Head or Heart: Super Tenere or Multistrada

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by ozbatts, Jul 6, 2019.

  1. ozbatts

    ozbatts Been here awhile

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    I guess it's an age old decision, but I thought I'd see if there was any feedback that could assist from owners out there.

    I'm looking to spend $10k-$12k on a large adventure bike. Suitable for 2up, 5,000kms + year, and realistically 90% on road.

    It appears this budget puts me in the 2010/11/12 range for either choice.

    My head says the rock solid reliability of the Super 10. My heart says I've never owned Ducati and the exhaust sound is intoxicating.

    I guess the main reason for my question is RELIABILITY of the Multistrada. I AM NOT mechanically minded, and will be relying of dealership/indys for servicing.

    I have owned KTM990, VSTROM 1000, KLR650s and DR750s in the past.

    Any comments re either bike is greatly appreciated.
    #1
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  2. lazerfan

    lazerfan n00b

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    #2
  3. lazerfan

    lazerfan n00b

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    2010 multistrada 1200s owner here. 28 000 trouble free miles, other than ohlins leaking fork seals. Not alot of miles on it, ride alot on my dirt bikes. But l love the multistrada.
    #3
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  4. STcorndog

    STcorndog No destination

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    I bought a new, "left over", 2015 Tenere in 2016 for $12,200. My second Tenere. Closest bike to maintenance free that there is. Low miles used ones with accessories are typically around $10,000 for a second generation (which you will want).

    A good friend is on a Multistrada. His experience has been a fair amount of maintenance and a few repairs, but he loves it. It is no doubt a great bike.

    The Tenere is an SUV, the Multi is a Corvette.
    #4
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  5. dansvan

    dansvan Adventurer

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    Tenere= no soul. If you ride for the sights, stops along the way, and destination, and the bike is a simple tool to get there, buy it. Multistrada=soul stirring. If the ride is every bit as important as the aforementioned items, buy it. It will engage you and connect with you in a way the Super10 never can.
    #5
  6. Deuce

    Deuce Crazy Canuck

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    Up here it cost over $2000 to do the valve check/adjustments on a Multistrada.

    :1drink
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  7. Samtech79

    Samtech79 Two wheeled lunatic

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    I've had both. Get the multi. It will probably break down at some point but it's much more fun to ride and tours better than the Tenere.
    Oddly the multi is less windy and has a better seat.
    The Tenere is about as exciting as a bowl of cold oatmeal.
    #7
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  8. Gmc28

    Gmc28 Gmower

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    A good, and usual mix of replies.... to which I’d lob in my take:
    You nailed your own answer in your question.... as you presumably know.

    But to that point, while the multi is likely going to mean more maintenance, the difference is quite small in reality, imho. I’ve had a number of Ducati’s, including a 2010 multi that I just sold last month (to make room for another multi), and they’ve all been a breeze on maintenance. Yes, the valves at the 15k mile service can hit your wallet hard, but it’s usually a one time deal, for most practical consideration. I’ve never had to adjust the valves on a Ducati more than once, though in fairness I’ve sold them all by around 40,000 miles. In fact, most of the valves never actually needed adjustment at all during that time... but gotta check them.
    I have an old Ducati 904 with 110,000 kilometers on the meter, and I guess that one did need some valves adjusted, which was presumably the 2nd time, but it was abused (I “rescued” it). I know plenty of duc owners that have gone well over 100k kilometers and only needed the one valve adjust.
    Belt change: easy, not expensive if you do it yourself or have someone who can do it not at retail dealer price.
    Rest is usual bike stuff.

    You say you’ve had a 990 ktm.... I have one, and love it, but that bike has been way more work then any my Ducati’s.

    Super tens are impressive, but I’m a huge fan of the multi.... hard to beat, and certainly worth the little extra maintenance, if it’s your style of machine.
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  9. BobcatSig

    BobcatSig They call me... Huckajawea

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    FIFY :D

    Buy the bike that moves your soul - that's what motorcycles do. It's an entirely emotional decision.
    #9
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  10. STcorndog

    STcorndog No destination

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    ROTFLMAO....you guys keep talking about soul. They told me my Harley had soul. I ride 15,000 to 20,000 miles a year. On one bike, that's all I need.

    I like oatmeal, Italian food can give me indigestion.

    Sure them fancy bikes are cheap to maintain if you know a "guy". If you don't.....well then that's another story.
    #10
  11. jwdub

    jwdub Long timer Supporter

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    I bought a 2014 Tenere ES last year fully loaded with Jesse Bags & Trunk for 10k. Other than replacing the rear spring for a heavier one, I've done nothing mechanical. (I also have a 2012 that I keep in AZ). I think they're a great bike and one that I can ride all day -- just did 1200 miles in 2 days on all kinds of roads including single lane forest roads pavement/gravel. I've owned Ducatis off and on since 1968. The last one was a 1000DS. While I love the sound and generally the handling is great, in the end they mostly were great for short rides but not for the long haul.
    As always YMMV.
    #11
  12. BobcatSig

    BobcatSig They call me... Huckajawea

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    Yes, but Ducatis actually have soul. :D
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  13. drdfblackm

    drdfblackm VeeFeer Supporter

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    My decision was between the Multi Enduro, 1290SAS and the GSAw. Ultimately the best deals right now are to be had with the Duc and the BMW. I think all the BMW guys are clamoring for the new 1250 and the GSAws are being sold at a good bargain. I picked the Duc.....yes it has soul (so does the KTM 1290) and they have a lot of really nice features. The TFT screen is amazing. The tank size is incredible. The Yamaha is a great bike do not get me wrong....but I just don't feel right on it and the engine is....well.....bland.

    In the end all the bikes will be good bikes and each has their own area they are good in.....but if you can handle the price of service....I say get the Duc....you will not be disappointed. They will put a smile on your face every time you go out on it....and even when you sit and stare at the bike in the garage.

    Also keep in mind....the first major service for the modern Ducati Multistrada comes at 16K miles I do believe....otherwise...just oil changes.
    #13
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  14. Bugnatr

    Bugnatr Two wheel road inspector

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    If you have a nice bank account, Multi. Being sexy will cost you.

    Dead nuts reliable? Yamaha
    #14
  15. MCGMB

    MCGMB Been here awhile

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    If you choose the S10, only get '14 and later -- many useful updates, including cruise. Should be able to fit into your budget easily. You'll likely have $$$ left over.
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  16. AzB

    AzB Fattest thin man

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    Get both. I picked a 2012 S10 a couple years ago for $4000. Rode it last year on my trip out west, 7000k miles in 3 weeks. Performed perfectly, comfortable enough for 900 mile days, and works great for weekend trips with my better half.

    And recently picked up a duc 1198. Not great for long rides, but what a blast on the mountain roads on a sunny Sunday. Paid $5000 for it. I'm prepared to do the maintenance myself.

    Why not consider having your cake and eating it too?

    The market is soft and the deals are out there, you just have to be patient, have good timing, and have cash in hand.
    #16
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