the said forum again.

    a bit annoying, but you’ll get relatively good at it in the end. And you can do it in advance before even posting them to the forum. Makes it quicker. HA!

    Your writing is awesome! Luvin’ the rr! Keep up the good work!
    #18
    Gnarcosis likes this.
  19. Gnarcosis

    Gnarcosis The Chronicles of Gnar-nia Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    65
    Location:
    Flagstaff, AZ
    Sweet! That did it, thanks for the tip. And I appreciate the feedback! I’m gearing up for a proper journey on my AT, so wanted to test the waters and see if doing an RR is something I’d want to do.. Glad you like it!
    #19
  20. neppi

    neppi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2017
    Oddometer:
    646
    Location:
    Tauranga, New Zealand
    Sure thing! Your writing is mint. Keep em coming!
    #20
    Gnarcosis likes this.